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Old 01-29-2009, 12:18 PM
 
11,179 posts, read 22,394,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Kansas City is actually growing as is Minneapolis. Kansas City has little appeal as a place to live unless someone is from the KC metro area or one of the rural adjacent areas and moves to the big city to find work. While there are some people from other regions of the country that call KC home, I've met far fewer transplants from other regions here than any other metro area I've lived.
All of those low performers urban areas are growing...as they have been since their founding.

This is a wish list, although it obviously mirrors trends in actual moving. I'd give anything to move to Amsterdam, but it's probably not going to happen soon...
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Old 01-29-2009, 01:10 PM
 
419 posts, read 1,163,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
People are leaving the Northeaster region because they are overtaxed and the cost of living, utilities, insurance and doing business is extremely high except in a few of the rural areas of the region.

Kansas City is actually growing as is Minneapolis. Kansas City has little appeal as a place to live unless someone is from the KC metro area or one of the rural adjacent areas and moves to the big city to find work. While there are some people from other regions of the country that call KC home, I've met far fewer transplants from other regions here than any other metro area I've lived.
I find it unsurprising that KC is the list. I also find it unfortunate. KC has a lot to offer. A low cost of living, a decent amount of companies for jobs. A downtown that is growing, and a unique the short history.

It is improving all the time. But when people think of where they want to go, its not often they think of KC, or even the midwest (unless its Chicago)

Unfortunately KC has really bad sprawl and no public transit system...
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Old 01-29-2009, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Northern California
935 posts, read 1,717,079 times
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I'm not surprised to see people moving to Sacramento. Geographically, it has so much to offer. To the west there is San Francisco and wine country, to the East is the mountains, snow, and to the south is Yosemite. Sacramento itself has excellent weather, except for a few months in the summer when its scorching hot. The nightlife and art scene is decent. Plus, its a lot cheaper than the other major metros in the state.
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Old 01-29-2009, 01:27 PM
 
Location: IN
20,861 posts, read 35,987,118 times
Reputation: 13304
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
People are leaving the Northeaster region because they are overtaxed and the cost of living, utilities, insurance and doing business is extremely high except in a few of the rural areas of the region.

Kansas City is actually growing as is Minneapolis. Kansas City has little appeal as a place to live unless someone is from the KC metro area or one of the rural adjacent areas and moves to the big city to find work. While there are some people from other regions of the country that call KC home, I've met far fewer transplants from other regions here than any other metro area I've lived.
I completely agree with you. KC as well as most cities in the Lower Midwest do not appeal at all to transplants from other parts of the country. I have traveled to many parts of the country and have found KC to be lacking. I think many people stay in KC due to family, a good job, or they just don't travel that much to see what else is out there. If I had to move back to the Midwest again I would choose either Minneapolis or Chicago without a doubt. Those two cities have much more to offer overall.
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Old 01-29-2009, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,401,900 times
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I'm a little surprised of Denver being so high, I'd think it would be more in the middle of the list.
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Old 01-29-2009, 02:38 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,340,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetclimber View Post
That is a crappy analysis by that survey. Are they seriously trying to convince us that people would rather live in Phoenix, Portland, Sacramento, Orlando and Tampa over NYC, Boston and Chicago or even Houston? HAHA, ROTFLMAO!!!!
Makes sense to me. With the exception of Houston, those cities have above-average costs of living and these days, cost of living is a BIG factor.
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Old 01-29-2009, 03:09 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,017 posts, read 102,674,652 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
There are some interesting some of the results from different categories such as city preference based on income, education, age, party affiliation, ideology, etc...

http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pd...tisfaction.pdf

Only 14% of people who make over $100K want to live in LA vs 33% who make less than $30K. So it looks like not even wealthier people want to live in LA.

Both Denver and San Diego beat out SF, Boston, and Seattle for the percentage of college grads who prefer those cities, which kind of surprised me given each cities reputation.

A slightly higher % of democrats preferred San Diego over San Francisco, another surprise given each cities political repuatations.

A higher percentage of republicans wanted to live with like minded people compared to democrats, 35% vs 24%.

pretty interesting report when you look at it....
What kind of rep does Denver have? It has long had one of the highest rates of college educated adults.
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Old 01-29-2009, 03:33 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,441,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What kind of rep does Denver have? It has long had one of the highest rates of college educated adults.
I guess I was thinking more about the reputation the other cities have. SF, Boston, and Seattle imo are seen kind of havens of intellectualism and where college grads like to relocate, at least more so than Denver or SD imo. SD kind of has a reputation of people not being very smart despite it being in the Top 10 cities for % of people with college degrees. Not that Denver has a bad rep or anything, just figured some other cities might be more popular with that demographic. But 'Sweetclimber' could be onto something, those other cities tend to be saturated with talent so maybe college grads are looking for a less competitive and cheaper city. Plus if you like the outdoors those two have very good reputations for that.
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Old 01-29-2009, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,608 posts, read 20,731,073 times
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One thing to keep in mind here-- this list ranks where people say they want to live, not where people are actually moving to in the largest numbers.

I am surprised that Denver makes number 1. And being born and raised there and wanting to come back, I am a little disturbed.
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Old 01-29-2009, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
8,900 posts, read 13,252,967 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bowie View Post
Considering the strong preference for warm-weather cities, I was thinking that the survey had probably been conducted in the dead of winter. Turns out the survey was done from Oct. 3-19, 2008.


Umm, I wouldn't say there's a strong preference for warm-weather cities. Plenty of people in the north like the cold. They move because it's getting too expensive, mostly.
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