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Old 05-20-2009, 09:11 PM
 
126 posts, read 383,644 times
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To add to Grainraiser's question, I also wonder how many of you folks that live up there came from similar communities in other cities? I honestly have no idea, but I wonder if most of you think of these master planned communities as typical neighborhoods. There seems to be a huge difference in how people feel about them. I'm from the midwest and have lived on both coasts, and these sparkly communities have always been a bit odd to me. Kind of like deciding to live in a carefully planned residential resort instead of a community. But that's just me.

I'm with lh_newbie...I just feel more comfortable in older, more established areas. It just seems that people here love for everything to be NEW.
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:26 PM
 
4,305 posts, read 11,133,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by $DFW8$ View Post
Most are transplants...which I think is cool because you get to know people from a lot of different cities and walks of life. But there are some that grew up in the DFW area and still live here. In our neighborhood alone, we have people from almost every state and several from other countries.

Just because somebody is a transplant does not make them any different than anybody else or a native of a particular area. You people who bash transplants on here need to realize that if you were to move to another city, you would be considered a transplant as well.

I'm curious as to how many years you have to live in an area to not be considered a transplant anymore? I have lived in DFW for almost 8 years now and I know the area very well. Although I fit the description of a typical transplant(executive relocated from NYC), I don't really consider myself new to the area anymore. But I know that doesn't compare to you people that have lived here all your lives.

I'm not bashing transplants at all and I hope you did not take my post in that way. The reason I ask is because many of us natives see Frisco in a whole different light than many transplants. I have lived in Dallas for 40 years and I have never meet anyone who was born and raised in Frisco. It was just a real small rural community that was barely a blip on the map. Twenty years ago if you would have asked most of the natives to point out Frisco on a map they would not have been able to do it. In fact as a boy my dad use to take us rabbit hunting in McKinney. My dad was also a huge Dallas Cowboy fan and we would go to McKinney to see the Cowboys play on TV when they were blacked out locally. I simply ask the question because my view of Frisco includes the old Frisco while others have only seem what it has become. Heck I should have bought land in Frisco back in the 80's and 90's when it was dirt cheap. I can also say the same thing about Rockwall. Not very long ago there were no homes on the lake and no one had a reason to go to Rockwall.
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:50 PM
 
Location: la hacienda
2,259 posts, read 8,635,649 times
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I live in Dallas and 3 of the 6 immediate and across the street neighbors are transplants, including myself. I don't find it an issue in real life, why is it such an issue on this board? Don't we all have pretty much want to live our lives in the best way we can no matter where we were born?
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,913 posts, read 9,600,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grainraiser View Post
I'm not bashing transplants at all and I hope you did not take my post in that way. The reason I ask is because many of us natives see Frisco in a whole different light than many transplants. I have lived in Dallas for 40 years and I have never meet anyone who was born and raised in Frisco. It was just a real small rural community that was barely a blip on the map. Twenty years ago if you would have asked most of the natives to point out Frisco on a map they would not have been able to do it. In fact as a boy my dad use to take us rabbit hunting in McKinney. My dad was also a huge Dallas Cowboy fan and we would go to McKinney to see the Cowboys play on TV when they were blacked out locally. I simply ask the question because my view of Frisco includes the old Frisco while others have only seem what it has become. Heck I should have bought land in Frisco back in the 80's and 90's when it was dirt cheap. I can also say the same thing about Rockwall. Not very long ago there were no homes on the lake and no one had a reason to go to Rockwall.
I live in McKinney, work in Frisco and go to church in Prosper. Between work and church, I can think of 8 different families that are Frisco natives (as in went to Frisco high school back when they were just Coons and not Racoons). One of my buddies says the growth is weird in that all the schools popping up are named for teachers, principals and coaches he had growing up.

Of course a town that goes from about 7,000 in 1990 to over 100,000 is going to have transplants. The growth of the region is bringing in jobs, making the economy diversified and able to weather downturns like we're experincing now and has in turn made life better for all in the metroplex. That is why I don't understand the suburban bashing.
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Old 05-20-2009, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
6,913 posts, read 9,600,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSPMom View Post
To add to Grainraiser's question, I also wonder how many of you folks that live up there came from similar communities in other cities? I honestly have no idea, but I wonder if most of you think of these master planned communities as typical neighborhoods. There seems to be a huge difference in how people feel about them. I'm from the midwest and have lived on both coasts, and these sparkly communities have always been a bit odd to me. Kind of like deciding to live in a carefully planned residential resort instead of a community. But that's just me.

I'm with lh_newbie...I just feel more comfortable in older, more established areas. It just seems that people here love for everything to be NEW.
Where is this notion coming from that Frisco is a Master Planned Community? It was a small railroad and farming town over 100 years old, then the mall came on its southern border, then different subdivisions started popping up all around. The big job centers in far NW Plano are very close to Frisco, would think that had as much to do with Frisco's growth as anything (EDS, JC Penney, Countrywide, Dr Pepper, etc).

The biggest Master planned community I know of in this part of DFW would be Stonebridge Ranch in McKinney. It is what set the tone for McKinney's growth, but still McKinney is a very diversified community, has a beautiful historic district and old courthouse square.

Some people love new, some loved established. Again, I ask, why bash things that are different from what you have or where you live? And I don't call it master planned because it is new. I mean, what is that different about it? A golf course? Those are all over the metroplex. A pool? Again, all over the area. Nice ameinities like parks connected by trails and well planned out streets? I guess that is the hallmark of a planned community. Why is this seen as sterile? The landscaping of Stonebridge Ranch is the main thing that makes it stand out from being cookie cutter -- which of course is one of the main bashes I see here against the suburbs.

Oh well, don't know if this is therapeutic as 4th gen dallas said it would be for me, more an exercise in futility. Well this is how I spent much of my off day, won't be around to defend Collin County much more 8^{D}
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:59 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,618 posts, read 31,190,734 times
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Originally Posted by theloneranger View Post
I wish this were the case in Preston Hollow. The house I spent my first 5 years in Dallas in is has been combined with 2 other lots for a McMansion. Kinda sad...
I know how you feel, my childhood home was torn down years ago to make way for a McMansion. It was near Glendora and Tibbs.
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Old 05-21-2009, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Centennial, CO
156 posts, read 605,882 times
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Frisco a destination city? Hmmmm....we lived there for two years, and didn't see it that way at all. Maybe if that rumored Disney park is ever built there.... We couldn't stand it after two years, and moved to Denver. We found Frisco to be very "blah" and unfriendly. But, that's just MHO.
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Old 05-21-2009, 01:01 PM
 
16,092 posts, read 35,802,339 times
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Lemmus lemmus migrating north to the tundra
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Old 05-21-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
10,171 posts, read 16,743,649 times
Reputation: 24779
I can't imagine somebody from several states away planning their vacation - being able to go anywhere at all - and picking Frisco, TX.

That doesn't mean there aren't fun things to do there or entertainment, but I find it strains credulity to call it a "Destination City."
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:58 PM
 
6,585 posts, read 22,397,483 times
Reputation: 3170
Doesn't Frisco have a convention center? Isn't Frisco getting conventions?
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