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Old 12-26-2008, 05:28 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,830,394 times
Reputation: 3545

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
I beg your pardon? Chicagoland was in the top 10 fastest growing metros in the nation this year. And places like NYC continue to grow, but you dont notice it as much because the population is already gigantic. 50K people could move into NYC and the % change would be miniscule. But put those 50K people in, say, Nevada, and the % change is much more drastic. Capeesh?

You know, Chicagoland and NYC both have a negative domestic migration. The only reason why both of them grow is because of deaths + births, and international migration.
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Old 12-26-2008, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,993,100 times
Reputation: 1667
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylehny View Post
LOL. Thank you for just confirming what I've been saying, genius.

Per the articles you've posted;
And I must add that labor force workers are middle class (at best)

Young couples are usually broke.

This is what I've been saying all along. When have I ever argued against the facts that the middle-classes are moving out of the good areas into cheap areas? Didn't I say that lower-to-middle class people are fleeing California, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey because of housing costs? Please carefully read the sources you wish to display before wasting my time.

People who actually pay 95% of the taxes in CA, NY, NY and CT AREN'T the ones fleeing. It's the lower classes who can't afford to live in those spectacular areas and are forced to move to bland, crappy, southern states. The high-paid professionals choose to live in good areas like NY, CA, NJ and CT.

If you weren't aware, people don't move to bland rubbish towns like Phoenix because they're fabulous places. They move to those places because they're cheap. I'll say it again: the non-tax-paying lower-middle class make up the vast majority of the people who migrate to cheaper areas.
No, your statements above are "not" true. Particularly the one I've bolded. My point is that the people who are moving represent "all" segments of those areas populations. And that there are many middle and upper middle income folks who are moving from those places. You simply quoted that these people "could not afford" to live in the areas they live in. Nowhere did any of those articles say these were uneducated, poor folks. Its just the opposite, the people moving are mostly people who have the "skills and education" to leave. Have you ever heard of the term "brain drain"?? Just Google it and you'll see exactly what I'm talking about.

Here's an article about "who's leaving NY"...

"...the average annual income of households that left the city in 2005 was $72,443, according to a report from City Comptroller William Thompson Jr. analyzing the Census numbers; the income of the households that stayed averaged $66,509..."

...The likeliest households to exit New York were those earning between $40,000 and $60,000 annually—this represents the solidly middle-class in a city where the median household income is $40,000, according to a New York University study using data from 2005. Though these made up only 17 percent of non-elderly households in 2005, they accounted for 22 percent of those households that left.

Interestingly, the next likeliest income bracket to flee the city was households making $140,000 to $249,000—suggesting that perhaps it’s not just income but what you get for that income that’s dictating the exodus.

Those households earning less than $40,000 annually, and those earning much more (over $250,000), were the likeliest to stay...


full article: http://www.observer.com/2007/census-...ight-new-york/

Last edited by Carolina Blue; 12-26-2008 at 06:01 PM..
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Old 12-26-2008, 06:56 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,265,202 times
Reputation: 2781
Quote:
Originally Posted by kylehny View Post
LOL. Thank you for just confirming what I've been saying, genius.

Per the articles you've posted;
And I must add that labor force workers are middle class (at best)

Young couples are usually broke.

This is what I've been saying all along. When have I ever argued against the facts that the middle-classes are moving out of the good areas into cheap areas? Didn't I say that lower-to-middle class people are fleeing California, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey because of housing costs? Please carefully read the sources you wish to display before wasting my time.

People who actually pay 95% of the taxes in CA, NY, NY and CT AREN'T the ones fleeing. It's the lower classes who can't afford to live in those spectacular areas and are forced to move to bland, crappy, southern states. The high-paid professionals choose to live in good areas like NY, CA, NJ and CT.

If you weren't aware, people don't move to bland rubbish towns like Phoenix because they're fabulous places. They move to those places because they're cheap. I'll say it again: the non-tax-paying lower-middle class make up the vast majority of the people who migrate to cheaper areas.
Ignorance...pure ignorance. Your condescending words are not welcome at all, and simply not true. You use derogatory words about places outside of your little world like "cheap" "bland" "crappy"...and you make yourself look very ignorant to the outside world.

Where is your data showing that the majority of people migrating south are lower middle class? Just because you think that's the case doesn't make it actually true. You're wrong...

Oh that's right...they can't relocated to Connecticut because of the "controled growth" and "planning" in your crappy, bland, cheap state. Nobody wants to move there...and the migration of people from all income levels will continue for a loooooong time.
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Old 12-26-2008, 06:58 PM
 
7,848 posts, read 18,265,202 times
Reputation: 2781
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carolina Blue View Post
No, your statements above are "not" true. Particularly the one I've bolded. My point is that the people who are moving represent "all" segments of those areas populations. And that there are many middle and upper middle income folks who are moving from those places. You simply quoted that these people "could not afford" to live in the areas they live in. Nowhere did any of those articles say these were uneducated, poor folks. Its just the opposite, the people moving are mostly people who have the "skills and education" to leave. Have you ever heard of the term "brain drain"?? Just Google it and you'll see exactly what I'm talking about.

Here's an article about "who's leaving NY"...

"...the average annual income of households that left the city in 2005 was $72,443, according to a report from City Comptroller William Thompson Jr. analyzing the Census numbers; the income of the households that stayed averaged $66,509..."

...The likeliest households to exit New York were those earning between $40,000 and $60,000 annually—this represents the solidly middle-class in a city where the median household income is $40,000, according to a New York University study using data from 2005. Though these made up only 17 percent of non-elderly households in 2005, they accounted for 22 percent of those households that left.

Interestingly, the next likeliest income bracket to flee the city was households making $140,000 to $249,000—suggesting that perhaps it’s not just income but what you get for that income that’s dictating the exodus.

Those households earning less than $40,000 annually, and those earning much more (over $250,000), were the likeliest to stay...

full article: Census Shows Middle Class in Flight From New York | The New York Observer
It's really no use with that one...hard head, small brain. Total misconceptions about everywhere outside his/her little world, and nothing is as good as his/her little world. I'm moving on and blocking the idiot.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:42 PM
 
132 posts, read 294,782 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Ignorance...pure ignorance. Your condescending words are not welcome at all, and simply not true. You use derogatory words about places outside of your little world like "cheap" "bland" "crappy"...and you make yourself look very ignorant to the outside world.

Where is your data showing that the majority of people migrating south are lower middle class? Just because you think that's the case doesn't make it actually true. You're wrong...

Oh that's right...they can't relocated to Connecticut because of the "controled growth" and "planning" in your crappy, bland, cheap state. Nobody wants to move there...and the migration of people from all income levels will continue for a loooooong time.
I hate to join this childish ''my state is better than your state'' discussion but I have a few things to say.

We just moved from the south to Connecticut because of my husbands job. As native southerners, the first thing we noticed here were the large, old colonial homes on a few acres of property each. The new developments with large homes are the same way. It's quite nice that the towns and cities here take pride enough to keep out chains, keep the woodsy feel and spread people out a bit. The suburbs have committees specializing in this regulation. And this state is the third most dense in the country!

I don't agree with everything kidyankee says but in this case, kid is right.

And Connecticut is not crappy. The first thing I thought when I came here for the first time was that I felt like we were in a storybook!

The people here need to get over themselves. And their states.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:51 PM
 
1,219 posts, read 3,825,974 times
Reputation: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by aroundthecorner059 View Post
I hate to join this childish ''my state is better than your state'' discussion but I have a few things to say.

We just moved from the south to Connecticut because of my husbands job. As native southerners, the first thing we noticed here were the large, old colonial homes on a few acres of property each. The new developments with large homes are the same way. It's quite nice that the towns and cities here take pride enough to keep out chains, keep the woodsy feel and spread people out a bit. The suburbs have committees specializing in this regulation. And this state is the third most dense in the country!

I don't agree with everything kidyankee says but in this case, kid is right.

And Connecticut is not crappy. The first thing I thought when I came here for the first time was that I felt like we were in a storybook!

The people here need to get over themselves. And their states.
Um, have you ever been to Hartford, Bridgeport or New Haven??? Or for that matter, Waterbury, New Britain, Meriden...I live in CT and my world looks nothing like the rich folks' country place. Who can afford a 'few acres' here??? What are the property taxes, like 12 grand a year? And there are certainly chain stores here-I just came in from shopping at Walmart and dinner at Chilis!!!
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:06 PM
 
132 posts, read 294,782 times
Reputation: 97
You just mentioned 6 of the 10 worst towns in the state. They are all urban cities with mostly poor minorities. Congratulations, as you have successfully manipulated my post.

About 95 percent of the towns in Connecticut are the way I described. Being able to afford it is irrelevant to the discussion.
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:23 PM
 
Location: ITL (Houston)
9,223 posts, read 13,830,394 times
Reputation: 3545
About 95% of the towns in CT are like that? Please...
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 10,720,075 times
Reputation: 794
New York State is falling hard right now. Young people fleeing the state is true... This is what happened before NYC went down in the 70s... So I'm told.

But I'd rather New York reality come back while the population tanks than the population rise and yuppies take over every neighborhood. Harlem is already starting to make the yuppies think twice...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1pZl3u6Ee0
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Old 12-26-2008, 08:29 PM
 
132 posts, read 294,782 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel713 View Post
About 95% of the towns in CT are like that? Please...
Yes, Angel, most towns in CT do have that rural, country feel. Visit sometime before you show such ignorance.

Now that I have stooped to the level of most on this thread, I'll call it a night. G'night, y'all!
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