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Old 03-29-2011, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,464 posts, read 9,638,897 times
Reputation: 2819

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
Maybe a safety factor?
From what I understand, cars with electronic fuel injection won't have enough power to actually get gas injected into the engine, if the battery is already too drained to run the starter motor.

At least that's what the AAA guy told s after we'd tried to do just that, and failed.
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Old 03-29-2011, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,252 posts, read 49,796,479 times
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Or just get this:

StartMeUp2- Portable Emergency Battery Charger.

Though it just occurred to me...wouldn't work in my car bc nowhere to insert a key...
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Old 03-29-2011, 10:53 PM
 
575 posts, read 801,070 times
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Being an american that prefers a manual shift with a clutch, I can tell you many americans prefer to drive something that is easier. That is not the whole story however. Ever since automatic transmissions became available I believe car companies have been offering them for one reason. Profit. They make more on expensive transmissions that cost 5 large to replace. But my mom use to drive a manual transmission in the 50's before her Arthritis prevented her from driving and that was when the shifter was on the column! I believe many people in america are lazy about driving and it is also a status symbol to drive a very expensive vehicle. If you don't have a automatic transmission it is considered less of a vehicle even though manual shifts are superior in so many ways.

I find it interesting that hybrid vehicles over here don't offer a stick shift at all and many regular cars don't either.


Give me a stick any day of the week. In traffic or out
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Old 03-29-2011, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 9,205,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebri View Post
I find it interesting that hybrid vehicles over here don't offer a stick shift at all and many regular cars don't either.
The first generation Honda Insight has a manual transmission.

Many regular cars don't because of the low sales take.
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Old 03-30-2011, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Eastern Missouri
3,054 posts, read 5,031,973 times
Reputation: 1377
the last new truck I almost bought was a "SPORT" package edition. I asked about ordering one with a 6 speed and was told the SPORT package wasn't avalinble with anything other than an automatic!!! I didn't buy either. I promply went home and wrote a letter to that brand's customer suggestion box. I did get a nice generic letter back, but nothing mentioning transmissions. I think you should have the choice of auto or stick in EVERY vehicle!
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Old 03-30-2011, 01:23 AM
 
25,836 posts, read 49,741,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebri View Post
Being an american that prefers a manual shift with a clutch, I can tell you many americans prefer to drive something that is easier. That is not the whole story however. Ever since automatic transmissions became available I believe car companies have been offering them for one reason. Profit. They make more on expensive transmissions that cost 5 large to replace. But my mom use to drive a manual transmission in the 50's before her Arthritis prevented her from driving and that was when the shifter was on the column! I believe many people in america are lazy about driving and it is also a status symbol to drive a very expensive vehicle. If you don't have a automatic transmission it is considered less of a vehicle even though manual shifts are superior in so many ways.

I find it interesting that hybrid vehicles over here don't offer a stick shift at all and many regular cars don't either.


Give me a stick any day of the week. In traffic or out
We've had automatics for over 60 years... some would say over 70 years...

My mom always had a stick til the car she has now... she liked driving sticks a lot.

She also has shoulder problems and decided her next car, the one she has now, should have an automatic with power steering and air conditioning... which she never had before.

Mom ordered a new Corolla S in 2001 and we were invited to the plant to watch her car being made... in all, we were at the factory more than 6 hours till it started for the first time and drove off the line... it's her only new car ever and she loves it and it's been 100% trouble freed with great mileage... 40+ mpg on trips.
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,691 posts, read 86,838,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post
From what I understand, cars with electronic fuel injection won't have enough power to actually get gas injected into the engine, if the battery is already too drained to run the starter motor.

At least that's what the AAA guy told s after we'd tried to do just that, and failed.
I'd say more likely a safety thing. Someone probably had the car in reverse one day and ran over the poor sucker who was pushing, or the guy who was pushing fell on his face after the car started and lurched forward, or something like that. There comes a point where yes the battery is too dead to get fuel to the system and/or produce a spark. But that point is pretty well beyond the first point where a starter won't turn. It takes a hell of a lot more energy to spin the crankshaft than to squirt droplets of fuel into the manifold. As long as the battery is in the "in between" stage you should still be able to push-start it.
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:44 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 38,320,873 times
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I'm still pretty amazed people have such a strong opinion on this. You want to drive a manual? Go ahead. You want to drive an automatic? Go ahead.
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Old 03-30-2011, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,616,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheViking85 View Post
From what I understand, cars with electronic fuel injection won't have enough power to actually get gas injected into the engine, if the battery is already too drained to run the starter motor.

At least that's what the AAA guy told s after we'd tried to do just that, and failed.
Actually, any car, carburetor or EFI, with a completely drained battery won't be able to be push started. And it has to do with the alternator. It needs to have its field coil energized before it can produce electricity. And without electricity, you have no spark.

Older cars (early 1960's and earlier) with a DC generator should be able to start, even with a 100% dead battery.
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Old 03-30-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
392 posts, read 1,262,918 times
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Regarding the original question on the differences between American and European drivers:




Some ideas as to why there's a difference:
  • The size of the vehicles: Europeans have traditionally driven smaller cars, which in the past have favored manual transmissions due to interior space, weight, and fuel economy. I think this is the main reason manuals are more common in Europe.
  • Use and need: It's very easy to get a license in the US. Plus, in most locations, owning a vehicle is a necessity. That means lots of people who take no pleasure in driving have to drive anyway. They will go for anything that makes driving and owning a vehicle easier. In Europe, it is more difficult, and I presume, expensive, to get a license and drive a car. In addition, it is easier to live in Europe without a car. So those people who would rather not drive have less incentive to own a vehicle.
  • Luxury: In the past, automatics were an expensive option. Americans expected a luxurious Lincoln to have an automatic, but not necessarily a Ford. So naturally, people aspired to driving a car with an automatic. That's not as true today. In fact, it's almost reversed. I don't know if Europeans considered automatics to be a luxurious option, but I suspect they focused on other upgrades.
  • Habit: Europeans are simply used to manuals, so they expect them. Americans are used to automatics, so they expect them.
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