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Old 08-09-2010, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,328 posts, read 12,156,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Baloney !

Source please............
Will the National Weather Service do? This week in Devil's Lake!
7-Day Forecast for Latitude 48.12N and Longitude 98.88W
Highs for the week: 83 to 90 degrees. Current Humidity: 78%

See also National Weather Service Climate
(Grand Forks and Fargo historical data)

Note the wide span of record temperatures!
Graphic Climate Data, NWS WFO Grand Forks, ND

There's a lot more data there somewhere but they've changed some of the setup and I can't find it offhand.

I would agree that I don't recall ND ever feeling as soupy-aired as, say, MN south of Minneapolis, where you can carry the summer air in a bucket, if it doesn't boil first.
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Old 08-09-2010, 04:46 AM
 
35,121 posts, read 37,802,296 times
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Quote:
I would agree that I don't recall ND ever feeling as soupy-aired as, say, MN south of Minneapolis, where you can carry the summer air in a bucket, if it doesn't boil first.
That is funny and where I live I have carried quite a bit of the summer in a bucket because of all the humidity. I am hoping to be in ND within the next couple months. I'm looking to relocate somewhere between Hazelton, ND and Dickinson, ND. Haven't found anything yet but still hopeful it won't take much longer.

I probably should take a nice long drive and go see for myself what is there.

PS-- I'm not in MN I'm in IL

Last edited by ElkHunter; 08-09-2010 at 06:26 AM.. Reason: fixed quote marks so they'd work.
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,328 posts, read 12,156,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
That is funny and where I live I have carried quite a bit of the summer in a bucket because of all the humidity. I am hoping to be in ND within the next couple months. I'm looking to relocate somewhere between Hazelton, ND and Dickinson, ND. Haven't found anything yet but still hopeful it won't take much longer.

I probably should take a nice long drive and go see for myself what is there.

PS-- I'm not in MN I'm in IL
Quintessential quiet farm country

T'aint been there myself, but I imagine Illinois climate isn't much different from southern Minnesota... calling it merely "humid" in summer is like calling the ocean "damp"!! However, I expect it's still downright dessicated compared to say, south Louisiana or swampland Florida.

Humidity is, uh, relative... couple weeks ago I went down from the desert into the San Bernardino area, and it was sticky-damp by my standards... meanwhile people from coastal L.A. were complaining about how painfully dry it was. What you're used to makes a big difference!
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:57 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 12,899,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Will the National Weather Service do? This week in Devil's Lake!
7-Day Forecast for Latitude 48.12N and Longitude 98.88W
Highs for the week: 83 to 90 degrees. Current Humidity: 78%

See also National Weather Service Climate
(Grand Forks and Fargo historical data)

Note the wide span of record temperatures!
Graphic Climate Data, NWS WFO Grand Forks, ND

There's a lot more data there somewhere but they've changed some of the setup and I can't find it offhand.

I would agree that I don't recall ND ever feeling as soupy-aired as, say, MN south of Minneapolis, where you can carry the summer air in a bucket, if it doesn't boil first.

C'mon !

You post at 1:50 AM and state the humidity is 78%

Post back at 1:50 PM and state the humidity.
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
18,696 posts, read 35,415,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
C'mon !

You post at 1:50 AM and state the humidity is 78%

Post back at 1:50 PM and state the humidity.
You can look up the data and post it yourself. Stop expecting and demanding that everybody else prove everything to you. This is not the great debates.
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Old 08-09-2010, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,328 posts, read 12,156,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
C'mon !

You post at 1:50 AM and state the humidity is 78%
Post back at 1:50 PM and state the humidity.
Noon close enough??
Same source:
Humidity: 55 %

But like Elk said, anyone can watch their local weather at noaa.gov -- it's also far and away the most accurate for both predictions and current/historical data.
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Old 08-09-2010, 12:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
What Acfreema said. Western ND is not as humid as say southern Minnesota, but you will still find yourself investing in a dehumidifier. Utah's heat is dry. ND's heat is humid. I'd really suggest trekking up there, say anywhere along the Red River valley, during a heat wave, to see what you're in for during the summer months. 80 degrees at 100% humidity is a lot more uncomfortable than 110 degrees at 10% humidity (like we get in the western high deserts).

Actually, if this is a factor, you might want to look into the Elko NV area instead, or somewhere north of Spokane. Not to dis ND (most beautiful of all states) but the fact is you can't get a profusion of greenery and a comfortably-dry climate in the same place.

--80 degrees at 100% humidity-

But the humidity in Grand Forks today ( which is an abmormally hot day) is only 55% ?
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Old 08-09-2010, 01:54 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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I see the Park River area is 94 degrees today. Nearing the record!

Which brings up another weather issue that I'm lead to believe is the case in North Dakota. In general, you have your average high temp for any giving day or week based on previous years of data. This is helpful to give an idea of what to expect. BUT, it doesn't give the whole picture. I really wish weather sites would also post standard deviations because they are nearly as important as the average high temperature and are really required to get the true climate situation. (the standard deviation deals with the average distance from the average--or the "spread" of the data)

Here's why it's important. If I look at an average high statistic of say 85 for a given day of the year, that average could come from a large spread of temps or a small spread. For instance, these sets of high temps have the same average (82) :

City #1 high temps for given day ten years running:

75 83 98 65 99 71 90 74 97 68

City #2 high temps for given day ten years running:

79 80 82 82 85 81 83 83 81 84

As I said, they both have an average of 82 degrees. But look at the differences in the wild swings up and down from year to year on the first one. The statistic that shows how "wild the swings might be" is the standard deviation. For the first set of temps the standard deviation is around 13.14, which would tell you that you would expect a given high temp to be about 13 off the average mark. The second set of temps has a standard deviation of 1.82, which tells you that all temps are pretty close to the average. So the second set would be more for a coastal area where temps don't vary from the average by much from year to year.

I'm of the impression that North Dakota is more like the first series of temps--large swings in high temps from year to year and day to day during the summer. Today is 94 () in Park River, but friday is forecast at 79 for a high ().

So when you guys tell me it gets really hot and humid, you are telling me the truth... but what you're not telling me is that it is not like this for four months solid during the summer (I hope to god!). It may be 95 and 80% humidity a couple of times a summer. It may be in the 60's a few times. The 70's a bit. The 80's. All over the place for highs. From now on, I will require the standard deviation along with you claims.

Anyway, kidding aside, I'm assuming North Dakota high temps have a pretty large standard deviation. Maybe DaninEGF can confirm this? Also, I would LOVE to find a website were I can get a more complete picture of the climate stats or even better, download the raw data and compute the stats myself...
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Old 08-09-2010, 02:02 PM
 
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There is a reaon why North Dakota is not a major corn growing states--------not enough growing degree units.

In fact, North Dakota had over 50% of the corn still in the field in January cuz they didn't get enough --growing degree units--for it to mature and dry down to a normal moisture content.
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Old 08-09-2010, 02:42 PM
 
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Chris, another thing to consider when comparing different regions/locations throughout the US is to compare # of heating units and # of cooling units required yearly .
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