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Old 11-23-2012, 01:29 PM
 
1,594 posts, read 3,404,568 times
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That Route 1/Route 3 intersection in Belfast is a nightmare, I agree. When the state put the bypass around Belfast in the early 1960s, they ended up rebuilding the intersection at least three times because it was so darned dangerous. We called it Crash Corner, and there was more than one fatality there. Local folks go out of their way to avoid the intersection. But once you get away from that spot, Belfast is actually pretty nice.

The original Reny's store is in Damariscotta -- there are actually two of them, a "regular" Reny's on one side of Main Street and "Reny's Underground" in a basement on the other side of Main Street. Bob Reny started it back in 1949, and in the winter he sold goods door-to-door because the local farmers didn't get to town that often because of the weather. (There was a LOT more snow in those days, and far fewer plows.) Worth a visit if you're exploring that region. I'm partial to the Reny's in Bath myself, but that's just personal preference, I think.

As for affordable rentals, you might be better off looking at inland towns such as Union, Searsmont, Washington, and Warren, or perhaps the back side of West Rockport. Without reading all six pages of responses, you've probably heard that already, but just in case ...
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Old 11-23-2012, 02:01 PM
 
1,594 posts, read 3,404,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
My only concern about the driving is that I have to get up at the crack of dawn and what if the plows aren't out yet?

Sure, in towns they may have been but what about all along Route 1? All 65 miles I have to drive?
I drove 50 miles each way every day on Route 1 for more than 15 years, and the DOT was usually very good about keeping the road clear. My major problem was ice storms. Ice is the only good reason to have studded snow tires IMHO.
Quote:
What about those hills I have to go up...what if I get stuck behind someone who is driving like a snail up those hills and I lose traction? (These people can't drive when there's NOTHING on the roads...now we are talking about adding snow and ice to the same roads?)

Those sharp curves....even going slow, throw in a patch of ice, could be serious issues. Would winter tires help in that regard? Of course one should drive much slower and use way more caution but again, those hills and some of those sharp curves on route 1...yah, they do concern me in winter time.

But, again, I am not sure I'm going to have the means to get winter tires in time. I have all season...mud and snow...I guess that's the same? I don't know, I have mud and snow tires. But they are not winter tires.

Last year, during our "mild" winter, I was at a stop light, it turned green, I was making a left turn and even though I took off slowly, I still skidded. You can see why I might be a little anxious about the hills and sharp curves.

Also keep in mind, my vehicle is VERY light even if I throw a couple buckets of cat litter in the back to add some weight.

What will this winter be like? Some have told me it will be mild, like last year, some have told me we are supposed to expect horrible conditions this year. It's definitely something on my mind.
Go to Lowe's or Home Depot or your local hardware store and pick up two bags of "tube sand." You'll have to ask for help, because they're heavy. Put one on each side of your trunk. I use them for my rear-wheel-drive pickup truck and they really make a difference. They also make a real difference in your gas mileage but everything is a trade-off.

IMHO moving closer to your new job sooner rather than later, even if you have to borrow money or rent a place that doesn't meet all your needs, will only benefit you. A 65-mile commute means more than a high gasoline bill -- it's wear and tear on the car, tires, oil changes, more repairs, etc., as well as wear and tear on YOU. Until you've done it, you have no idea how tiring and demanding it is to drive an hour and half on a two-lane highway. If I had it to do over again, I would never have taken the job that put me on the road for more than two hours a day. Even though I was making a darned good salary, when I added up all the extra expenses as well as what it cost in time away from my family, I'd have been better off taking a lower-paying job closer to home.
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Old 11-23-2012, 08:06 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 2,939,800 times
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I remeber back in the 80s the Ellsworth and Bar Harbor PD had Volvo sedan police caes.
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Old 11-24-2012, 12:36 AM
 
17,159 posts, read 22,167,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 8635angelvalley View Post
I remeber back in the 80s the Ellsworth and Bar Harbor PD had Volvo sedan police caes.
augusta had those too, still have a vivid, (not so good) memory of one 27 yrs ago

the reasoning, was they'd go a couple hundred thousand miles
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Old 11-24-2012, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,487 posts, read 6,426,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coaster View Post
I drove 50 miles each way every day on Route 1 for more than 15 years, and the DOT was usually very good about keeping the road clear. My major problem was ice storms. Ice is the only good reason to have studded snow tires IMHO.

Go to Lowe's or Home Depot or your local hardware store and pick up two bags of "tube sand." You'll have to ask for help, because they're heavy. Put one on each side of your trunk. I use them for my rear-wheel-drive pickup truck and they really make a difference. They also make a real difference in your gas mileage but everything is a trade-off.
Here's a little trick my drivers use: Put a container of sand on the passenger side floor where the heater will blow on it- the warm sand will melt into the ice a little bit, then freeze, which will then give you a bit of traction.
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Old 11-24-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Out West
20,608 posts, read 15,424,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
Here's a little trick my drivers use: Put a container of sand on the passenger side floor where the heater will blow on it- the warm sand will melt into the ice a little bit, then freeze, which will then give you a bit of traction.
???

I'm so confused by this. Melt the ice where? On the road? What? While I'm driving?
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Old 11-24-2012, 09:18 AM
 
1,594 posts, read 3,404,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
???

I'm so confused by this. Melt the ice where? On the road? What? While I'm driving?
If you get stuck on a patch of ice, spread the warm sand on the ice in front of the drive wheels. It melts into the ice and then refreezes into the surface of the ice very quickly, giving better traction then loose sand.
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Old 11-24-2012, 09:46 AM
 
17,159 posts, read 22,167,733 times
Reputation: 31228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
???

I'm so confused by this. Melt the ice where? On the road? What? While I'm driving?

as coaster said, if you do get spinning on ice or snow...throw some sand/dirt in front of the tires for some traction....
it does work.
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Old 11-24-2012, 11:54 AM
 
776 posts, read 1,032,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
augusta had those too, still have a vivid, (not so good) memory of one 27 yrs ago
:giggle
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Old 11-24-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Out West
20,608 posts, read 15,424,228 times
Reputation: 24166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coaster View Post
If you get stuck on a patch of ice, spread the warm sand on the ice in front of the drive wheels. It melts into the ice and then refreezes into the surface of the ice very quickly, giving better traction then loose sand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
as coaster said, if you do get spinning on ice or snow...throw some sand/dirt in front of the tires for some traction....
it does work.
How does warm sand, "melt in to the ice" if it's inside your car on the passenger floor board?
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