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Old 12-02-2017, 04:03 PM
 
613 posts, read 508,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Why can't you walk in Charlotte? Everything is near Tryon Street, it is very compact.

I can walk in downtown Atlanta with no problem.
The only place that's walkable in Charlotte is the center city inside 277. About 2% of Charlotte's population lives in that area...
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Old 12-02-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,592 posts, read 4,014,719 times
Reputation: 2931
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
The only place that's walkable in Charlotte is the center city inside 277. About 2% of Charlotte's population lives in that area...
So most people in northern cities live within walking distance of the CBD?

I didn't know 'walkability' was related to living downtown. Generally there are a lot of people from the suburbs that go downtown after work during week and on weekends. I don't see any issue with walking in downtown Charlotte.
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Old 12-02-2017, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,914 posts, read 6,549,966 times
Reputation: 5392
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I’ve noticed this. It really is unfortunate. You gotta leave the US to get warm and walkable. Barcelona is a good one. Mexico City I imagine would be too. The closest thing we have is San Francisco. I wouldn’t call that a warm climate though, but I also wouldn’t call it a cold climate either.
Famous (albeit unsubstantiated) quote from Mark Twain: "The coldest winter I ever saw was the summer I spent in San Francisco."
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Old 12-02-2017, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,885,687 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Where to start...

Houston

Phoenix

San Antonio

Dallas

Jacksonville

Orlando

Atlanta

Charlotte

Memphis

Tampa


I can't name a single one that is truly walkable like NY, SF, Boston or Philly.

Maybe Baltimore?
I live in Phoenix, and my section of the city (Downtown) is very walkable and improving more every year
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Old 12-02-2017, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,592 posts, read 4,014,719 times
Reputation: 2931
In Charlotte, the NFL stadium, NBA arena, and minor leage baseball stadium are all in the CBD.

In NYC, the NFL stadium is in NJ, the baseball team is in Brooklyn, and it looks like Madison Square Garden is a good hike from Times Square.
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Old 12-02-2017, 06:07 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,284,222 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Because air conditioning didn't used to be a thing, and mass car ownership wasn't a thing. So at that time, people needed to live in places where it didn't get hot in the summer, and with the exception of San Francisco, the west was still a frontier.
Tell that to New Orleans, Charleston, Savannah, Galveston, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Where to start...

Houston

Phoenix

San Antonio

Dallas

Jacksonville

Orlando

Atlanta

Charlotte

Memphis

Tampa
All of these cities have walkable areas at least in their downtowns.
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Old 12-02-2017, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Poughkeepsie, New York
86 posts, read 65,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
In Charlotte, the NFL stadium, NBA arena, and minor leage baseball stadium are all in the CBD.

In NYC, the NFL stadium is in NJ, the baseball team is in Brooklyn, and it looks like Madison Square Garden is a good hike from Times Square.
You mean Queens and The Bronx, right? Brooklyn hasn't had an MLB team for 60 years.

Also, the subway exists. You should try it sometime.
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Old 12-02-2017, 06:11 PM
 
1,313 posts, read 1,206,708 times
Reputation: 3103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
So most people in northern cities live within walking distance of the CBD?

I didn't know 'walkability' was related to living downtown. Generally there are a lot of people from the suburbs that go downtown after work during week and on weekends. I don't see any issue with walking in downtown Charlotte.
Most northern cities have multiple walkable areas where people live, not just CBDs that people commute to.
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Old 12-02-2017, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,592 posts, read 4,014,719 times
Reputation: 2931
There are people living in downtown Charlotte and other southern downtowns.

But I don't think walkability has anything to do with where people live, or mass transit.
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Old 12-02-2017, 06:16 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,814 posts, read 1,309,711 times
Reputation: 3211
The South has some old, walk-able cities. Savannah, Charleston and NOLA are all very walkable and honestly maybe more pleasant to walk in that a place like NYC or Chicago.

None of them achieved the size of a NYC, or Chicago due to the historic economic differences between the industrial North and more rural South. The result of the civil war and reconstruction also played a major factor.

Don't forget that the North East is much closer to Europe which was an advantage early on which gave NYC and Boston a jump start.

I think economics played the biggest roll in what cities developed between the 1880s and 1950s.

Look at a map of rail roads before and directly after the civil war during the industrial revolution and notice they are mostly in the north. The Transcontinental Railroad went through the north.

I think AC played a smaller part since Baltimore,DC, Richmond, Savannah, Charleston and NOLA all get hot in the summer but were major cities around that time.

NOLA has been a large city for a long time, but it dropped out of the top 10 in the 1880s. Charleston made it's last top 10 appearance in the 1840s when there was still less than 30K people living there.
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