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Old 07-09-2013, 02:08 PM
 
274 posts, read 548,336 times
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jen5267 and G-Dale -

Thanks for the clarification. I forget that crime rates are much lower in San Diego compared to NYC. WOuld you recommend for Staten Island then Grasmere a little further south?

I will add, for safety of the communities that are just OK by NYC standards - meaning you need good street smarts and understand the area well are: Highland Park, east Williamsburg, Bed-Sty in Brooklyn; in Queens: some isolated spots in Ravenswood, some areas of Jamaica; Bronx: Kingsbridge and South Bronx; in Staten Island - some parts around the ferry terminal ar not so great - I noted in my walks there the area just to the southeast gets sketchy. I did not realize Tomkinsville is not the safest neighborhood. Manhattan: some spots in West Harlem and East Harlem; Washington Heights below 168th and east of the A train.


Check the crime safety map for all recommendations.

Last edited by astroia 34567; 07-09-2013 at 02:17 PM..
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Queens, New York City
470 posts, read 744,511 times
Reputation: 342
Quote:
Originally Posted by WayneFnR View Post
I definitely want to be in manhattan but I hadn't really considered doing queens or Brooklyn for maybe two, three months while I look for the right situation, cuz I've been locked into that one year lease mentality
It is going to be pretty tough to afford to live in Manhattan on a retail worker's wages. I recommend you open your mind to living in Queens or Brooklyn. They are both really awesome places to live, and getting to Manhattan is trivial as long as you don't live too far out.

I mean, you could always live in uptown Manhattan where it is more affordable, but you are really better off (IMO) living in one of the other boroughs in a neighborhood that is close to lower/midtown Manhattan.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:11 PM
 
33 posts, read 39,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bremsstrahlung View Post
What kind of retail did you work in? Does 'high end' mean luxury brand retail?
I've been working at a high volume Nordstrom store in San Diego for the past 3.5 years selling designer and some non designer shoes for women. I think that would translate well into being a waiter because I take "shoe orders" all day and I'm excellent at working with the public.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:12 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,490 posts, read 3,812,423 times
Reputation: 2138
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroia 34567 View Post
jen5267 and G-Dale -

Thanks for the clarification. I forget that crime rates are much lower in San Diego compared to NYC. WOuld you recommend for Staten Island then Grasmere a little further south?

I will add, for safety of the communities that are just OK by NYC standards - meaning you need good street smarts and understand the area well are: Highland Park, east Williamsburg, Bed-Sty in Brooklyn; in Queens: some isolated spots in Ravenswood, some areas of Jamaica; Bronx: Kingsbridge and South Bronx; in Staten Island - some parts around the ferry terminal ar not so great - I noted in my walks there the area just to the southeast gets sketchy. I did not realize Tomkinsville is not that safe. Manhattan: some spots in West Harlem and East Harlem; Washington Heights below 168th and east of the A train.

Check the crime safety map for all recommendations.
Grasmere is very nice..love it there.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:13 PM
 
2,853 posts, read 6,250,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WayneFnR View Post
I've been working at a high volume Nordstrom store in San Diego for the past 3.5 years selling designer and some non designer shoes for women. I think that would translate well into being a waiter because I take "shoe orders" all day and I'm excellent at working with the public.

I'm sorry but as someone whose husband is in the restaurant business, I do not agree that selling shoes means you would be a good waiter. Taking shoe "orders" is very different than being a waiter. It's difficult to find a restaurant job without prior experience.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:13 PM
 
33 posts, read 39,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bremsstrahlung View Post
It is going to be pretty tough to afford to live in Manhattan on a retail worker's wages. I recommend you open your mind to living in Queens or Brooklyn. They are both really awesome places to live, and getting to Manhattan is trivial as long as you don't live too far out.
Yeah I don't plan on doing that long term, just to get my foot in the door. I want to do work on the side to make additional money doing various things. So I'm definitely not planning on "making it" selling shoes or bar tending, it's just a means to an end for the immediate futere
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Queens, New York City
470 posts, read 744,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WayneFnR View Post
I've been working at a high volume Nordstrom store in San Diego for the past 3.5 years selling designer and some non designer shoes for women. I think that would translate well into being a waiter because I take "shoe orders" all day and I'm excellent at working with the public.
Well there's a ****load of high end retail in NYC so you can probably find a job somewhere since you have experience. Waiting tables is also an option, as has been discussed. I would think the turnover in retail stores is pretty high--anyone know for sure?

It's definitely not a path to riches, but it will support you while you get settled in the city and figure out what you want to do long-term. Have you thought about that, by the way? NYC has lots of great opportunities for career development. Once you qualify for in-state tuition (12 months), I think the public schools are very affordable, just in case you're considering going back to school.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:34 PM
 
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I have street smarts as I kinda grew up in the ghetto part of sd, and I've been to nyc a couple times and visited queens, Brooklyn, Harlem, as long as its moderately safe ill be ok...I don't look like the type you'd want to mess with so I feel confident in my ability to handle an area that's slightly gritty.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:39 PM
 
274 posts, read 548,336 times
Reputation: 178
Yeah I will add tutoring is big avenue to earn extra money - maybe support yourself if your have excellent credentials. If you have excellent SAT scores abnd high grade point average from a good school you could make very, very good money. But for the highest pay in neighborhood like Upper East Side, West End Ave, Battery Park City you need stellar credentials or great word of mouth. Care.com may offer you a start but the wages range from a measly $10 /hour to decent $30+.

I second the comment that restuarant business is tough in NYC and your retail experience will not translate. I hate to say this many people fudge their resumes to get a job ... or you go to places such as Williamsburg, Bushwick, Park Slope, Gowanus, Astoria, LIC, Sunnyside, or uptown Manhattan and work at a restaurant place for less money. It may still be competitive but you increase your chance of getting into the field.

In Manhattan, you could do restaurant chains like Outback, Friday's, etc it might work to get into tjhe field but competition will be tough - actors, musicians, restuarant workers coming to New York, etc will be your competitors.

Entry-level hospitality industry jobs may work.

For retail, look Nordstrom is good but it is competitive in NYC. This is where we have Sakx Fifth Avenue flagship, Bergoff and Goodman, all the Madison Avenue stores, etc. You definitely can get something in retail, but be flexible, but don't think you can translate that easily to all industries. One thought is to consider working for event planners and to save money on seeing music concerts and Broadway shows consider ushering.

In lieu of your desire to live in Manhattan, trust me Manhattan is not all that, do try Brooklyn and Queens. Try Fort Greene, Boerum Hill (closer to Smith Street area), Prospect Heights, Park Slope, Long Island City (Hunters Point/Court Square), Astoria which are all fairly close to parts of Manhattan. If Manhattan, Upper West Side, Yorkville, Lower East Side MAYBE parts of East Village, far west Midtown, Murray Hill. These areas are quite safe and offer plenty of commercial strips for eating, socializing and some shopping (the quality ranges from high-end to very middle brow)

Hopefully you are not dizzy with the info overload. Just trying to help.

If you ever want a more in-depth tour of an neighborhood, feel free to contact me. I can show you around some areas.

Last edited by astroia 34567; 07-09-2013 at 02:47 PM..
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:43 PM
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11,386 posts, read 9,848,968 times
Reputation: 6580
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroia 34567 View Post
Yeah I will add tutoring is big avenue to earn extra money - maybe support yourself if your have excellent credentials. If you have excellent SAT scores abnd high grade point average from a good school you could make very, very good money. But for the highest pay in neighborhood like Upper East Side, West End Ave, Battery Park City you need stellar credentials or great word of mouth. Care.com may offer you a start but the wages range from a measly $10 /hour to decent $30+.

I second the comment that restuarant business is tough in NYC and your retail experience will not translate. I hate to say this many people fudge their resumes to get a job ... or you go to places such as Williamsburg, Bushwick, Park Slope, Gowanus, Astoria, LIC, Sunnyside, or uptown Manhattan and work at a restaurant place for less money. It may still be competitive but you increase your chance of getting into the field.

In Manhattan, you could do restaurant chains like Outback, Friday's, etc it might work to get into tjhe field but competition will be tough - actors, musicians, restuarant workers coming to New York, etc will be your competitors.

Entry-level hospitality industry jobs may work.

For retail, look Nordstrom is good but it is competitive in NYC. This is where we have Sakx Fifth Avenue flagship, Bergoff and Goodman, all the Madison Avenue stores, etc. You definitely can get something in retail, but be flexible, but don't think you can translate that easily to all industries. One thought is to consider working for event planners and to save money on seeing music concerts and Broadway shows consider ushering.

In lieu of your desire to live in Manhattan, trust me Manhattan is not all that. Try Fort Greene, Boerum Hill (closer to Smith Street area, Prospect Heights, Park Slope, Long Island City (Hunters Point/Court Square), Astoria which are all fairly close to parts of Manhattan. If Manhattan, Upper West Side, Yorkville, Lower East Side MAYBE parts of East Village, far west Midtown, Murray Hill. These areas are quite safe and offer commercial strips for eating, socializing and some shopping (the quality ranges from high-end to very middle brow)

Hopefully you are not dizzy with the info overload. Just trying to help.
Very good information. But I agree, there are many good alternatives to Manhattan. If you'd be stretching it financially in Manhattan, just live somewhere else. There are many good areas in other boroughs, while being a quick train ride away.

FYI, at least in my experience here in LA, people are less likely to rent to you if you don't have a job. But I found a place in less than a week there. Just keep scouring Craigslist for places within your budget. The finding a job in 8-10 days part is less likely.
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