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Old 10-04-2007, 06:00 PM
 
10,332 posts, read 9,376,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie1 View Post
I am not sure which Katie some of you are refering to me or 45...No matter if you buy or rent you still have neighbors good or bad. Katie45 seems to be planing ahead..I for 1 wish her the best. [at her age my back went & so did my plans HUD was not my choice either.]
I applaud you for doing what it takes to survive! Even though I am planning ahead, as we know, no one can predict the future and anything can happen. I hope you are doing well...and my best wishes for you too!
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Old 10-04-2007, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Finally escaped The People's Republic of California
11,119 posts, read 7,568,091 times
Reputation: 6217
Go over to the Missouri board, there is a thread about an apartment building that's only for seniors, around Table Rock lake, Kimberling City I think. It rented for $400.00 I think is what was said... State subsidys or something..
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:41 AM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,558,234 times
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I am considering buying a house in Bath, ME and finding a job to supplement. Thoughts?


I don't think Bath is particularly affordable. I guess that's a relative idea. Work up there is a real issue, though. There just isn't much. You absolutely need a very reliable car for winter or any commuting to said job, if you find one.
That said, Reid State Park is my favorite place in the whole world, almost. Good luck.
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Old 10-05-2007, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,443,611 times
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We have found that we have been able to make do very nicely in Maine, on a limited pension plus a part time job in a grocery store.

We were able to buy land, build a house out in a rural forest area. We are starting up a small farm.

Our property taxes have been under $50/year.

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Old 10-05-2007, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
9,321 posts, read 16,579,200 times
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forest beekeeper. Can you tell us how far you go for groceries and for hospitals? Is your road paved? I am now curious what the tax burden would be on food, utilities etc. Do they have an income tax? I have a chart that shows Maine as number 3 on the highest tax burden states. But if you are more rural there might be a possiblity that someone could survive there on limited incomes. Thanks for the info.
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Old 10-05-2007, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,443,611 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotleyCrew View Post
forest beekeeper. Can you tell us how far you go for groceries and for hospitals? Is your road paved? I am now curious what the tax burden would be on food, utilities etc. Do they have an income tax? I have a chart that shows Maine as number 3 on the highest tax burden states. But if you are more rural there might be a possibility that someone could survive there on limited incomes. Thanks for the info.
Sure.

'Tax burden' is a very emotionally charged phrase. It is not saying that our taxes are high, as individually each tax on it's own is generally close to the national average or lower. Rather that when indexed according to household income [which on average is lower in Maine] than the over-all amount of taxes paid appears high.

We drive seven miles to get onto I-95. Our local roads are very well paved, the snow plows start-up when the snow begins. The roads are cleared entirely by 8 am the morning following each snow storm.

We bought raw land, forest. The power lines, phone lines and DSL were right at the pavement and accessible.

We get onto the freeway at exit #199.

At exit #197 is a gas station and hunting / fishing store and access into the Old Town with the various public schools, bars, and old Town canoe factory.

At exit #192 is a grocery store / three gas stations / and one mile further down that road is another strip mall.

Bangor city mall is at exit #187. With all big box stores, two hospitals [one Catholic and one teaching hospital], an international airport, the downtown has jazz festivals, and a museum.

Our tax brackets range from 2% to 8.5%

Our personal exemption for a married couple is $5,700; the standard deduction for a married couple is $8,600; so you must earn greater than $14,300 before being eligible to pay income taxes.

Social Security is exempt from taxes. Pension incomes, and government pensions both have a $6,000 exemption.

Sales tax is 5%

I paid $950 per acre for riverfront forest land in 2005. My SIL paid $350 per acre for forest with no river frontage across the road from me.

Our property taxes run $1.05 per acre.

Also I should add, that our crime is very low. Real crime that is, kids get bored, and so pumpkins do get smashed. But all winter long in the post office parking lot and at the grocery stores half of the folks leave their cars running. I have not heard of anyone stealing a car. But half of a parking lot will be unlocked cars with their engines running.

I hope that this helps.

My military pension is right even with working fulltime at minimum wage flipping burgers. My DW works part-time in a grocery store [because she wants to]. We still have one child at home attending highschool.

May God bless you.
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:34 AM
 
3,752 posts, read 9,603,435 times
Reputation: 7044
Just to point out alternatives, Indianapolis
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:45 AM
 
3,752 posts, read 9,603,435 times
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Hit send before I was finished.

Indy is a very large city (spread out) but we have researched options for elderly due to parents and for self in the future.

Indy has some wonderful senior complexes some with bus service to nearby shopping centers and such. I was checking and for low income programs it was about $500 per month with utilities included (except phone if I remember right). Around $800 for full income cost of one bedroom. We also have a large stock of housing of all kinds.

Inside laundry, mail delivery, garbage area, community rooms in each building and van service. I prefer the one south of the city because it is also walkable to the mall and a whole lot of services. Dont need to go outside though in bad weather.

These are fully independent apartments.

I also suggest carefully considering available services for future years. Some states are better than others. Some cities are better about bus service to larger senior apartments or have better plans for seniors.
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:56 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,883,976 times
Reputation: 23217
North Carolina Cities by Senior Households

I found this on another thread. You can go to this website and find out all kinds of statistics about different states. Maybe it will have the information you need. I love statistics.

Top 100 Cities with Oldest Residents (pop. 5000+)

Some of the same information is on city-data.

Last edited by NCN; 10-05-2007 at 11:10 AM..
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Old 10-05-2007, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,172 posts, read 6,886,609 times
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Indianapolis is one of the places I considered. Really nice livable city. Lively downtown, easy to get around. Good central location. I decided I wanted to stay in the South.
Other places I checked out and liked were Evansville, Indiana; Berea, Ky. (an interesting college there and it's a craft center); Lexington, Ky.; Baton Rouge (pre-Katrina, it didn't get hit but got a lot of people moving in from New Orleans; lovely city); Fayetteville, Ark.; Reno, Nevada; Chattanooga, TN; Asheville, N.C.; Flagstaff, Arizona; Santa Fe, N.M.
I ended up in Knoxville and I'm happy with my choice. I spent 1-1/2 years traveling around the country from the Midwest to the East Coast on jobs. There are some really wonderful towns and small cities out there that you might not think about off hand, but that could provide a wonderful life.
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