U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-28-2011, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
38,467 posts, read 18,230,112 times
Reputation: 46325

Advertisements

I was doing a little google research on the risks of tanning beds; since Sen. Snowe has introduced legislation to repeal the tax on them to promote business interests. It turns out that Maine already is way above the national average in melanoma incidence.....it seems to be similar to tobacco a known carcinogen.

"New Cases of Melanoma.
The rate of new melanoma diagnoses—responsible for 75% of all skin cancer deaths—was 25% higher in Maine than the national average from 2001-2005 and was the 10 highest in the U.S. An estimated 410 state residents were diagnosed with melanoma in 2008. http://www.epa.gov/sunwise/doc/me_facts_print.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-14-2011, 12:09 PM
 
6 posts, read 8,636 times
Reputation: 15
I'm surprised no one mentioned the paper industry....really nasty polluters
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2011, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,759 posts, read 47,624,761 times
Reputation: 17641
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillSPrestonEsquire View Post
I'm surprised no one mentioned the paper industry....really nasty polluters
Are the pollutants of the paper industry specifically linked to the specific cancers that are seen in Maine?

Or is it off-topic?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2011, 12:36 PM
 
6 posts, read 8,636 times
Reputation: 15
I don't know, it was just a guess. There isn't really any other major polluter in the state that I can think of off the top of my head
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2011, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth
63 posts, read 115,425 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
I think you're right about that. Having a higher ratio of older folks could skew the numbers.

Breast and uterine cancer in women, and prostate cancer in men generally tend to be discovered later in life, and the rate increases with age. 1 in 4 women develop uterine cancer, typically discovered about the time of menopause.

I just compiled graphs for ages under 50, and 50+, based on stats for all cancers from 1992 to 2008.

The under 50 age group shows incident rates of about 92-97 per 100,000 people, while the 50+ age group shows incident rates of about 1400-1500 per 100,000.

Fast Stats

This is what I was thinking...I know I have read in many other threads that the population of younger folks is low from many moving out of state. Plus, it seems Maine is a "retirement" state, so many are moving in from other states. It seems to me if numbers were crunched with consideration to this data; the stats would most likely even out to a norm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
13,114 posts, read 7,243,047 times
Reputation: 50152
My DH read an article about cancer clusters that are mainly in towns bordering along Maine and other states. It was suggested that it may be in relation to the lack of variety in the gene pool. When animals are bred for specific traits it can introduce a variety of illness, I guess we humans are not much different. Yet another reason Mainers should welcome more young people from away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2011, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,501 posts, read 6,451,827 times
Reputation: 9444
Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
My DH read an article about cancer clusters that are mainly in towns bordering along Maine and other states. It was suggested that it may be in relation to the lack of variety in the gene pool. When animals are bred for specific traits it can introduce a variety of illness, I guess we humans are not much different. Yet another reason Mainers should welcome more young people from away.
May be some truth to that. Mouse breeders who supply researchers must be always on guard against undesirable evolution and mutation of the lines.

'Normal' cells respond to external growth and death signals. The cells have receptors that respond to chemical signals to grow and replicate, as well as receptors that respond to chemical signals that tell them it is time to die ('programmed cell death' AKA apoptosis).

'Cancer' cells are cells which have evolved the ability to manufacture the chemicals that signal growth and replication on their own, and to favor receptors for those chemicals in preference to the receptors for apoptosis. In other words, they have eliminated the 'shut-off switch' that is present in 'normal' cells, and cease to respond to the external signal to die. They become autonomous, creating their own signals to grow and replicate with no 'off' switch. This is, ultimately, an evolution which is *not* beneficial to their survival, as they consume more and more of the body's resources in their mad rush to grow and replicate, until the host dies because the cancer cells are consuming the bulk of the resources.

I think that this is one of the reasons that uterine cancer in women is so prevalent- the lining of the uterus is shed and re-grown on a fairly frequent basis, which presents many more opportunities for this mal-evolution to occur.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2011, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Bar Harbor, ME
1,922 posts, read 3,673,603 times
Reputation: 1287
Always look at at what the statistics really mean. What kinds of cancers are higher? People use statistics to cover a variety of things.

Where is the cancer rate higher? Why is the cancer rate higher? ETC. Don't just naturally assume that its some horrible environment factor when it may be something else altogether. Also look at the source of the statistics. People use statistics to serve some purpose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2011, 01:52 PM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,273,393 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
People use statistics to serve some purpose.

Yes, and in the case of cancer statistics, usually to delude themselves into thinking that they can live forever in some magical place completely unscathed by any disease.

Good luck with that I say.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-20-2011, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Central Maine
1,472 posts, read 2,618,132 times
Reputation: 1276
I've always thought that there were three causes for the high cancer rates in Maine (other than smoking and drinking... which we do a lot of):
1) Most of our rivers are/ or were used as sewers for towns and industry. Many of us get our drinking water from these rivers.
2) Agricultural chemical use that has worked its way into almost every well in the state (to some level).
3) Coal fired electricity generators in the Midwest that have be dumping crap on us for decades. This stuff kills our trees and fish, and can't be helping us any.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top