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Old 12-04-2009, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Sugar Grove, IL
3,131 posts, read 11,644,298 times
Reputation: 1640

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just started john grisham's newest!
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Old 12-04-2009, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Maine
461 posts, read 796,491 times
Reputation: 793
Taking time off from the library to read some of my own that have been neglected. The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen didn't expect to like it, but I loved it. Mary Modern by Camille deAngelis - really, really interesting about a woman that clones her grandmother. Just different. And last, His Brother's Keeper by Jonathan Weiner - a memoir about ALS, the writer's brother had it, really really sad.
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Old 12-04-2009, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Just west of the Missouri River
837 posts, read 1,709,827 times
Reputation: 1470
I liked the Corrections a lot, too. Now I'm reading Julia Glass's "I See You Everywhere". I'm liking it a lot. She also wrote "The Three Junes", which was very good.
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Old 12-04-2009, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,315,804 times
Reputation: 62766
I had never read "Alas, Babylon" and after reading "The Road" I decided to read it. It was published in 1959 and I was only 11 years old at that time. So, I really identify with the two military kids in the book.

I was raised on Air Force Bases and my father was in SAC (Strategic Air Command), so much of the early part of the book really hits home with me. He also flew B-47s and B-52s.

It is a very, very good book. I can't believe I never read it before. It is quite frightening and tells what would have most likely happened if the Soviets bombed us before we bombed them. Talk about the destruction of society.....scary stuff. It's amazing to think about what became important and what became useless to survivors.

It's a very quick read and I could not put it down. I just love to get hold of a book that I stay up all night to read because it is so good.
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Old 12-04-2009, 02:53 PM
 
3,943 posts, read 6,371,712 times
Reputation: 4233
Ketabcha, I think I have Alas Bablyon, but haven't read it. I'll have to look and make sure. I'm still reading Under The Dome, and Beasts, by Joyce Carol Oates.

I started The Corrections, but, thought it was so dry. It couldn't hold my interest, but, I'm thinking, since you guys really liked it, maybe I'll give it more of a chance. I just thought that family was so boring! Are they not?
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Old 12-04-2009, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Not tied down... maybe later! *rawr*
2,689 posts, read 6,932,418 times
Reputation: 4341
"The Gun Seller" is a goooood read! You can definitely tell that Hugh Laurie writes for House, as the book reads like House was in it. Hope he writes another.

I'm now reading "Killers: The Most Barbaric Murders Of Our Times", by Nigel Cawthorne.

It could go into more depth, but it's an easy read. Kinda interesting.
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Old 12-05-2009, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,936,034 times
Reputation: 36644
Thomas Mullen's "The Last Town on Earth". Not very brilliant writing, by a boring and humorless author. But a book most of you would probably like, about a logging town at the time of WWI, labor strikes, and a flu epidemic.

I just abandoned Nathan Englander's "The Ministry of Special Cases" after about 50 pages, which was unable to hold my interest in any respect.
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Old 12-05-2009, 07:36 AM
 
Location: North Central Illinois
7,364 posts, read 5,478,782 times
Reputation: 43434
Right now I am reading Philippa Gregory's 'The White Queen'.
But before that I read Stieg Larsson's 'The Girl Who Played With Fire'. This is his second book in a series of three books. So now I am waiting for the first book to come back to my local library "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo'. And then I will have to read the third one after that. I really loved 'fire' so I can't wait to read his other two books.
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Old 12-05-2009, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,515 posts, read 84,705,921 times
Reputation: 114974
Just finished Kabul Beauty School.

It made me thankful I was not born in Afghanistan. Years ago I read Ken Follett's Lie Down with Lions, which is about Afghanistan. I remember thinking that I would never in a million years want to visit that country. Kabul Beauty School confirmed that.
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Old 12-05-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,315,804 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Just finished Kabul Beauty School.

It made me thankful I was not born in Afghanistan. Years ago I read Ken Follett's Lie Down with Lions, which is about Afghanistan. I remember thinking that I would never in a million years want to visit that country. Kabul Beauty School confirmed that.
There is also a video/documentary about the Kabul Beauty School. It's quite good.

I have Follett's "Lie Down with Lions." I've read it twice. I have more than one book about Ahmed Shah Massoud.

There is an older book titled "Caravans" by James Michener that is good and it, too, is about Afghanistan. One of my personal favorites is "A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush" by Eric Newby which is a true story and it is informative and absolutely hysterical. It was written in 1958. Newby and a friend (both British) decided to walk across Afghanistan to go mountain climbing in the Hindu Kush (mountain range). They prepare by climbing a hill in Wales. OMG! The Hindu Kush is unbelievably high. A hill in Wales ain't gonna' cut it. The characters they meet along the way are such interesting fellows. The culture is explained and it's a great trip of a book.

However, my personal favorite is "An Unexpected Light" by Jason Elliot. It is perhaps the lovliest book I have ever read. It's pure joy to read and it is also a true story. I cry when I read this book.....not out of sadness but out of the total delight in reading such a masterpiece. I found it in the travel section of a book store in December 2001. I do not consider it to be a travel book. In my mind it is a book about the love one man has for a country that is far from his home. It's exciting, heart-breaking and gorgeous.
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