U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-01-2015, 05:49 AM
 
Location: NYPD"s 30th Precinct
2,420 posts, read 4,214,687 times
Reputation: 2446

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sha83 View Post
I'm not sure about the second part. Race somehow dictates where you want to live?
It's sociology 101 that, on a broad level, human beings prefer to surround themselves with others who have similar backgrounds, experiences, languages, culture, etc... It's a logical extension of this that yes, many people will prefer to live in neighborhoods predominately populated by other members of their own race.

There are of course plenty of factors that go into deciding where to live, but it's naive to think that the demographics of a neighborhood isn't one of them for many people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2015, 07:32 AM
 
Location: downtown
1,826 posts, read 1,159,514 times
Reputation: 408
cause it IS.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2015, 02:07 PM
 
23,306 posts, read 16,175,014 times
Reputation: 8581
Quote:
Originally Posted by gqa View Post
Come on people. I wish NYC wasn't so segregated but it is. I grew up in Bkyln and now live in Queens. JUST because people of different races may live amongst each other MAY mean that particular area has diversity but that doesn't mean these people mingle and associate with each other. So often you'll see people of different races walk by people of other races and not even say Good morning but speak to people only like them. How many of you have had someone of a completely opposite race over for dinner? Gone to their house for dinner? Segregation is so bad here that when myself and one of my co-workers of another race became best friends and hung out together a lot people either thought we were gay or cops. SMH.

Nothing warms my heart more than to see people hanging out from different races having a good time and treating each other as equals. Even more so when they can live together in a neighborhood and work together and respect each other as equals. I'm not sating that it doesn't exist in NYC but it very hard to find. I think too many people are quick to believe the worst in others from what they see on the media and generalize the entire race rather than get to know them personally. And that goes both ways!
That is not segregation. Segregation is when people are denied housing, employment, or educational opportunities because of their race.

I'm from Central Queens. Yes you'll tend to see East Asians among East Asians, Russians among Russians, Latinos among Latinos, and South Asians among South Asians in the same neighborhood. Is it segregation? No! Many of these people are talking to people that they have linguistic connections to (it's not just a racial connection but linguistic one as well).

I do have friends of all races, and I've had lovers of all races, but if you saw me with my family you'd see me with all Black people. That is NOT segregation. Just because you see a bunch of people together of any race does not necessarily make it bad. It's an issue IF they are actively discriminating against others and denying them opportunity.

With that said you have really dumb coworkers. It's not that rare to see people with friends or lovers of another race in NYC.

So to sum it up, segregation is we won't allow people of this race to live in this neighborhood, work at this job, etc. It isn't 5 people of the same race going to a restaurant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 06:09 PM
gqa
 
175 posts, read 106,389 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
That is not segregation. Segregation is when people are denied housing, employment, or educational opportunities because of their race.

I'm from Central Queens. Yes you'll tend to see East Asians among East Asians, Russians among Russians, Latinos among Latinos, and South Asians among South Asians in the same neighborhood. Is it segregation? No! Many of these people are talking to people that they have linguistic connections to (it's not just a racial connection but linguistic one as well).

I do have friends of all races, and I've had lovers of all races, but if you saw me with my family you'd see me with all Black people. That is NOT segregation. Just because you see a bunch of people together of any race does not necessarily make it bad. It's an issue IF they are actively discriminating against others and denying them opportunity.

With that said you have really dumb coworkers. It's not that rare to see people with friends or lovers of another race in NYC.

So to sum it up, segregation is we won't allow people of this race to live in this neighborhood, work at this job, etc. It isn't 5 people of the same race going to a restaurant.

I thought this discussion was about NYC BEING segregated and not institutionalized (forced) segregation. That's another whole discussion.

The article in USA today I mentioned in my 1st post talked about how people in NYC work together but go home to separate communities and don't do much together afterward. Remember it listed NYC as the #1 segregated city. This helps build bias, stereotypes, and even hatred of other races when you don't learn about other people and their culture first hand, instead hearing things from other people and the news or media.

Things are getting better as many of the younger generations are not accepting the racial bias their parents have or had. I personally love meeting people of different cultures because only experiencing people of my culture gets boring after awhile. lol. That's why my wife and I love traveling in and out of America. On our bucket list is to visit all 50 states. So far its been fun and we have met many people not like us who are just wonderful!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 06:27 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,626,691 times
Reputation: 5950
Quote:
Originally Posted by gqa View Post
NYC is racially segregated. Even USA Today had an article ranking the most segregated cities in America and NYC was #1. Don't be fooled. People are forced to work with other races but they go back to their own communities. With the exception of some of the newly gentrified neighborhoods you hardly see much co-mingling after hours.

Some races are more ignorant than others when it comes to co-mingling. Some are very open minded and some are very close minded. They're not interested in accepting or getting to now other types of people because of how they were raised. You can tell the usual types from this forum who don't care how nice, professional, and peaceful a person can be. All they see is race or hear diversity and they don't want to have nothing to do with it.
Just because a newspaper claims that NYC is the most segregated city doesn't mean it's true

How exactly is it the "most" segregated? Sure a lot of people stick to their own, but a lot of people intermingle as well. I doubt any other major cities in the country are less segregated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 06:35 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,626,691 times
Reputation: 5950
Quote:
Originally Posted by penny1969 View Post
Flatbush Ave, in Brooklyn. It's like THE BERLIN WALL.

Plus how many places - anywhere, for that matter - do you see the races living together and intermarrying? New York thinks it's "integrated" but everywhere I went people seem to hold onto for dear life, that idea that every group "belongs on their own SIDE." As if, "it's fine to work together on Manhattan but then you go home to "your side" where you "belong." Crap like that was said to me by a Jewish guy who claims he LIKES me. I have to point out, over and over again, because he's fairly dense and stupid, that if HIS WAY was the way then we wouldn't have lived in the same HOSTEL and would have never MET. Duh. So much for "every" Jewish person having a brain, eh? (Fortunately, in spite of New York I don't buy into stereotypes!)
Some older blue collar white people might still have a mindset like that, but I wouldn't say it's the norm for the city.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gqa View Post
NYC is racially segregated. Even USA Today had an article ranking the most segregated cities in America and NYC was #1. Don't be fooled. People are forced to work with other races but they go back to their own communities. With the exception of some of the newly gentrified neighborhoods you hardly see much co-mingling after hours.

Some races are more ignorant than others when it comes to co-mingling. Some are very open minded and some are very close minded. They're not interested in accepting or getting to now other types of people because of how they were raised. You can tell the usual types from this forum who don't care how nice, professional, and peaceful a person can be. All they see is race or hear diversity and they don't want to have nothing to do with it.
They're not segregated if they live in the same communities, on the same blocks, in the same apartment buildings, etc. Immigrants are more likely to associate with people who share a similar background due to cultural and linguistic barriers, but is it is quite common for their US born to children to hang out with people of many different backgrounds.

I'm a white American 20 year old guy in Long Island (which is less diverse than NYC) and my friend group is pretty diverse. And most people I know in NYC seem to have similar experiences.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 06:40 PM
gqa
 
175 posts, read 106,389 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Just because a newspaper claims that NYC is the most segregated city doesn't mean it's true

How exactly is it the "most" segregated? Sure a lot of people stick to their own, but a lot of people intermingle as well. I doubt any other major cities in the country are less segregated.
It wasn't just a baseless claim. It did a study with demographics and numbers and the likes. I believe it was in 2012. Look it up and make you own assumption.

From this thread alone many people agree. It also is a very subjective argument because some think on the terms of physical segregation as in where people live. Some think it if you go to a bar and there's people of different races its not segregated. Others feel the city is very diverse but there is very little getting of REALLY to know other people and cultures. From this board some are still opposed to that and believe you better stay on your side of the tracks. Only up until the recent years with have things gotten better or are changing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 06:48 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,626,691 times
Reputation: 5950
Quote:
Originally Posted by gqa View Post
It wasn't just a baseless claim. It did a study with demographics and numbers and the likes. I believe it was in 2012. Look it up and make you own assumption.

From this thread alone many people agree. It also is a very subjective argument because some think on the terms of physical segregation as in where people live. Some think it if you go to a bar and there's people of different races its not segregated. Others feel the city is very diverse but there is very little getting of REALLY to know other people and cultures. From this board some are still opposed to that and believe you better stay on your side of the tracks. Only up until the recent years with have things gotten better or are changing.
Perhaps it was based solely on black and white segregation, but NYC has a lot of people who are neither black or white.

There are large swaths of NYC where one racial group dominates, but many, if not most neighborhoods seem to have a sizable presence of at least two ethnic groups. Is the same true for most other big cities on the East Coast, or even in the country?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 07:13 PM
 
23,306 posts, read 16,175,014 times
Reputation: 8581
Quote:
Originally Posted by gqa View Post
I thought this discussion was about NYC BEING segregated and not institutionalized (forced) segregation. That's another whole discussion.

The article in USA today I mentioned in my 1st post talked about how people in NYC work together but go home to separate communities and don't do much together afterward. Remember it listed NYC as the #1 segregated city. This helps build bias, stereotypes, and even hatred of other races when you don't learn about other people and their culture first hand, instead hearing things from other people and the news or media.

Things are getting better as many of the younger generations are not accepting the racial bias their parents have or had. I personally love meeting people of different cultures because only experiencing people of my culture gets boring after awhile. lol. That's why my wife and I love traveling in and out of America. On our bucket list is to visit all 50 states. So far its been fun and we have met many people not like us who are just wonderful!!
Segregation is always institutional! Recent Chinese immigrants hanging out with other Chinese immigrants (partially because they speak the same language) is not segregation. Now denying people opportunities in terms of housing, employment, or education because of race, ethnicity, or gender is segregation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2015, 07:14 PM
 
23,306 posts, read 16,175,014 times
Reputation: 8581
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Some older blue collar white people might still have a mindset like that, but I wouldn't say it's the norm for the city.

They're not segregated if they live in the same communities, on the same blocks, in the same apartment buildings, etc. Immigrants are more likely to associate with people who share a similar background due to cultural and linguistic barriers, but is it is quite common for their US born to children to hang out with people of many different backgrounds.

I'm a white American 20 year old guy in Long Island (which is less diverse than NYC) and my friend group is pretty diverse. And most people I know in NYC seem to have similar experiences.
Agreed. It's also common for their US born children to marry people outside of their parents ethnic group.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > New York City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top