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Old 02-24-2010, 07:30 PM
 
28,231 posts, read 39,872,938 times
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We are aggressively looking for a retirement locale where we can own and use a swimming pool for most of the year. We both enjoy swimming and find it to be great exercise, without the impact problems of other types, including walking. We both have hip problems, hers from having a horse fall on her, mine from being hit by a car (I was young, but I don't think it was some crazed 95 year-old woman). We are also experiencing knee problems and I have some residual affects (effects? - I'm usually better with these two) from Polio. We are planning on a ranch house and expect to have a hard time with stairs, etc. A pool seems like a good solution.

I got a chuckle from the 95 year-old driver comment since our state is currently in the process of restricting teen age drivers because of numerous accidents and fatalities.

We take vitamins and a supplement called Epicor which boosts the immune system. It seems to be working except for my bout with Shingles last year. I haven't had a serious cold or flu since we started taking it, and I'm one to catch everything that goes around.

Hobbies are a good way to stay young as is working puzzles like crosswords (do the NYT every day) and reading. We play games (board dice, card and video) and feel they all help.
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Old 02-24-2010, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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I wouldn't want to be young again. Been there done that. I don't mind looking 64 because I am 64. I don't need to be young again. I don't think I want to think as I did when I was 20. I was an idiot! As long as a person keeps growing mentally and emotionally, that will make life worthwhile despite the aches and wrinkles.

I do want to be as healthy as possible.
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Old 02-24-2010, 10:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MN2CO View Post
Many of us would agree with your assessment of some of the younger age people of today, but that isn't what we are talking about when Newenglandgirl, I and others speak of staying young (mentally). It's that ole sourpuss, grumpy, complaining, judgemental, close-minded and refusal to accept change that I am referring to.
Which is why I concluded: In my opinion the stereotypical sour old person, is as often as not the one who never moved beyond the callowness of youth...and not surprisingly finds life a bitter disappointment, having missed most of it.
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Old 02-24-2010, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
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I've started eating a lot more vegetables and fruit. After you get used to it then you start to feel a bit better. I really increased my exercise too. It's important to stay healthy as you age.

I stretch,walk ,yoga, and jog just a little.
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Old 02-25-2010, 02:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
I've started eating a lot more vegetables and fruit. After you get used to it then you start to feel a bit better.
It took me awhile to get honest on this score, and to really have a daily intake of fresh fruits and salads. But once it became a routine, it really did make some positive difference in my level of well-being...plus lots more fish and poultry, and virtually no beef or pork.

Quote:
I really increased my exercise too. It's important to stay healthy as you age.

I stretch,walk ,yoga, and jog just a little.
When I was younger, i.e. middle aged, I was good about it. But then I had an accident, which side-tracked me with pain and limited motion for about four years. When I was able to get the corrective surgery that was needed, I was very slow to get back into a routine of regular exercise.

But as my family's hereditary RA and arterial sclerosis entered my life, I realized that I needed to get on the stick and work out something that addressed both problems or I would be in big trouble sooner rather than later. It also took awhile to accept that if I am not up to doing what I ordinarily do for exercise that this shouldn't become an excuse to do nothing; so I have alternative forms of exercise to fall back on...and to vary things with.
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Old 02-26-2010, 02:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I've been enjoying all the retirement threads but don't see much about staying young and healthy past the age of 50 or 60. Maybe we can give each other some ideas on this thread....
It seems to be a fairly well accepted idea that one of the best ways to keep the brain functioning well, injecting new zest into one's life and staying (or becoming) a more open and expansive person is to bring some strong innovations into one's life, especially as one ages.

Based on my own observations this seems to be true.

I'd be interesting in hearing how people in their fifites and beyond may have introduced some innovations into their lives that were quite out of their own sense of the ordinary, or their habitual range of interests or normal lifestyle.
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Old 02-26-2010, 04:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
It seems to be a fairly well accepted idea that one of the best ways to keep the brain functioning well, injecting new zest into one's life and staying (or becoming) a more open and expansive person is to bring some strong innovations into one's life, especially as one ages.

Based on my own observations this seems to be true.

I'd be interesting in hearing how people in their fifites and beyond may have introduced some innovations into their lives that were quite out of their own sense of the ordinary, or their habitual range of interests or normal lifestyle.
I never would have imagined that at the age of 55 I'd be spending 2 years in Uganda! My dh is the one who volunteered and I went along willingly although my first reaction was 'are you insane'? The experience gave me an appreciation of what I have.

I didn't really become adventurous at all until my late 40's. I finally realized I wouldn't live forever, so I might as well take chances. It's better than being safe and bored.
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Old 02-26-2010, 07:53 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Originally Posted by yankinscotland View Post
I never would have imagined that at the age of 55 I'd be spending 2 years in Uganda! My dh is the one who volunteered and I went along willingly although my first reaction was 'are you insane'? The experience gave me an appreciation of what I have.
Two years in Uganda certainly must have been some change!

Quote:
I didn't really become adventurous at all until my late 40's. I finally realized I wouldn't live forever, so I might as well take chances. It's better than being safe and bored.
I was fifty. And the grandmother of an acquaintance of really brought the lesson home to me.

Her grand-daughter was hemming and hawing about a big opportunity that had come her way, but which seemed like maybe it was too much of a change and too exotic. One day after listening to her grdaughter worrying the topic to death yet again, the exasperated woman said to her: "Just remember, Charlene, you're gonna be dead a long time!"
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,857,680 times
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Great posting and topic to explore.

My personal tips, from things I've researched, wellness experts I've interviewed and personal experience:

-A hobby and/or volunteer work that you feel passionate about

-A mostly vegetarian diet, whole foods, and keeping weight under control

-Practicing yoga or Tai Chi (about yoga, it's been said "you're only as youthful as your spine is flexible")

-Daily laughter with loved ones and friends

-Feeding the mind with new learning and creativity

-Fresh air and outdoor activities

-aerobic, weight-bearing exercise 5 times/week, brisk walking, treadmill

-Making a difference in one's community; leaving a legacy

-If budget and lifestyle permit, a pet, whether a dog, cat, bird or bunny

-Frequent contact with those younger than we; mentoring; Big Brother, Big Sister, etc.

-Posting on City Data (just kidding)
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:04 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 2,985,773 times
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Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Two years in Uganda certainly must have been some change!
It was a huge culture shock but I enjoyed it very much. Lots of inconveniences for a spoiled westerner but overall I'm very glad I went. I had a culture shock by moving from the US to Scotland, but it was nothing compared to going to Uganda!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I was fifty. And the grandmother of an acquaintance of really brought the lesson home to me.

Her grand-daughter was hemming and hawing about a big opportunity that had come her way, but which seemed like maybe it was too much of a change and too exotic. One day after listening to her grdaughter worrying the topic to death yet again, the exasperated woman said to her: "Just remember, Charlene, you're gonna be dead a long time!"
That's the truth!!
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