U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-06-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
636 posts, read 238,936 times
Reputation: 1540

Advertisements

It's very beneficial to have on your resume if you're pursuing Manufacturing/Quality Engineering positions in high volume production, for the most part. The thought process is solid, but a lot can already be done without the formal training - simply take a step back when solving a production problem and think through it. However, it is useless and detrimental when companies start forcing it where unnecessary, bogging down engineers and other support staff with sometimes over-complicated forms/meetings to fill out even for the simplest actions.

Go for it, especially if the company is paying for it and the training is happening on their time. It definitely won't hurt your resume.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-06-2019, 12:27 PM
 
706 posts, read 434,667 times
Reputation: 720
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Like so many other management fads, the problem isn't with the concept, but with applying it outside where it's intended to work. It's possible in manufacturing for example to measure and machine a part to exacting levels of tolerance. But many management processes are more of a wet finger in the wind measurement. Hence why "metrics" has become a nonsense word in many offices -- management puts inordinate time into measuring what they can measure, usually nonsense, because they can't measure those things that actually matter.
^This.

The higher-ups at my employer brought six sigma to the organization years ago. I work in an in-house legal department of a large financial company. What we do is not quantifiable by statistical standards, such as how many widgets one can turn out in a day. As such, in my opinion, six sigma doesn't do a whole hell of a lot for us except create busy work for those who employ it as part of their day-to-day jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,586 posts, read 3,019,935 times
Reputation: 12813
Let's bring it down to brass tacks and the OP: any industrial-level management improvement system that ranks its practitioners with belt colors is an inherently self-serving, juvenile construct, created by experts who are experts at telling everyone how to be an expert.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 12:38 PM
 
11,122 posts, read 8,531,120 times
Reputation: 28089
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Girl View Post
^This.

The higher-ups at my employer brought six sigma to the organization years ago. I work in an in-house legal department of a large financial company. What we do is not quantifiable by statistical standards, such as how many widgets one can turn out in a day. As such, in my opinion, six sigma doesn't do a whole hell of a lot for us except create busy work for those who employ it as part of their day-to-day jobs.
Do you perform any processes? Even the process of how to file a document or track a legal matter can be quantifiable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
9,571 posts, read 10,308,975 times
Reputation: 13361
I have my Black belt. I'm an engineer that works in NPD and manufacturing. My employer offered the training, and wanted me to take it...so I did. Some of the course work was quite helpful such as DOE and FMEA's and such. Was quite a bit of time invested for sure, but it's what my employer wanted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 12:52 PM
 
540 posts, read 223,135 times
Reputation: 1545
Six Sigma Green Belt here. Management tagged me to participate in the corporate sponsored class and complete a project to earn my belt. That was my first certification. Then it was on to a quality certification (which tested on some elements of six sigma) and then to PMP (which has a Project Quality Management process group that tested on elements of both). So all of these built on one another and gave a knowledge base for the other certifications. Did it help me in my career? I would say so. It made me more marketable for process related positions within my work area.

The black belt requires a lot of testing and specific courses. The green belt is led by a black belt and the responsibility is on the black belt to get you certified. Green belt is good for those who don't like to bury themselves in study and testing.

If you don't keep doing projects you fade into a yellow belt. I am actually a yellow belt now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 01:01 PM
 
540 posts, read 223,135 times
Reputation: 1545
I went back to your original post. This is through ASQ. Their Black Belt (CSSBB) is a very difficult test. I received my Quality Certification through ASQ and would read the Black Belt forums on there. They also have a green belt that is less intense that you can test for. There are no projects (at least at the time I looked years ago) required for the ASQ green belt. I can't remember if you have to re test or if that is a permanent cert. Many of ASQ's certs require retesting.

A corporate sponsored program is different - it is one that is taken with a series of classes and you complete a project - not a certification exam. Usually a master black belt from corporate headquarters comes onsite and teaches a class and produces green and black belts for the company.

Last edited by Navyshow; 05-06-2019 at 01:21 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 02:13 PM
 
2,372 posts, read 2,390,052 times
Reputation: 2373
Our higher ups ran the entire IT Organization through Six Sigma Green Belt training back in 2005. Everyone had to complete a process improvement project in order to earn their Green Belt (so there were lots of contrived improvements to tick the box). A few people went on to attempt to earn a black belt, but not sure anyone other than the core group espousing the methodology actually earned one. Most of the learnings were common sense and if you don't already understand process improvement processes it could be useful. If they are paying for it, then no harm in getting it.


Since then we have gone through Lean Sigma, ADP and are now in the middle of switching to Agile/SAFe (probably missed one of the buzzword ones in my list).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 07:10 PM
 
11,122 posts, read 8,531,120 times
Reputation: 28089
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheapdad00 View Post
Our higher ups ran the entire IT Organization through Six Sigma Green Belt training back in 2005. Everyone had to complete a process improvement project in order to earn their Green Belt (so there were lots of contrived improvements to tick the box). A few people went on to attempt to earn a black belt, but not sure anyone other than the core group espousing the methodology actually earned one. Most of the learnings were common sense and if you don't already understand process improvement processes it could be useful. If they are paying for it, then no harm in getting it.


Since then we have gone through Lean Sigma, ADP and are now in the middle of switching to Agile/SAFe (probably missed one of the buzzword ones in my list).
Six Sigma and Agile/SAFe aren't really in the same area. One is process improvement and the other is project management. I guess a less sophisticated company could get them confused.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2019, 07:52 PM
 
6,839 posts, read 3,713,227 times
Reputation: 18078
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Do you perform any processes? Even the process of how to file a document or track a legal matter can be quantifiable.
Not every processes needs to be quantified. Not everything that is quantifiable matters and not everything that matters is quantifiable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top