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Old 12-01-2018, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,562 posts, read 12,895,296 times
Reputation: 25739

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I've always been told I'm in Zone 8 and yet this map says Zone 9 all along my area. Thing is, that Zone 9 and the previous Zone 8 maps make no exception for the micro climate I'm going to be living in (which also says Zone 9). I'll be 40 miles away and 500ft higher than I am now and will regularly get snow flurries much more often than where I currently live, and also get much more rain and wind. I would be willing to bet my microclimate is more like Zone 6 or 7. Sometimes those maps aren't always as accurate as they could be.
Hmm. Did you consult a WA State zone map? Those are usually more accurate.

OK, I can’t find a WA State 2018 planting zone map. I did locate one from 2012 though, and I am in zone 8b, according to it. I think I’ll stick with whatever specific to state info I can find until it changes.

I do agree that elevation influences this stuff.

Last edited by silibran; 12-01-2018 at 11:16 AM.. Reason: Added information
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Old 12-01-2018, 01:01 PM
 
9,738 posts, read 7,574,988 times
Reputation: 23847
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
No. But they should be professional about advising people what the risks are when picking that plant. Perhaps this being a gardening forum, folks are assuming everyone is knowledgeable about plants and hardiness zones. In reality most homeowners aren't. They go to the nursery, see some pretty plants and think "oh, those will look so good in the yard." Take them home, plant them, and they die. It's one thing to make a conscious decision to take a risk. I've intentionally done that myself. Sometimes it works; sometimes it doesn't. It's another altogether to be who is uninformed to be mislead into thinking something will grow. And putting a label that's incomprehensible to the average homeowner may meet the legal minimum, but a professional, ethical nursery will tell the customer of the risk they are taking.
Are retail nursery staff expected to be horticulture advisers or just sales staff? Personally, just sell me the plant. I know how to Google.

What are these plant ethics?
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Old 12-01-2018, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,921 posts, read 47,946,074 times
Reputation: 17878
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Why do plant nurseries even bother selling plants that they are well aware that may not survive a particularly harsh winter in a given location? ...
I was a vendor in a Farmer's Market where one of the other vendors was selling tomato plants. It was February and we had a foot of snow on the ground. So I asked them about it. Every market day they would come with their truck fully loaded with plants, and every time they would sell out.

People in February want to dream of summer, so they buy plants. The vendors fully know that it is February. Those plants were grown in a heated greenhouse. Any fool who puts them outside, at 10F temps will kill those plants.

In a month those same customers will be back, and they will buy again.

The vendors fill their greenhouses with starts, and as the plants get bigger, they need to clear out room. So they sell plants.

Some customers will buy 6 generations of plants, to kill every one of them. and in Summer those same customers will be back at the market to buy ripe tomatoes from the same vendors.
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Old 12-01-2018, 02:59 PM
 
9,902 posts, read 7,840,805 times
Reputation: 17852
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
Living in Maryland, we had a mimosa tree in the front yard. It was messy but it was pretty.

After moving to northeastern PA, I really thought about planting one in my yard. I spoke to the people at the local nursery and they told me it wouldn't live in this climate. I looked at the chart and it did look like we are a bit too north to grow a mimosa.

One day I went for a walk and a nearby house has a large mimosa tree in the front yard. During the Summer months I frequently drive down that street so I can admire the tree and let them deal with the mess.
If you still yearn for a mimosa, get acquainted with the owners of the one you admire, and ask if you can have one of its offspring - mimosa seeds sprout all too readily and grow quickly. They are invasive nuisances in some southern states due to this, sadly. However, if you have a sheltered area in your yard, one might do well.

Yes, mimosas can be messy, but it's all biodegradable and their scent is unmatched.
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Old 12-01-2018, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,819 posts, read 29,869,056 times
Reputation: 12347
I was at Lowe’s a few days ago and saw Mango and Avocado trees for sale. They should know good and well those things won’t survive here, this is not Miami.

I also see stuff like Silver Maple, Pin Oak, and Lilac for sale here that are easily stressed by our long hot summers.
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Old 12-01-2018, 07:32 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,278 posts, read 5,964,562 times
Reputation: 11202
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I was at Lowe’s a few days ago and saw Mango and Avocado trees for sale. They should know good and well those things won’t survive here, this is not Miami.

I also see stuff like Silver Maple, Pin Oak, and Lilac for sale here that are easily stressed by our long hot summers.

Where is "here" for you? Is it within a hardiness zone of 7 to 11? If so, you have a choice of several varieties out of up to 500 hybrid varieties of avocados that will grow outdoors in the hardiness range 7 and on up from there, and if you have a greenhouse or solarium or live in the 9 to 12 range you up your chances with even more of the less hardy varieties. Many people already start their own avocado plants from seed and keep them in greenhouses or as houseplants in their homes during winter and put them outdoors in summer, even people who live in moderately cool to cold climates will do that. Some people bonsai avocado trees.

Most varieties of mangos typically won't grow outdoors in locations that might ever get hit at any time with temperatures in the 40's or below but some of the Philippine, Indochinese or Southeast Asian varieties of mangoes will grow indoors as houseplants or in temperature controlled greenhouses or outdoors in hardiness zones of 10 and higher.

Lots of gardeners in many different climates have temperature and light controlled greenhouse facilities on their properties or they grow their tropical plants and trees indoors as house plants. They don't mind being adventurous and taking on the challenges of growing and developing other hybrids that are not "supposed" to grow there but will if provided with the right conditions.

Should Lowes and other suppliers like them control their customers' choices of purchases depending on their locations? Should they deny those adventurous gardening people in so-called not suitable climes from the opportunity to buy the mango, avocado, maple, oak and lilac plants they want to grow which ever way they want to on their own growing set ups on their own properties?

If Lowes doesn't provide the name and variety and basic information about the plants they sell then they are remiss, and they should provide the information. But if they are providing the necessary basic information then that's all they need to do, and I think it's great that the Lowes at your location are selling the plants that you listed above. There will always be buyers who are knowledgeable, experienced and innovative and will be happy to buy those plants and will know what to do with them and be able to keep the plants growing just fine.

.
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Old 12-01-2018, 07:47 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
1,821 posts, read 726,180 times
Reputation: 5055
I can’t imagine why any nursery would sell a plant that did not have a great chance of survival in their particular zone. Most nurseries guarantee their plants for one year, so they are going to eat the loss, not the customer.
As a customer one would think they would be certain to check the tag to confirm the zone hardiness. At least I always did that when I lived up north.
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Old 12-01-2018, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,819 posts, read 29,869,056 times
Reputation: 12347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Where is "here" for you? Is it within a hardiness zone of 7 to 11? If so, you have a choice of several varieties out of up to 500 hybrid varieties of avocados that will grow outdoors in the hardiness range 7 and on up from there, and if you have a greenhouse or solarium or live in the 9 to 12 range you up your chances with even more of the less hardy varieties. Many people already start their own avocado plants from seed and keep them in greenhouses or as houseplants in their homes during winter and put them outdoors in summer, even people who live in moderately cool to cold climates will do that. Some people bonsai avocado trees.

Most varieties of mangos typically won't grow outdoors in locations that might ever get hit at any time with temperatures in the 40's or below but some of the Philippine, Indochinese or Southeast Asian varieties of mangoes will grow indoors as houseplants or in temperature controlled greenhouses or outdoors in hardiness zones of 10 and higher.

Lots of gardeners in many different climates have temperature and light controlled greenhouse facilities on their properties or they grow their tropical plants and trees indoors as house plants. They don't mind being adventurous and taking on the challenges of growing and developing other hybrids that are not "supposed" to grow there but will if provided with the right conditions.

Should Lowes and other suppliers like them control their customers' choices of purchases depending on their locations? Should they deny those adventurous gardening people in so-called not suitable climes from the opportunity to buy the mango, avocado, maple, oak and lilac plants they want to grow which ever way they want to on their own growing set ups on their own properties?

If Lowes doesn't provide the name and variety and basic information about the plants they sell then they are remiss, and they should provide the information. But if they are providing the necessary basic information then that's all they need to do, and I think it's great that the Lowes at your location are selling the plants that you listed above. There will always be buyers who are knowledgeable, experienced and innovative and will be happy to buy those plants and will know what to do with them and be able to keep the plants growing just fine.

.
I’m at the northern tip of the FL panhandle. Avocados would be about like those Mexican fan palms so many people plant, they’d do okay for a few years, and then we’d have a once a decade freeze in the low teens that would kill them. Same thing happens with citrus here if they’re not protected.
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Old 12-01-2018, 09:08 PM
 
10,786 posts, read 4,311,226 times
Reputation: 15403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
I can’t imagine why any nursery would sell a plant that did not have a great chance of survival in their particular zone. Most nurseries guarantee their plants for one year, so they are going to eat the loss, not the customer.
As a customer one would think they would be certain to check the tag to confirm the zone hardiness. At least I always did that when I lived up north.
Because it gives people a variety and an opportunity to buy plants and flowers rather exotic to them and not commonly found. People like that. People want more than pansies, boxwood and junipers. Many gardeners enjoy a challenge and as previously mentioned, some people over winter some plants indoors or in green houses when they can including citrus, sweet smelling jasmine and other plants considered non hardy in many zones. No one is forcing anyone to buy these plants. Information is readily available on most plants found on tags giving planting zones or minimum temps these plants can survive and many people have their smart phones and just look them up before buying them.
Lowes is willing to take the loss if and when these non hardy plants are brought back because having a wider variety of plants available brings more people into their nurseries and stores. They aren't stupid. If it wasn't profitable they wouldn't do it.
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Old 12-02-2018, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,272 posts, read 7,511,027 times
Reputation: 18094
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
If you still yearn for a mimosa, get acquainted with the owners of the one you admire, and ask if you can have one of its offspring - mimosa seeds sprout all too readily and grow quickly. They are invasive nuisances in some southern states due to this, sadly. However, if you have a sheltered area in your yard, one might do well.

Yes, mimosas can be messy, but it's all biodegradable and their scent is unmatched.
Good idea, thanks CC.
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