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Old 12-31-2011, 03:32 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,975,432 times
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If it was all about racism, then why are upwardly-mobile black families moving to the suburbs? Why are Asian immigrants moving straight to the suburbs, skipping cities proper entirely?
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:32 PM
 
6,226 posts, read 6,849,644 times
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Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
I thought the reason was you could buy a bigger house with a bigger yard for less money and taxes than what could be bought in the city.
That was the reason. People got fed up with high costs that surpassed there income and being nickle and dimed to death by common hustlers and fat cat government bureaucrats lining their pocket. Blacks where left behind to pick the bones unfortunately.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:34 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,949,159 times
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Originally Posted by jmking View Post
That was the reason. People got fed up with high costs that surpassed there income and being nickle and dimed to death by common hustlers and fat cat government bureaucrats lining their pocke. Blacks where left behind to pick the bones unfortunately.
How nice that you can benefit from a city economy without paying city taxes. As long as you can tolerate the commute.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:36 PM
 
6,436 posts, read 9,964,776 times
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Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
The reason cities tend to have bad school districts is because the middle and upper classes fled.

Anyway, I phrased the title bad. Suburbs that embrace smart growth will thrive, along with cities. What we are seeing is the beginning of a decline of sprawl. Cities that focus on endless subdivisions, strip malls, and over reliance on the car will suffer.
Well it's been like for more than a few decades now and still growing. It's not going to suffer. Families will almost ALWAYS choose the suburbs where they can afford a house with space and go to good schools rather than the city. As long as there are families, the suburbs will thrive. So you have no case.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:43 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,949,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
[sprawl] still growing.
Can anyone verify or negate this with some actual data? I'm curious.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:56 PM
 
Location: The City
22,339 posts, read 32,187,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
Can anyone verify or negate this with some actual data? I'm curious.

Based on the weighted density of metros; all are getting lower suggesting continued sprawl. In fill is not keeping pace with expansion
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:57 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,949,159 times
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Based on the weighted density of metros; all are getting lower suggesting continued sprawl. In fill is not keeping pace with expansion
thanks
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Old 12-31-2011, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
1,309 posts, read 2,355,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zembonez View Post
WOW. Somebody needs to inform our local builders that suburbs are not successful. They are building them like crazy here and people are waiting to move in as soon as they are done.
I see you post often, so I know you're talking about Central Texas. I know what you mean-- development in the suburbs is still outpacing downtowns. I don't know about SA, but Austin is simultaneously building a strong, dense downtown. Just look at the Austonian, Austin 360, Spring Condos, etc. They're still selling strong, and I recently read that T. Stacy is getting ready to break ground on a couple new skyscrapers. Statesman just put out an article about the rebirth of the 2nd Street District which has added many amenities, you have Whole Foods Flagship store downtown, etc. I just hope that the new developments are mixed-use and not just residential.

My point being that while some suburbs are still growing, it's not necessarily at the expense of urban downtowns.
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Old 12-31-2011, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,643 posts, read 27,082,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Based on the weighted density of metros; all are getting lower suggesting continued sprawl. In fill is not keeping pace with expansion
Yep. The greatest example is maybe Atlanta. They have built so many condos, dense single family homes, and apartments in city between 2000 and 2010 that they believed their population increased from 416,000 to 530,000. Census thought so as well in each estimate. Yet, when the numbers came out, it showed the suburbs is by far still the attraction, not the city and the city of Atlanta increased to only 420,000. Same story for Dallas only increasing by a little less than 9,000. While it's neighbor, Fort Worth, increased by 200,000 because they offered more suburban living than Dallas did.
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Old 12-31-2011, 04:57 PM
 
Location: United State of Texas
1,708 posts, read 5,454,010 times
Reputation: 2108
Quote:
Originally Posted by wag more bark less View Post
I see you post often, so I know you're talking about Central Texas. I know what you mean-- development in the suburbs is still outpacing downtowns. I don't know about SA, but Austin is simultaneously building a strong, dense downtown. Just look at the Austonian, Austin 360, Spring Condos, etc. They're still selling strong, and I recently read that T. Stacy is getting ready to break ground on a couple new skyscrapers. Statesman just put out an article about the rebirth of the 2nd Street District which has added many amenities, you have Whole Foods Flagship store downtown, etc. I just hope that the new developments are mixed-use and not just residential.

My point being that while some suburbs are still growing, it's not necessarily at the expense of urban downtowns.
I'd have to agree. I love the development that is going on in Downtown Austin. Probably the most positive development inside the city in a few decades. I do see a ton of suburbs going up in all directions there though. Same for my area just outside SA.
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