U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Teaching
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-21-2010, 12:40 PM
 
29,464 posts, read 33,728,825 times
Reputation: 11093

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
You see, that's the problem. If higher pay meant better teachers, then I'm all for that. But it just isn't the case in the real world.

Like I said above, people in all professions should be paid according to their performance. Not an artificial pay scale, not according to what some union negotiated, not according to tenure. Performance, period.

I'm sure there are plenty of teachers who are mediocre or even bad in the high-pay school districts, making well over 50 grand, while there are excellent teachers who work their butts off and whose students excel, and they are making peanuts. They can apply to get into those higher paying districts, but there aren't openings. They are filled by a lot of people protected by tenure who are mediocre at best.

You have the poor performing teachers making a bunch of money, taking up space in the higher-paying places, and no one can touch them because of tenure. So great teachers, taxpayers, and kids suffer while mediocrity rules the public schools.
Ok so your point is that low performing teachers are overpaid! Gotcha no argument there. Does anyone disagree with that? Had that been the tread title this thread would have been a page long.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-22-2010, 09:30 AM
 
9,209 posts, read 18,071,664 times
Reputation: 21953
I also believe that the majority of the teachers do not fit into that "excellent" category, but into the mediocre and poor categories.
I have no problem with the cream of the crop making a good salary at my expense, but I resent my tax dollars going to support the ones who are a complete waste of skin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2010, 09:34 AM
 
29,464 posts, read 33,728,825 times
Reputation: 11093
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I also believe that the majority of the teachers do not fit into that "excellent" category, but into the mediocre and poor categories.
I have no problem with the cream of the crop making a good salary at my expense, but I resent my tax dollars going to support the ones who are a complete waste of skin.
Ok, and your kids have not had good teachers but someone is wanting to pay them and it may be that there are more of them than you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2010, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Marion, IA
2,796 posts, read 5,364,113 times
Reputation: 1576
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracysam View Post
i also believe that the majority of the teachers do not fit into that "excellent" category, but into the mediocre and poor categories.
I have no problem with the cream of the crop making a good salary at my expense, but i resent my tax dollars going to support the ones who are a complete waste of skin.
+1
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2010, 04:47 PM
 
831 posts, read 1,307,868 times
Reputation: 2353
So WHAT does make a teacher a good teacher???
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2010, 04:51 PM
 
9,209 posts, read 18,071,664 times
Reputation: 21953
Now there's the makings of a whole other discussion thread!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2010, 05:03 PM
 
29,464 posts, read 33,728,825 times
Reputation: 11093
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I also believe that the majority of the teachers do not fit into that "excellent" category, but into the mediocre and poor categories.
I have no problem with the cream of the crop making a good salary at my expense, but I resent my tax dollars going to support the ones who are a complete waste of skin.
Well now you know your task. Convince your fellow local citizens of the mediocrity and that you need to rein salaries in and I suspect you would also want to have them cut. It is to late for this budget cycle but you can probably get the ball rolling for the upcoming budget process.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2010, 12:24 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,366 times
Reputation: 15
I'm confused where the OP and others are getting the idea that teachers all over the country are making this high salary (70,000 and up.) I have lived in Texas, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Missouri, and am familiar with all the surrounding states as I have looked into teaching in many areas (husband's job moves around often), and have not found any salaries that exceed 47,000 (I have my bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience at the high school level). The districts that pay 47,000, the most desirable districts in Texas, are *extremely* competitive, and you can only get in with connections and usually a Master's degree (when there are even positions open - this summer has been awful in the teaching market, and schools are all on hiring freezes). I have not made more than 27,000 each year I have taught, and my friends in education in this are of the country all have similar salaries. So yes, with the exception of maybe a few districts in PA, teachers ARE incredibly underpaid, especially for the work they do (and I'm sorry, if you have *not* worked in education and have not been a teacher, you have NO IDEA what the job requirements entail). I stopped in at my local McDonalds on a fund-raising night and noticed the manager's salary (posted due to recent hiring) exceeded my 4 year Bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience salary. SAD.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2010, 12:55 PM
 
29,464 posts, read 33,728,825 times
Reputation: 11093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasbound77 View Post
I'm confused where the OP and others are getting the idea that teachers all over the country are making this high salary (70,000 and up.) I have lived in Texas, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Missouri, and am familiar with all the surrounding states as I have looked into teaching in many areas (husband's job moves around often), and have not found any salaries that exceed 47,000 (I have my bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience at the high school level). The districts that pay 47,000, the most desirable districts in Texas, are *extremely* competitive, and you can only get in with connections and usually a Master's degree (when there are even positions open - this summer has been awful in the teaching market, and schools are all on hiring freezes). I have not made more than 27,000 each year I have taught, and my friends in education in this are of the country all have similar salaries. So yes, with the exception of maybe a few districts in PA, teachers ARE incredibly underpaid, especially for the work they do (and I'm sorry, if you have *not* worked in education and have not been a teacher, you have NO IDEA what the job requirements entail). I stopped in at my local McDonalds on a fund-raising night and noticed the manager's salary (posted due to recent hiring) exceeded my 4 year Bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience salary. SAD.
Maybe their assumptions and fact finding process are a product of not being taught by the 70K plus teachers?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2010, 01:10 PM
 
Location: St. Paul
198 posts, read 424,634 times
Reputation: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasbound77 View Post
I'm confused where the OP and others are getting the idea that teachers all over the country are making this high salary (70,000 and up.) I have lived in Texas, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Missouri, and am familiar with all the surrounding states as I have looked into teaching in many areas (husband's job moves around often), and have not found any salaries that exceed 47,000 (I have my bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience at the high school level). The districts that pay 47,000, the most desirable districts in Texas, are *extremely* competitive, and you can only get in with connections and usually a Master's degree (when there are even positions open - this summer has been awful in the teaching market, and schools are all on hiring freezes). I have not made more than 27,000 each year I have taught, and my friends in education in this are of the country all have similar salaries. So yes, with the exception of maybe a few districts in PA, teachers ARE incredibly underpaid, especially for the work they do (and I'm sorry, if you have *not* worked in education and have not been a teacher, you have NO IDEA what the job requirements entail). I stopped in at my local McDonalds on a fund-raising night and noticed the manager's salary (posted due to recent hiring) exceeded my 4 year Bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience salary. SAD.



Two thoughts:
  • If you are getting paid $27,000/year I think you are very much underpaid.
  • Why not apply for the manager's job? Schools in your area pay $27,000 because apparently some are willing to work for it. Why not tell them thanks but no thanks? Since you move around a lot I assume you won't be able to accrue the benefits of seniority anyway. You could always get back into teaching when you move to an area of the country where salaries are higher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Teaching
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top