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Old 02-21-2012, 03:38 PM
 
50,656 posts, read 26,726,952 times
Reputation: 15849

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
There isn't better 2:00 AM food.

The amazing thing about White Castle is that it is metabolized down to nothing but methane. No fiber whatsoever.
LOL...NONE!!! No fiber. It just comes sliding out just like it slid in...hence the name. Gives me the most awesome tank of natural gas on the planet.

Actually, as long as i avoid the burgers, i'm ok. The fish doesn't bother me, and neither do the Chick sandwiches.

My brother says you can cut the methane factor down by telling them you don't want the onions on the burger. LIKE HELL!!! Without the onions, aint no sense in even setting foot in the place.
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Old 02-21-2012, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,408,047 times
Reputation: 7084
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdetroiter View Post
LOL...NONE!!! No fiber. It just comes sliding out just like it slid in...hence the name. Gives me the most awesome tank of natural gas on the planet.

Actually, as long as i avoid the burgers, i'm ok. The fish doesn't bother me, and neither do the Chick sandwiches.

My brother says you can cut the methane factor down by telling them you don't want the onions on the burger. LIKE HELL!!! Without the onions, aint no sense in even setting foot in the place.
It's BS that the holding the onions cuts down on the methane factor. All that does is remove the onion smell.
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Old 02-21-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Moderate conservative for Obama.
833 posts, read 556,496 times
Reputation: 371
I dont care two hoots about indians, they dont like showers, they speak with a very annoying accent (tongue sellotaped to their mouths), they are not very patriotic and they will never bleed for America, even when they fought for the king of england durring WWII, they were like cowards. They love keeping themselves to themselves.
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Old 02-21-2012, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Mexifornia
969 posts, read 791,268 times
Reputation: 977
Quote:
Originally Posted by plwhit View Post
I don't think the OP was referring to those indians....
I think he was, asians from asia came over to north america thousands of years ago.

And why is it that some asians try to change their accent? They should be proud of where they come from.

http://youtu.be/4FNsfQEPaO8
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:24 AM
 
985 posts, read 3,262,839 times
Reputation: 413
Default Asian & all-American Man?

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
I was thinking about this the other day because of Lin and how ESPN fired it's writers for some insensitive remarks. What I found interesting is that ESPN fired these writers not because some Asian American group demanded it but because of pressure from the Net and media folks.

I think Asian Americans are too busy with school and work to be perpetually offended by relatively meaningless remarks made on a sports site.

Whereas Blacks, Jews, gays and other groups have perfected the victimhood and outrage act to an art form.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenfriedbananas View Post
I think this thread has a point. I think that while the profile has been raised for other groups like Blacks, Jews, Hispanics, and other Americans, it seems like casual racism and stereotypes often seem to be overlooked here. In fact I sometimes have felt that people in this society might not be even aware that certain attitudes toward Asians can be considered racist.

Part of that has to do with what EdwardA referred to. I think Asians themselves have been historically reluctant to respond to every single instance of racism and have mostly detached themselves from mainstream media and attitudes toward them. But I think that with the growth of the internet, and with people communicating more openly about it, I think that's changing. I think more people of Asian descent in this country are beginning to feel emboldened to come out and criticize more openly and contest even casual incidents of racism, which they didn't do so much in the past.

Having said that, going back to the Jeremy Lin thing, and going back to other high-profile instances of racism, I have always felt that it's not always right to just fire someone the moment that they make a mistake like that. I don't think the writer should have been fired. I think he should have been disciplined, and publicly forced to apologize. But there could have been more good to come from that. I think having someone like that attend racial sensitivity classes and blogging about his experiences might be an even better way to deal with it. Firing just gets rid of some guy for writing something dumb. There must be a ton of people who are ticking time-bombs for saying or writing something dumb in any organization. What happened to giving them an opportunity to learn and grow from the experience?

Instead this guy who got fired is on the one hand going to feel bad about what he did (which he probably would have already) but instead of focusing solely on his error and his ignorance, he's going to feel like a victim, and a part of him might not regret anything. A part of him might feel bitter, defiant, and self-righteous about his treatment. I wish companies in this society (and people in general) would stop taking the easy way out. ESPN hired this guy. He slipped through their cracks and their vetting process. It's still a reflection on them either way. To me, though, it's an even bigger reflection on them that, rather than just accepting that they could do a better job of creating a climate of awareness and sensitivity on their own staff, they just decided to take the easy way out. ESPN is chickensh*t. Everyone lost here.
The USA has found it hard to see Asians, especially the males, as American. There's been a sense that they'll always be foreign, even in the 2nd generation or beyond.



A reason is because Asians generally have been more silent, which has at least two implications:
1) Allowing the general public to think that taunting them is not even remotely as bad as doing it to, say, Blacks.
2) Reinforcing the sense of Asians being foreign, since America generally has valued the trait of being outspoken, equating the opposite with weakness.

But things are changing, one step at a time.
Jeremy Lin reinforces the stereotypes associated with Asian men, like for example being silent even when you're obviously being treated with injustice [thus seen as weak & effeminate by the general American psyche], and at the same time he shows that it doesn't have to make you less American.
He's broadened what a lot of Americans think of what it means to be an American man. Cause if we're being honest, the traits of being Asian [male] and being American have been seen as contradictive in a lot of people's minds.
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:52 AM
 
4,749 posts, read 3,609,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
The USA has found it hard to see Asians, especially the males, as American. There's been a sense that they'll always be foreign, even in the 2nd generation or beyond.



A reason is because Asians generally have been more silent, which has at least two implications:
1) Allowing the general public to think that taunting them is not even remotely as bad as doing it to, say, Blacks.
2) Reinforcing the sense of Asians being foreign, since America generally has valued the trait of being outspoken, equating the opposite with weakness.

But things are changing, one step at a time.
Jeremy Lin reinforces the stereotypes associated with Asian men, like for example being silent even when you're obviously being treated with injustice [thus seen as weak & effeminate by the general American psyche], and at the same time he shows that it doesn't have to make you less American.
He's broadened what a lot of Americans think of what it means to be an American man. Cause if we're being honest, the traits of being Asian [male] and being American have been seen as contradictive in a lot of people's minds.
I haven't watched the video yet, but I agree with the above. I think that Asians in general are often regarded as immigrants, even the ones who are born here. They're probably more likely than others to be asked 'Can you speak English?'.

But I also agree with what you're saying particularly regarding Asian males. I think that a lot of Asian males grow up with a kind of conflict, with their families giving one model of 'maleness' and society around them offering another, entirely different model of what it means to be 'male'. In Asian households, being a man means doing well in school and taking steps to ensure that you get a great job after graduation. Being a hard worker. Being a team player first. Respecting authority. Understanding that the team and its goals are bigger than you. That kind of thing. It's what sets up Asian men to get a lot of good entry level jobs and become respected by employers in many instances.

However, in a lot of American society, this is not what is modeled as being male. Instead, much of American society seems to promote the idea of being macho, of being independent, of being rebellious and not taking orders. Being an independent, autonomous decision maker is valued. Being physically strong and having a bold and assertive personality is valued over being loyal and obedient to authority. That contrast makes it easy for others to perceive Asian men as weak.

As I said, though, I think people in the Asian-American communities are beginning to feel more confident in standing up for themselves. You see more and more consciousness being raised about this issue. I think that in time, things will change.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:11 PM
 
985 posts, read 3,262,839 times
Reputation: 413
Default Azn

To the original question of the thread I found this :

Acknowledging that the ESPN editor who was fired may be telling the truth when he says he didnít mean to use the word as a racial pun;

"
The editor might well have made an honest mistake.

That is precisely the problem.

Most Americans ó particularly those who are fastidious about cultural sensitivity and horrified by any charge of racism ó donít think they have anything to learn when it comes to Asian-Americans. They are accustomed to seeing us as model minorities, accepting us as honorary whites (often with the unthinking condescension that term implies) or dismissing us as foreign, exotic or irrelevant*. They are not accustomed to one of us becoming an overnight basketball phenom ó or to hordes of us shouting our anger** at an egregious offense, as is now happening.

Put another way: People donít worry about making fun of Asians. Not even when it comes to a slur that is, indisputably, as ugly as ďthe N-word.Ē
"


*Asians [especially males] as the perpetual foreigners.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickenfriedbananas View Post
I haven't watched the video yet, but I agree with the above. I think that Asians in general are often regarded as immigrants, even the ones who are born here. They're probably more likely than others to be asked 'Can you speak English?'.
**
Quote:
"In this country, Asian Americans are stereotyped as the meek and the mild, the ones who will always take the racism," said Daryl Maeda, an associate professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado who specializes in Asian American studies. ''There is a perception that it's OK to offend Asian Americans because they simply won't fight back.''
From here.
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Old 03-09-2012, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Florida
21,660 posts, read 11,127,912 times
Reputation: 7888
How about Christians.. they are constantly put down by the left.
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Old 03-10-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Texas
779 posts, read 985,919 times
Reputation: 904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taratova View Post
How about Christians.. they are constantly put down by the left.
Being a Christian is a choice. Being black, Asian, Indian, Native American, German, etc. is not a choice. You are born into it.
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
409 posts, read 209,241 times
Reputation: 137
yes it's okay to make fun of anyone. It's called free speech. Political correctness is destroying America.
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