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Old 11-27-2013, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
5,281 posts, read 6,158,048 times
Reputation: 4370

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So it seems throughout much of history, white supremecy has been a hallmark of American culture. And after slavery, blacks found themselves having to fend for themselves. The lighter skinned ones could possibly con whites into thinking that thinking they too were white, and being black generally sucked. This is because being black generally lead to death in most cases. But in the 1960s, a lot of black artist came out, and they said "black and proud". And in such black people came to terms with being black, and were determined that they would succeed despite being black.

People like my father, grandmother, grand father, and everyone else in my family that came before me never got ahead by denying that they were black. Instead, they were going to succeed to the point their blackness was irrelevant. Black wasn't going to be a handicap for them, and in the end, it never was. They all had varying levels of success, despite either being born into poverty, and being black.

Fast forward to modern day America. It seems like everyone want to be anything other than black. Some people call themselves African American, as if that is somehow more acceptable. Many try to cling to several generations of admixtures to try to say they're mixed. Some try to identify with latin America. But at the end of the day, no one really wants to be black anymore. No one want to admit they are black or say that they are. And I have a bit of an issue with that. It is telling me, that people are defining their self worth by the color of their skin. And I thougt America was moving away from that.

Though to be fair, being America at all is just shameful. i often hear white Americans try to say they are mixed, I guess in an attempt to appear more exotic. Seems to me no one is proud of who they are. So why are black people ashamed of being black, as if being black within itself is some huge advantage. Years ago, in the 80s when I grew up, no one ever said they were mixed. Even if people believed that they were mixed with native American or white, they often just said they were black. It was because there was nothing wrong with being black back then. And people were more determine to seperate their individual values from their skin color. It seems to me, in modern America that people in general are weaker individually, and must get all of their value from ethnic identification.
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Old 11-27-2013, 05:49 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,584 posts, read 25,422,403 times
Reputation: 8971
Seriously? Another one of these threads?
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Old 11-27-2013, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
5,281 posts, read 6,158,048 times
Reputation: 4370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Seriously? Another one of these threads?

Show me another thread that talks specifically about this, and I'll post there.
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Old 11-27-2013, 06:19 PM
 
530 posts, read 1,272,021 times
Reputation: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
Fast forward to modern day America. It seems like everyone want to be anything other than black. Some people call themselves African American, as if that is somehow more acceptable. Many try to cling to several generations of admixtures to try to say they're mixed. Some try to identify with latin America. But at the end of the day, no one really wants to be black anymore. No one want to admit they are black or say that they are. And I have a bit of an issue with that. It is telling me, that people are defining their self worth by the color of their skin. And I thougt America was moving away from that.
That is SO ridiculous. Even though Black America does disproportionately face a lot of issues, I feel like a lot of black ppl try to dig for more issues to complain about even when they're minor at best..

I have never met or even heard of a black person not admitting that they are black. It's either you've been watching too much Tyra Banks reruns or your mistaking us for Dominicans.. [no shade]

I've NEVER heard of any black person who wasn't an afro-latino try to associate themselves with Latin America.

Many blacks are distantly admixed but nobody claims themselves as mixed-race as a result of that. The only rare exceptions that I can think of is unless that admixture is fairly recent and bares an extremely strong influence on their appearance.

I have seen SO MANY black americans openly:
- Calling themselves Brothaz and Sistaz
- Taking part in the NEW rampant natural hair movement aka "goin natural" where blacks wear their hair in their natural state
- Mentioning their BBC's (go on urbandictionary to find out what that means lol)
- Some wearing 'Black is Beautiful' shirts
- Still giving their children so-called "black names"
- Joining Black Student Unions
- Attending HBCU's (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)

^^ People with strong black identities generally wouldn't do the above..

Last edited by PrestigiousReputability; 11-27-2013 at 06:31 PM..
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Old 11-27-2013, 06:43 PM
 
2,241 posts, read 3,074,156 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrestigiousReputability View Post
That is SO ridiculous. Even though Black America does disproportionately face a lot of issues, I feel like a lot of black ppl try to dig for more issues to complain about even when they're minor at best..

I have never met or even heard of a black person not admitting that they are black. It's either you've been watching too much Tyra Banks reruns or your mistaking us for Dominicans.. [no shade]

I've NEVER heard of any black person who wasn't an afro-latino try to associate themselves with Latin America.

Many blacks are distantly admixed but nobody claims themselves as mixed-race as a result of that. The only rare exceptions that I can think of is unless that admixture is fairly recent and bares an extremely strong influence on their appearance.

I have seen SO MANY black americans openly:
- Calling themselves Brothaz and Sistaz
- Taking part in the NEW rampant natural hair movement aka "goin natural" where blacks wear their hair in their natural state
- Mentioning their BBC's (go on urbandictionary to find out what that means lol)
- Some wearing 'Black is Beautiful' shirts
- Still giving their children so-called "black names"
- Joining Black Student Unions
- Attending HBCU's (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)

^^ People with strong black identities generally wouldn't do the above..
Rofl! The funny thing is that many so called stereotypical black names are actually just Muslim, Islamic, Arabic, Arab, and Irish names.

Tyrone is an Irish name. Latifah is an Arabic name. Aaliyah is an Arabic name.

Jerome is an Irish name as well (if I'm not mistaken). A lot of these names are from various other cultures lol.
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Old 11-27-2013, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
5,281 posts, read 6,158,048 times
Reputation: 4370
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrestigiousReputability View Post
That is SO ridiculous. Even though Black America does disproportionately face a lot of issues, I feel like a lot of black ppl try to dig for more issues to complain about even when they're minor at best..

I have never met or even heard of a black person not admitting that they are black. It's either you've been watching too much Tyra Banks reruns or your mistaking us for Dominicans.. [no shade]

I've NEVER heard of any black person who wasn't an afro-latino try to associate themselves with Latin America.

Many blacks are distantly admixed but nobody claims themselves as mixed-race as a result of that. The only rare exceptions that I can think of is unless that admixture is fairly recent and bares an extremely strong influence on their appearance.

I have seen SO MANY black americans openly:
- Calling themselves Brothaz and Sistaz
- Taking part in the NEW rampant natural hair movement aka "goin natural" where blacks wear their hair in their natural state
- Mentioning their BBC's (go on urbandictionary to find out what that means lol)
- Some wearing 'Black is Beautiful' shirts
- Still giving their children so-called "black names"
- Joining Black Student Unions
- Attending HBCU's (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)

^^ People with strong black identities generally wouldn't do the above..

Move to the West Coast or a place like Atlanta. You'll see what I'm talking about. Hell I've seen it to an extent in NYC when I was out there
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Old 11-27-2013, 07:02 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,584 posts, read 25,422,403 times
Reputation: 8971
Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
Show me another thread that talks specifically about this, and I'll post there.
I gave you too much credit for being smart. What I mean is, yet another race related thread and yet again, another one about Black Americans. Since you would like to have the discussion and it looks like it's going to happen, let me ask you:

How does what someone else calls themselves impact your life? Why do you care if someone wants to say that they're mixed? Now, I have agreed with you on certain things so I know that you can explain things well. So when I ask how it impacts your life, I am being dead serious. Is it also impacting my life and I've not realized it? I called myself Black American specifically but also acknowledge that I am mixed with a lot of other genes. I am not light skinned. I have a medium darkish complexion with a distinct red tone. many people ask if I have Asian in me because of my eyes. This is before they ever know that my great great grandfather was Filipino. They also tell me that my facial features don't look completely African. Nonetheless, I call myself what I do as a personal choice just as others prefer the term African American rather than Black American. I simply fail to see why this matters.
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Old 11-27-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 13,425,029 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelismaticEchoes View Post
Rofl! The funny thing is that many so called stereotypical black names are actually just Muslim, Islamic, Arabic, Arab, and Irish names.

Tyrone is an Irish name. Latifah is an Arabic name. Aaliyah is an Arabic name.

Jerome is an Irish name as well (if I'm not mistaken). A lot of these names are from various other cultures lol.
Neither of these seem to be as commonly given as they were in the past, though. Nowadays, when people speak of "black names", they're speaking of names that are completely original and can't really be traced to any other culture except that of Black Americans.

I can't remember the last time I met a black person born after the 80s with a Muslim name.
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Old 11-27-2013, 07:45 PM
 
2,241 posts, read 3,074,156 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Neither of these seem to be as commonly given as they were in the past, though. Nowadays, when people speak of "black names", they're speaking of names that are completely original and can't really be traced to any other culture except that of Black Americans.

I can't remember the last time I met a black person born after the 80s with a Muslim name.
But that's the thing. Many of the names associated with black categorized individuals in the USA tend to be names that are from other groups. Like I said, Tyrone which is stereotypically associated with as being a "black name" is actually an Irish name. Certain last names are often associated with African Americans as well. Ppl often don't know the origins of names lots of times.

For example, most African Americans do not know what Kwanzaa is or even celebrate it. Swahilli, is a language that is based on and derived from Arabic and other influences yet it was pushed by some self proclaimed ethnocentric bias Afrocentric Nubian Olmec crackhead supporters type individuals, and some ppl in the black communities took it and ran with it and it helped inspire certain attachment to names and outsiders interpreted it as being "authentic or stereotypical black culture etc".

This is what happens when ideas and cultures are transmitted and when certain groups culturally (RE)appropriate things. Ppl forget about their origins and also the context and overlook such things.
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Old 11-27-2013, 08:03 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 13,425,029 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelismaticEchoes View Post
But that's the thing. Many of the names associated with black categorized individuals in the USA tend to be names that are from other groups. Like I said, Tyrone which is stereotypically associated with as being a "black name" is actually an Irish name. Certain last names are often associated with African Americans as well. Ppl often don't know the origins of names lots of times.

For example, most African Americans do not know what Kwanzaa is or even celebrate it. Swahilli, is a language that is based on and derived from Arabic and other influences yet it was pushed by some self proclaimed ethnocentric bias Afrocentric Nubian Olmec crackhead supporters type individuals, and some ppl in the black communities took it and ran with it and it helped inspire certain attachment to names and outsiders interpreted it as being "authentic or stereotypical black culture etc".

This is what happens when ideas and cultures are transmitted and when certain groups culturally (RE)appropriate things. Ppl forget about their origins and also the context and overlook such things.
I understood what you were saying. My point is that those names don't seem as common today as the totally made up names.
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