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Old 01-12-2012, 11:54 AM
 
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I frequently give BabyGirl toast with PB on it for breakfast or peanut butter cereals (like HN Cherries) in the car on the way to the gym..

Is she "dangerous" to any other children at the Kid's Klub that have allergies? I have to admit I've never given PB allergies much thought.

One year, DH bought peanut M&M's for trick-or-treaters and I didn't have those out but he had already dumped them in with the other candy and stireed them up a bit. I wondered if that was enough to contamintate the other candies but figured if someone had kids with severe allergies they wouldn't be trick-or-treating anyway?

My DH has bee sting allergies so I end up carrying a epi-pen for him when we're out in about - I honestly can't say what I'd do if I saw a child having a reaction....
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
And hence my use of the word majority. This also reinforces that it is crucial to have school nurses in all schools. Relying on teachers to make a diagnosis is exceedingly dangerous.
I would agree that we should have nurses in all schools! However, I still have a bit of a problem with the vomiting claim in the "majority" of severe cases. I have never seen that claim anywhere during the 11 years I have been studying information about allergies. Sure-- vomiting MAY occur--and if it did during an allergic reaction, an Epipen shot would be great!

More importantly, I really disagree with all this talk about giving the child an Epipen shot as potentially too dangerous. The real danger is in NOT giving the shot. I really work hard to ensure people do not fear the Epipen shot. I am a huge fan of teacher training as well.

For kids who have known allergies, like my daughter, I would much rather them be given an Epipen shot when they don't need it than not at all. The side effects are absolutely not dangerous for the vast majority of people. The latest article on cnn.com has quotes from experts, which puts this all in better perspective:

Girl's death highlights allergy safety in schools - CNN.com

I am not saying all these things just to be difficult. In order for my daughter to be safe, I work hard to dispel misinformation and to inform people who care for her. I would like them to know my daughter probably won't vomit during a reaction and that they can give her an Epipen shot in the thigh. Inaction is the real danger since minutes count during a reaction.
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: IL
12,945 posts, read 10,718,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellar View Post
I would agree that we should have nurses in all schools! However, I still have a bit of a problem with the vomiting claim in the "majority" of severe cases. I have never seen that claim anywhere during the 11 years I have been studying information about allergies. Sure-- vomiting MAY occur--and if it did during an allergic reaction, an Epipen shot would be great!

More importantly, I really disagree with all this talk about giving the child an Epipen shot as potentially too dangerous. The real danger is in NOT giving the shot. I really work hard to ensure people do not fear the Epipen shot. I am a huge fan of teacher training as well.

For kids who have known allergies, like my daughter, I would much rather them be given an Epipen shot when they don't need it than not at all. The side effects are absolutely not dangerous for the vast majority of people. The latest article on cnn.com has quotes from experts, which puts this all in better perspective:

Girl's death highlights allergy safety in schools - CNN.com

I am not saying all these things just to be difficult. In order for my daughter to be safe, I work hard to dispel misinformation and to inform people who care for her. I would like them to know my daughter probably won't vomit during a reaction and that they can give her an Epipen shot in the thigh. Inaction is the real danger since minutes count during a reaction.
You are cherry-picking from 9 pages of posts, most out of context.

The points you are focusing on were in response to non-trained, non-educated people making determinations of whether they were dealing with a food allergy or not. And non-trained, non-educated people giving Epi-Pen. I was not talking about school nurses, nor was I talking about educated parents, or educated teachers, I was talking about people with no exposure and no specific education in food allergies.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
I was talking about severe allergic reactions to food. The majority of which are pre-empted by vomiting.



Yes indeed that is true. You are taking my posts out of context. When I was talking about non-medical people giving Epi-Pens, it was in reference to the proposal that there be stock of Epi-Pen in schools in case children who had no authorization or medications of their own needed them. We were discussing who would make the determination that a child with no prior knowledge was indeed having an allergic reaction, and who would give the Epi-Pen.
That is my concern as well. This is a PRESCRIPTION medication, and as such, intended for the recipient. Would it also not be dosed properly for that person's weight or whatever? Also your other post that speaks of the risk of giving it incorrectly or to the wrong student makes this proposal suspect to me.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:10 PM
Status: "Fall is here!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,334 posts, read 90,834,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NEOhioBound View Post
I am confused by this part "The girl had received a peanut from another child unaware of Ammaria's allergy, police said" from the story. They, the media, are trying to blame the girl who gave the child the peanut, but at 7yrs old, the child should have know she couldn't touch them let alone eat them

And then this "When it comes to a life-threatening allergic reaction, it's so simple to save that life," said Maria Acebal, chief executive officer of the Fairfax, Va.-based Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network, which championed the bill. "I have no doubt that the school where this little girl went had an EpiPen in the office -- it just didn't have Ammaria's name on it." So, what if they used someone else epi- than that child needed it? Why didn't this little girls mother have the epi-pen for her?

I do believe that there are true allergies, but I also believe that a lot of them are not as severe as both parents and doctors make it seem. Food sensitivies I will buy, but I have a hard time buying the "A well-regarded national study published in the journal Pediatrics this past summer estimated that 8 percent of children — that’s 5.9 million kids — suffer from food allergies.

The report also found that close to 40 percent of those children suffer severe reactions." as posted here: New peanut butter Cheerios triggers anger from parents

By the media and medical field creating hype of allergies and parents getting fearful and keeping their children away from certain foods even way before being diagnosed with any kind of allergy, all we are doing is creating more kids from becoming allergic to ingredients. We need to go back to the day when it was ok to play in the dirt and not have to anti-bacterial products in everything. Do you know how hard it is to find anti-bacterial soap anymore? Ugh

As for this "There is no cure for food allergies" That is not true, well exactly. Some doctors have started therapy to build up immunities against the allergen by injected into the body (via shots, food, liquid, ect) in small doses and increasing the dose over a period of time depending on the person reacted. I actually have seen two shows about it and was surprised how well a man overcame severe allergy to shellfood

JMHO
Re: the teal-how is this woman sure of what she said? Did she go into the health room and look? Or is this just a way to blame the school and school policy, which, BTW is the legal policy?

This whole story is just sad, very sad.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:35 PM
 
Location: here
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
I think that if your kid allergies (or you have) allergies, you have to be responisble for your own safety. I would be sure my kid had his/her own epipen, and I would be sure that they never ate anything that didn't come from home. I'm not sure about this case- did the mom not provide an epipen? Was she counting on the school to provide one for her? If that's the case, the child's death is her mom's fault- the school is NOT in the business of providing epipens for whomever needs one!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucidkitty View Post
I think the bigger question is why the childs mother didn't have the child carrying this with her.
You can't have a child carrying their own epi-pen all over school, to lunch, out to recess. That just isn't practical or safe. Even if she had it, would the recess teacher have known it was on her, or known what to do with it?

This is just such a sad story. It seems both avoidable and inevitable at the same time.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:45 PM
 
1,677 posts, read 1,780,603 times
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What happened to those Medic Alert bracelets and necklaces that people with life threatening illnesses wear? My mom used to wear one, in case she was ever unconscious or unresponsive, emergency personnel would know what was wrong and what she needed. I think if a child has an allergy that is that severe, they should be required to wear one for their own safety. That way, there can be no mistaking what the problem is and if the epi-pen is appropriate. I sure would get one for my child if she had a life threatening allergy.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:46 PM
 
Location: here
23,529 posts, read 25,849,293 times
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Originally Posted by AnnaNomus View Post
What happened to those Medic Alert bracelets and necklaces that people with life threatening illnesses wear? My mom used to wear one, in case she was ever unconscious or unresponsive, emergency personnel would know what was wrong and what she needed. I think if a child has an allergy that is that severe, they should be required to wear one for their own safety. That way, there can be no mistaking what the problem is and if the epi-pen is appropriate. I sure would get one for my child if she had a life threatening allergy.
Very good question! I had a couple classmates with those. I haven't seen them lately, and I know several kids with food allergies.

http://www.medicalert.org/shop/shopHome.htm
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:54 PM
 
Location: IL
12,945 posts, read 10,718,720 times
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My son wears one.
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:00 PM
 
10,805 posts, read 8,116,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaNomus View Post
What happened to those Medic Alert bracelets and necklaces that people with life threatening illnesses wear? My mom used to wear one, in case she was ever unconscious or unresponsive, emergency personnel would know what was wrong and what she needed. I think if a child has an allergy that is that severe, they should be required to wear one for their own safety. That way, there can be no mistaking what the problem is and if the epi-pen is appropriate. I sure would get one for my child if she had a life threatening allergy.
Give this lady a prize. This makes the most sense.
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