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Old 08-13-2009, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Colorado
852 posts, read 853,642 times
Reputation: 873

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
There's a lot of talk in this town. Very little of it materializes.

Sorry to be so pessimistic, but it's the truth.

Here's the latest story of the incompetence of city leaders and how it could significantly delay the start of the modern streetcar:

Costs soar for bridge's 4th redesign | www.azstarnet.com ® (http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/byauthor/304184 - broken link)

Here's a story about an underpass linking 4th Avenue to DT Tucson that took two years to redesign that has an additional cost of $15 million which city council failed to reveal to taxpayers:

4th Ave. Underpass rises to $46M | www.azstarnet.com ® (http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/byauthor/304186 - broken link)

Why do residents keep voting these council members in?
The people in Tucson keep voting them in because the majority of people in Tucson who vote like things exactly the way they are. That's the simple truth. I didn't understand their thinking when I lived there either, but I came to accept the fact that the majority of people in Tucson already have the community that they desire.

They are entitled to their point of view and should be allowed to create the kind of community that they enjoy living in so long as they remain the majority. Many of the "complaints" that people have against Tucson on this board are issues that other communities have solved quite successfully. Lot's of American cities have renovated their downtown, improved their schools, built light rail, created park systems, established robust and diverse economies, etc... In fact, I would say that the majority of communities in America are thinking about and resolving the types of issues that seem to paralyze Tucson's political process. Most people in most cities want good roads, good schools, clean sidewalks, nice parks, and great jobs in their community. For whatever reason, the voters in Tucson don't. Go figure...

 
Old 08-27-2009, 02:35 PM
 
153 posts, read 349,464 times
Reputation: 116
Tucson is really a collection of independent westerners living in a fast-growing space that has grown over the past 20 years from 300,000 to a million people. The inherent suspicion of government has proven to be true in the past 10 years or so, as the inner city deteriorates the bribes keep happening and nothing gets done. This will change.

But overall, if and when good leadership returns to Tucson, it can and will continue to be a vibrant, interesting, personal, colorful place with a strong artsy flair. That is, if you can stand the heat and sun. If you don't like the weather, then there's really no hope.
 
Old 08-27-2009, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
1,389 posts, read 2,250,245 times
Reputation: 686
Quote:
Originally Posted by New West 2020 View Post
Tucson is really a collection of independent westerners living in a fast-growing space that has grown over the past 20 years from 300,000 to a million people. The inherent suspicion of government has proven to be true in the past 10 years or so, as the inner city deteriorates the bribes keep happening and nothing gets done. This will change.

But overall, if and when good leadership returns to Tucson, it can and will continue to be a vibrant, interesting, personal, colorful place with a strong artsy flair. That is, if you can stand the heat and sun. If you don't like the weather, then there's really no hope.
Here is something I can agree with. We have a good chance coming up to replace at least some of the current local Government. Hopefully it happens.
 
Old 09-01-2009, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Tucson, Arizona
4,344 posts, read 6,634,808 times
Reputation: 3862
Quote:
Originally Posted by StockholmGTR View Post
Yeah, I understand where you're coming from. I grew up in Ahwatukee (Phoenix). When I was younger I lived a very sheltered/ privileged life and I didn't know how well I had it growing up. Now I know why people make jokes about where I grew up.

Change is hard. People don't react well to it most of the time. But people need to stop complaining and start doing. I see Tucson as my home and I want it to be better for everyone.

I was just driving back from In and out about 30 mins ago. I picked something up to bring back to my place and eat (I live about 20 mins away from both of them) and I was stopped at a red light about 5 mins away from my place. I noticed an older clean cut man holding up a sign saying "hungry, anything helps" and without thinking I just gave him what I was going to eat. I feel bad that I wasn't able to help him more but he looked so thankful when I gave him the bag. I'm just glad he got to eat tonight. I have food at home. He has no home. It's ****** up.

We need to pull together and help each other.
I think that was very nice of you to give him your meal. I do have a queston though. Why is there so much of this type person in the West. Homelessness or vagrancy whatever the proper word is, is all over the Western States. I have seen them in Tucson when I visit, but nothing prepared me for this living on the East Coast. Here in Portland where I live I am overwhelmed by them, as it is much more than I have ever seen visiting Arizona.

For me if I didn't have 2 cents no one would know. I would get a temp labor job that pays by the day. Out here I see people that could work, they obviously don't want to. So whats up with this whether its Tucson, Phx, Portland wherever. Im just curious.
 
Old 09-01-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Baja Arizona
2,916 posts, read 5,166,201 times
Reputation: 1086
Stockholm, I wish you the very best. You're one of the very few breaths of fresh air which have come onto this board. Please continue with your dream for change. Its a far cry from all of the negativos which continually come here from someplace else, or post here from afar and delight in their daily quest to put Tucson down. Forget them and their ridiculous droning. These trolls don't live here, or have no plans to live here, so its best to put them in your "ignore list"! They contribute nothing to Tucson.

Hold on to what you've got and keep up the good fight!
 
Old 10-21-2009, 12:57 AM
 
44 posts, read 79,150 times
Reputation: 47
You could be describing New Orleans, where we reside now [hoping to retire in Tucson]. What makes New Orleans worth its troubles is its culture. If Tucson could focus on its heritage and have an old town, authentic or not, with tourist oriented shops and museums, and stage cultural events such as festivals and concerts, the city would thrive. Everything you write is true, but with an inert government, little will happen. But residents could look into having free, outdoor cultural events with music, food, and wares. All it takes is finding a 'square' to stage festivals and raising funds to have them. When I moved to New Orleans it was beautiful but a bit seedy; then we started having 'block parties' on certain commercial streets, which attracted tourism. Gentrification soon followed. South Tucson could be perfect for this. Just a thought.
 
Old 10-21-2009, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Baja Arizona
2,916 posts, read 5,166,201 times
Reputation: 1086
Quote:
Originally Posted by angerdux View Post
You could be describing New Orleans, where we reside now [hoping to retire in Tucson]. What makes New Orleans worth its troubles is its culture. If Tucson could focus on its heritage and have an old town, authentic or not, with tourist oriented shops and museums, and stage cultural events such as festivals and concerts, the city would thrive. Everything you write is true, but with an inert government, little will happen. But residents could look into having free, outdoor cultural events with music, food, and wares. All it takes is finding a 'square' to stage festivals and raising funds to have them. When I moved to New Orleans it was beautiful but a bit seedy; then we started having 'block parties' on certain commercial streets, which attracted tourism. Gentrification soon followed. South Tucson could be perfect for this. Just a thought.
Unfortunately, many city governments eventually do become inert, as you put it. My take is that certain individuals suddenly decide they want to become mayor, city council persons, or county supervisors because they think it'll be "cool"... to be "in the limelight"... to be "in power"... to be called "your honor"... whatever! They're just glad to be there, but have no clue as to what they really need to do there. They're basically just dabbling at their position!

Tucson has had its share of both the excellent and the dreary government officials. Currently, they're so much closer to dreary. Too many primadonnas... too many individuals who believe its all about them... who think its better to put themselves first, and the city they're supposed to be serving falls way down on their non-existent "to-do" list!

Politics...
 
Old 10-22-2009, 01:00 AM
Status: "Time it was and what a time it was, it was." (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: In a state of confusion mostly
3,602 posts, read 3,288,441 times
Reputation: 4589
We relocated here from Colorado. Granted, we're up in Oro Valley which is somewhat distant from the urban blight of Tucson proper, but we have the same County Government. We were seasonal (okay, okay, Snowbirds) until last year and we had fallen in love with Tucson. We still love it, blight or no blight. So much of Tucson is beautiful and there is a lot to do here. True, schools aren't all that great, but there are some really good districts around, like Vail, which are very good. And, yes, there's grafitti, traffic, crime, gangs, growth, urban sprawl, and just plain congestion. County government is abysmal, and trying to get things accomplished on the city or county level is nearly impossible, but this could describe many, many cities in America, including Denver. Anyone who lives near Denver knows that it, too, has its good parts and its parts you don't want to be in even during the day. I understand people's frustration with Tucson and it's inability to move in to the new millenium, but there are many cities all over the US that have the same management problems, and their residents are probably griping as well.

If you want your city to be better, you can't sit back and witch and whine waiting for someone to come along and fix it. Rather than whining about the problem, get in there and be part of the solution. Write letters to elected officials. Tell them you, as a tax paying citizen, want to see some changes made. Involve yourself in projects like Habitat for Humanity, The Humane Society getting strays off the streets, volunteer for cultural venues, learn your city's history and be a docent at a museum where you can share your knowledge and make people aware of some of the things that need to be addressed to spruce up Tucson. Support a candidate who you believe stands for the betterment of Tucson and spread the word. Write a letter to the Editor. There are many things individuals can do that don't cost money, take up very little time, but in the end can make a huge difference. The only problem with that is getting people up off their couches, away from their TV's and motivating them to work for Tucson's good.

The writer from Denver knows that Denver had a major revitilization in the 1980's when the 16th street mall was built, the Cherry Creek area was revamped, and later when Coors Field was built and Lo-Do went from slum to one of the most desirable areas of Denver. Mile-Hi Stadium was replaced by Invesco Field, Elitch Gardens was revamped, The Aquarium was nice, but then Landry's took over and it's become much more touristy, rather than museumish, but it's still an attraction. The Zoo and the museums all underwent major transformations and the entire downtown area became a real magnet for business and entertainment. When DIA was built, the old Stapleton Airport grounds that merged with Lowry AFB became an urban utopia with housing, shopping, hospitals, schools and true neighborhoods. The old hospitals in downtown Denver began a move out East with beautiful, brand new campuses, light rail was built to connect Denver with it's suburbs and in 25 years, it went from a poorly designed cow town to an urban mecca that holds world class events. Colorado Springs is also beginning to see what Denver did and how it affected it's attraction to businesses and tourists, through entertainment, hospitality and and a newer, more polished look.

With the right leadership, money and vision, Tucson could really blossom, but it takes ordinary people to start the ball rolling.

Okay, I'm stepping down from my soapbox now and going outside to witch about the dust. That's something I can't change, so I'm entitled to witch.
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