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Old 08-30-2019, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,858 posts, read 11,004,453 times
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IMO, 30-year roofs are a lot like "lifetime guarantees." Who is going to be around in 30-years to contest the longevity? -- or "lifetime" of what? (the roof or the resident).
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:17 PM
 
Location: LKN
1,825 posts, read 1,688,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
A 30 year roof rarely lasts 30 years, and I would consider $12,900 to be an amazingly good price. We replaced our "25 year" roof last fall (after 18 years) and it cost us just over $20,000. Metal roofs will normally last as long as the manufacturer claims, but for shakes or composition the climate and how it's maintained make a huge difference.
+1. I used to work for a Fortune 500 company that had roofing among their product lines. It is very rare for a traditional shingle roof to last as long as the stated life claims whether it's 20, 30 or 50 years. And of course the "warranty" prorating makes sure the warranty is useless long before the stated life.

Same with tires, some get closer to advertised life than others, but I've yet to get the stated life out of a set of tires, and we drive nothing but gentle highway miles. Same with those "warranties" - pretty useless.
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Old 08-30-2019, 01:46 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,170 posts, read 3,312,506 times
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Thanks everyone for your gracious opinions and experiences. I'll speak to my co-worker and let him know what I have read (Or point him to this forum) The area he lives in is largely forested, but cleared near his house and it being Washington, we don't get any vicious hailstorms.

I do again say thanks to everyone, it's really helpful to have so many voice their opinions and other issues they have had to deal with.
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Old 08-30-2019, 02:41 PM
 
1,834 posts, read 638,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
+1. I used to work for a Fortune 500 company that had roofing among their product lines. It is very rare for a traditional shingle roof to last as long as the stated life claims whether it's 20, 30 or 50 years. And of course the "warranty" prorating makes sure the warranty is useless long before the stated life.

Same with tires, some get closer to advertised life than others, but I've yet to get the stated life out of a set of tires, and we drive nothing but gentle highway miles. Same with those "warranties" - pretty useless.
Exactly. I have a new "50" year old roof. Intentional quotes. Can't imagine an insurance company will insure it that long. Our last roof, 30 year old roof. Silly us imagining that meant something. Nope. Happened to be chatting with our insurance agent/friend about roofers for another project and he said..hey, it's about time for your new roof, we can't insure it after suchandsuch date. A couple months away. I was supposed to be watching that, not really him. Insurance is a safety business. They can insure short of life expectancy. And I feel that's smart. Our roof that never leaked and still looked good...only insurable for 26 years. Got a new roof quickly.
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:47 PM
 
3,895 posts, read 1,003,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
IMO, 30-year roofs are a lot like "lifetime guarantees." Who is going to be around in 30-years to contest the longevity? -- or "lifetime" of what? (the roof or the resident).
... and all the ones with non-transferable warranties. Not all homeowners keep up with documentation, anyway. Maybe if the roof was done in anticipation of selling the house in the near future, they might keep receipts.

I think they're banking on the fact that the next homeowner will assume that they're not getting the guarantee because the previous one put it on. What exactly happens in a roof warranty claim, anyway? So much cost goes into labor... is GAF going to just provide new shingles with the homeowner responsible for the labor to replace the defective shingles?
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Old 08-30-2019, 11:13 PM
 
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The house I had built in 1976 had the old single ply three tab shingles on it. The current owner had it replaced in 2018.

42 years! No problems until the end.
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Old 08-31-2019, 04:39 AM
 
14,473 posts, read 7,726,346 times
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An asphalt shingle roof will look really ratty long before it actually fails and lets water in. A realtor cares about curb appeal. A brand new roof improves curb appeal and makes the house easier to sell. It’s not their $12,900.

I had major work done on my roof 6 years ago. 1/3 of it was totally re-framed. I used lifetime architectural shingles. I’m 61. The roof may look awful if I’m here in my 80s but it’s unlikely it will actually fail.
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
6,154 posts, read 3,416,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
Thanks everyone for your gracious opinions and experiences. I'll speak to my co-worker and let him know what I have read (Or point him to this forum) The area he lives in is largely forested, but cleared near his house and it being Washington, we don't get any vicious hailstorms.

I do again say thanks to everyone, it's really helpful to have so many voice their opinions and other issues they have had to deal with.
In Washington the major limiting issues are fir needles and other tree debris, mildew, and moss. Being proactive, blowing (not sweeping or pressure washing!) debris off the roof and preventing mildew and moss is key to roofs lasting out here.
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:51 AM
 
3,207 posts, read 3,277,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Was any of the roof replacement reflected in the final price of the home?

Well the house sold. Contract on one had already been written and it was only at the last minute that the mortgage company demanded a new roof to fund the mortgage. Seller was in a bind they had to move out of the area for several reasons and couldn't wait for it to go back on the market. the interesting thing was I found out later that the buyer worked for a company that makes asphalt shingles (TAMKO) and later laughed about the story. It turns out through his contacts and the realtors he lined up a contractor and the materials to get it done quickly and reasonably so the seller and he basically split what the cost would have been.


The other one fell through when the seller refused to replace the shingles with no increase in cost (mortgage company would not go one dollar more on the mortgage commitment (This was the one that argued the closing date vs the contract date). The general feeling by both sides was that the mortgage company saw the rates rising and was finding excuses not to commit at the lower rate, Buyer ended up with another company but at a higher rate and the closing was drug out a couple months


Neither of the houses used certanteed shingles - With the TAMKO factory about 20 miles away they seem to be the most widely used ones in the area.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:41 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,728 posts, read 5,057,848 times
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When I bought my late aunt's house in August of 2017, the roof was 21 years old and all three roofing companies I get estimates from plus my mortgage company said it had to be replaced as a condition of me using my VA benefits and getting the loan. I was scheduled to move in October 17th. Along comes Hurricane Irma on September 10, 2017 before I had actually moved into the house. Since the roof was 21 years old and I was told it must be replaced and the windows were 47 years old and considered very inefficient jalousie windows I expected to find the house in shambles when I was finally able to return.

Surprisingly the only damage was a small flowering tree that blew over during the storm. Not a bit of water intrusion in the house. I would have replaced the roof regardless since it was black and a black roof in Florida is a no-no in my opinion.
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