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Old 11-26-2007, 05:25 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,236 posts, read 18,516,359 times
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That is so amazing. I know that you're in Maine , beekeeper. Has it gotten cold up there yet?
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Old 11-26-2007, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,455,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy thereader View Post
That is so amazing. I know that you're in Maine , beekeeper. Has it gotten cold up there yet?
Not so much.

Last winter we did get one snow storm, that I had to get out the snow shovel. The previous year I never used it. I dont really mind if I have to do a little shoveling once a winter. So long as I don't need to do it more than once a month.

I have had to shovel far more snow while living in Connecticut, then in the past two winters living here in Maine.

We will have to wait and see what this winter has coming for us.

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Old 12-28-2007, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
3 posts, read 10,056 times
Reputation: 15
Default Retiring Cheap and Warm

This is my first post, so pardon me if I do something wrong. Thank you all for the information you have shared.

From Wisconsin, I also have been looking for a warmer, affordable retirement spot below the snow line. I've found some affordable places, but when I do a crime comparison, almost everywhere has twice or more the crime of Central Wisconsin. If anyone has found a smallish warm town in South Central U.S. where they feel very safe, please share. To KnoxGarden, I will check out Knoxville. Thank you.

I've seen some posts that HUD units take 30% of one's income for rent. That can be misleading. Health insurance premiums and health expenses are calculated in to reduce your rent. Some of the facilities have nurses a couple days a week. Some have free drug delivery, lunch for whatever you can donate, car pools/shuttle to groceries and food pantrys, etc. The units are usually small, but you can find safety and backup in a well managed HUD complex. You need to look for one where the residents respect the management. In my community there are towers as well as garden complexes, most let you have a pet and all have some kind of green space.

The apartments where you need a certain income are not HUD units. The owners agree to rent a percent of discounted units for a certain amount of years to get loan deals from the government. When that time runs out, the units go market rate.

As far as trailer courts, I have a friend who lives in Mission, Texas, who owns the land his trailer sits on. There's theft, but not much personal crime (assaults, rapes, homicides). It's a Hispanic community which welcomes snow birds. If it wasn't so far, I'd consider it for the low personal crime rate.

All around this country there are southern communities with cottages for $50,000 that would make great retirement communities were it not for the crime rate. Maybe the concept of "commune" needs to be resurrected...
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Old 12-28-2007, 06:34 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,585 posts, read 39,962,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CateD View Post
...Maybe the concept of "commune" needs to be resurrected...
I am with you on that... I just want to be part of a nice farm where I can keep a small cottage, some space, equip and a garden, and not be worried about getting 'cleaned-out' while I'm spending a few months / year doing international relief work.

communes are alive and well. (one form of 're-invention')
http://cohousing.org/default.aspx
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Old 12-28-2007, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,455,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
I am with you on that... I just want to be part of a nice farm where I can keep a small cottage, some space, equip and a garden, and not be worried about getting 'cleaned-out' while I'm spending a few months / year doing international relief work.

communes are alive and well. (one form of 're-invention')
http://cohousing.org/default.aspx

Around here they are called CSAs.

I deal with a number of folks [both young and old] who live on them.

They are very popular.

Then again when you can buy forest land on a river with paved roads, power and phone line all for under $1,000/acre, in an area that never has to deal with drought. Why not?

Forest land without the riverfrontage sells for $300/acre.

Yeah, I know why not, snow. Okay so not much farming is done in the winter. Not much shoveling is done either. Snow shoveling is for folks who still commute to work. The snow will leave on it's own, long before planting time.

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Old 12-28-2007, 09:19 PM
 
633 posts, read 801,939 times
Reputation: 257
Smile Inexpensive Retirement

I second what Bucfan has told you. Sun City Center SE of Tampa Fl.would be a likely choice. It was started many years ago by Del Webb corp. but was completed and operated by others. It is a mature 55+ community that is over 40 yrs. old. It is unique mainly because of affordability and wide price ranges which many of the like communities no longer offer.
Don't get me wrong, there are the luxury homes available(mostly the newer ones) but there is much nice blue-collar working people accomodations to be had. There are some older row units and small single homes. I would check the yellow pages for realtors who handle rentals as well as sales. There are NO rundown or shabby parts of town and golf carts can be used for trans. on the towns streets. I think for affordable retirement and a senior who lives alone this town would be worth your while looking into. Best of luck.
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Old 12-30-2007, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
3 posts, read 10,056 times
Reputation: 15
Default CSAs

Forest Beekeeper, thanks for the info on CSAs. VERY interesting! I was surprised there's none in Tennessee or Arkansas.

Re: Sun City Center, the Assocation Fee is pretty steep at $450. Top of the World in Clearwater start around $300 and is a very nice place. I used to think I'd retire at TOTW, but Florida has so many unknowns now with property insurance, special assessments, sinkholes, drought, etc.
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Old 02-03-2008, 11:37 PM
 
11 posts, read 14,572 times
Reputation: 10
Hi Tesaje :

I am from NEW JERSEY are you retired already ?

Contact me at :


[email]Mod cut

Last edited by Waterlily; 02-04-2008 at 06:31 PM.. Reason: no emails
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Old 02-04-2008, 02:59 AM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,475 posts, read 13,836,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
I have read many informative posts on this Board about where to retire in the U.S. What I am seeing are retirees who already own a home (mortgage paid off), have either a dual pension income (married couple) or a huge pension as a single person, have health insurance provided by a former employer....and, these individuals are financially able to relocate and purchase another home or live in a retirement community that runs around $2-3k/month, or they are in a position that they can travel a lot, play golf, etc.

I am not in any of the situations listed above. I will be on a very limited income, I do not own a home (have never owned a home), will not have health insurance other than Medicare and whatever supplemental health insurance I can afford to purchase.

I will have to continue to work after starting to collect s/s when I turn 66, either part time or full time for as long as I am able to work. I would love to start collecting s/s prior to age 66...BUT, I cannot survive financially on the lower monthly benefit...and with the rules about what I can earn annually (prior to age 66)...I would not make it.

Therefore...I am looking for areas to relocate to (other than KS where I am now...terrible winter weather and HIGH taxes, etc.)...that would offer me as mild a climate as possible (am thru having to drive in the winter on ice/snow)...and looking for housing (apartment to rent) that is below $600/month. At my stage of life and looking at my finances, purchasing a home would not be feasible, it would be better to just rent. Mainly because it is better to use the money to eat, etc., than have to put out a huge down payment and have to worry about the cost of maintenance on a home.

Anyone out there have any ideas where a single woman can live safely, in a weather climate better than KS, where the rents are in the $600/month or lower range?

I am not a 'party' person, not into traveling a lot, nor do I need to be on the go all the time. Also am not materialistic or into the night life scene. I am not into shopping and only buy clothes when they are really needed. I'm a person who is content and just looking for a place to "hang my hat" and be able to buy food, be safe and find full or part-time office work.

Maybe I'm just dreaming of the impossible. But there has to be others in a similar situation as I am. Not everyone has big bucks when the retirement age arrives.
Cairo, Georgia, Thomasville Georgia, Whigham Georgia. Actually any of the small towns in that area..Pavo..Coolidge...Meigs...etc..... Mild climate...far enough away from the hurricanes....to only get some rain...rents are cheap...cost of living is low. Small towns..with a small town feel. 600 a month for rent there is overkill. I rented a 2 bedroom trailer in Thomasville for $400 a month from Century 21.... in 2005.
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Old 02-04-2008, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,217,684 times
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You're right about Sun City Center's HOA being steep. But there's a lot of things covered in that fee including use of fitness center, social groups, shuttle buses throughtout the community, water and maintenance fees, and I believe household exterior insurance to your home. You'd have to check on all of this, though.
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