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Old Yesterday, 08:27 AM
 
81 posts, read 71,360 times
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I used to live in NH for 23 years and am now in WI where I grew up and my property tax is lower than NH was for same size house----but with an income tax and a sales tax my tax burden is way higher than it was in NH so watch what you wish for. I agree Aldi is nice but they never have everything I need and spend more time shopping twice. That being said I do miss NH and would return if I could.
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Old Yesterday, 08:44 AM
 
Location: IN
20,296 posts, read 34,773,045 times
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Originally Posted by thebig0 View Post
Always strange to me how much people complain about property taxes. We have a 2000 square ft house on a couple of acres that backs up to thousands of conservation acres. We pay slightly over $5k in taxes to the town/state but that is it. In exchange for our $5k we get well maintained roads, an educated populous, ample state parks, police, fire, emergency response and abundant opportunity for employment. Sounds like a great deal to me. Sure, if we chose to eat out, choose to consume tobacco, choose to stay in a hotel, etc we pay more but all are choices. The federal government absonds with roughly an order of magnitude greater than local and provides what? An army? From my perspective, the anger is misplaced.

And i cannot understand the appeal of aldi, they dont have everything you need and who has time to split their groceries between multiple stores?
In general, property taxes are reasonable enough for the towns that have relatively high levels of median household income. However, for retirees that are on more of a budget- the Lakes Region is a better value. For Moultonboro, the property taxes would be under $2K for a house near $250K in value. Also, yearly taxes for just land parcels alone with no buildings on it are much more reasonable due to the low equalized tax rate. Roads, schools, and other amenities are all above average. Conservation areas are abundant with Red Hill owned by the Lakes Region Conservation Trust with trails that go up to the fire tower. Also, Ossipee Mountain trails are by Castle in the Clouds in town that lead up to the top of Mt. Shaw.
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Old Yesterday, 11:51 AM
 
423 posts, read 372,426 times
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Income tax is a tax on production. RE taxes are a tax on consumption. To me that is a very important distinction.
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Old Yesterday, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Anaheim
1,840 posts, read 3,334,294 times
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Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
It's a totally different chain than whatever used to be in California. It's an old Mass.-based company and used to be solely in Mass. (often under the family name Demoulas - that's what I grew up calling it), but now they're in NH (seem to open new stores here frequently) and there is at least one in Maine.


Edit to add - People like it because of the prices, and the newest locations are pretty nice as far as basic grocery stores go. But unless people are extremely supermarket-deprived, it's not the sort of grocery store people travel to for the "experience." (In contrast to, say, a Wegmans.) Many of them are pretty dreary, in fact.
The ones in California were part of Kroger, which has Ralphs as well.
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Old Yesterday, 02:29 PM
KCZ
 
1,600 posts, read 811,134 times
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Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Income tax is a tax on production. RE taxes are a tax on consumption. To me that is a very important distinction.

Income taxes are a tax on sweat. RE taxes in NH are monetary transfers to people with children.
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Old Yesterday, 06:01 PM
 
640 posts, read 972,215 times
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Originally Posted by KCZ View Post
RE taxes in NH are monetary transfers to people with children.

Yes, but, that's not the fault of people who have children, and NH is in dire need of younger residents. The way of funding education is ridiculous and unsustainable, and the costs of education are also totally out of control. If there were no other component to property taxes except local and state education, our annual taxes would still be over $5500, and we have a modest house. Doable now while working, much more difficult when retired.


One could also say that property taxes are taxes on wealth, except that in most cases, the "wealth" is actually partially or even mostly held by a bank, not by the "owner" of the property.
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Old Yesterday, 06:25 PM
 
1,032 posts, read 866,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
the costs of education are also totally out of control.
This is the root of the problem. Until this is fixed no amount of creating, shifting, or disguising taxes is going to improve anyone's standard of living. Only getting the cost under control will help. If you don't believe that, find a resident of Connecticut and ask them how well creating an income tax has worked out for them.

Until costs are contained, there are beautiful towns in NH with low taxes. There are states that have allocated their tax burden differently. Choose whatever works best for your own situation. Turning New Hampshire into a high tax state isn't the answer.
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Old Today, 12:23 PM
 
640 posts, read 972,215 times
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Originally Posted by jdhpa View Post
This is the root of the problem. Until this is fixed no amount of creating, shifting, or disguising taxes is going to improve anyone's standard of living. Only getting the cost under control will help. If you don't believe that, find a resident of Connecticut and ask them how well creating an income tax has worked out for them.

Until costs are contained, there are beautiful towns in NH with low taxes. There are states that have allocated their tax burden differently. Choose whatever works best for your own situation. Turning New Hampshire into a high tax state isn't the answer.

I'm definitely not advocating for an income tax. I agree a major part of the solution is cutting costs, I just don't see that happening. The only time that seems to happen is in very property-poor towns with low-income residents. When people get truly desperate, they are willing to cut back on education, but they can only cut so much in the current system and it barely makes a dent on the tax rates in those town. I do continue to think that funding education entirely on the backs of property owners (and yes, indirectly, renters... but they pay much less) is not a sustainable system but I can't think of a "better" way to tax.

The problem with many of the low-tax towns is that the home prices are higher than elsewhere (though not always by a huge amount), and if people are looking at their bottom line now, rather than down the line when their mortgage is paid off, they might feel it's not worth it. (Although, I'd rather be paying a higher mortgage than money to the town/state which I will never get back.) And, a lot of them aren't close to many jobs (or to someone's current job which may be a great and stable job.) There are definitely situations which will work out for some people, though. And in those cases it's amazing to see the difference in taxes one family versus another might pay.
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