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Old 04-05-2013, 08:34 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Why would anyone hate trees? I don't get it. Trees are beautiful, and more important, they are the source of all life.
If you grew up without them and had little to no experience with nature ... they can be seen as a foreign annoyance.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:38 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
If you grew up without them and had little to no experience with nature ... they can be seen as a foreign annoyance.
A friend's dad [grew up in Queens but moved to Glen Cove, Long Island] cut most of the trees after moving. Trees make such a mess! Get rid of 'em.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:39 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A friend's dad [grew up in Queens but moved to Glen Cove, Long Island] cut most of the trees after moving. Trees make such a mess! Get rid of 'em.
There are a lot of cement yards and astroturf patios in Queens
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:43 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
My point is street trees are used as a one-sized fits all solution for every urban street. While they do improve the look of virtually every street while they are small, as they grow out they can really begin to obscure the streetscape, and eventually make the street into a cavelike area if a closed canopy develops (which really only happens when they don't need to be trimmed for power lines).
I did suggest pruning for your example though the canopy look is interesting I do agree it would be nice to be able to see the houses, especially since they do have architectural detail. If someone is walking and paying attention they would still able to see the house they are walking by but the overall look of the block is blocked.

Quote:
FWIW, I've always found suburban areas where the houses are totally obscured by trees also ugly. I don't like front lawns much, but on the other hand, I don't think the whole "make my front yard into an impenetrable forest for privacy." really does much for neighborhood feel.
I suspect the owners have no interest in "neighborhood feel"; they'd rather feel like they're hidden away in a forest.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I did suggest pruning for your example though the canopy look is interesting I do agree it would be nice to be able to see the houses, especially since they do have architectural detail. If someone is walking and paying attention they would still able to see the house they are walking by but the overall look of the block is blocked.



I suspect the owners have no interest in "neighborhood feel"; they'd rather feel like they're hidden away in a forest.
I disagree that suburbanites have no interest in "neighborhood feel". We are as invested in our neighborhoods as you urbanites. They may like the "forest" look. My hairdresser used to have her shop in her house, in an old section of Lafayette, CO. I felt like "Little Red Riding Hood" driving over there. There are huge trees (huge by CO standards, that is), and squirrels running around all over. It was nice.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:53 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I disagree that suburbanites have no interest in "neighborhood feel". We are as invested in our neighborhoods as you urbanites. They may like the "forest" look. My hairdresser used to have her shop in her house, in an old section of Lafayette, CO. I felt like "Little Red Riding Hood" driving over there. There are huge trees (huge by CO standards, that is), and squirrels running around all over. It was nice.
My comment was not on suburbanites in general.

My point was that those who have a house hidden away by trees aren't interested in making their house look like part of the neighborhood, they're not visible. The neighborhood I grew up had a "forest look" though people's houses were still visible and not blocked off many decorated and tried to make the front interesting to look at rather than being invisible.
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
My comment was not on suburbanites in general.

My point was that those who have a house hidden away by trees aren't interested in making their house look like part of the neighborhood, they're not visible. The neighborhood I grew up had a "forest look" though people's houses were still visible and not blocked off many decorated and tried to make the front interesting to look at rather than being invisible.
Got it!
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Old 04-05-2013, 08:58 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,101,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I disagree that suburbanites have no interest in "neighborhood feel". We are as invested in our neighborhoods as you urbanites. They may like the "forest" look. My hairdresser used to have her shop in her house, in an old section of Lafayette, CO. I felt like "Little Red Riding Hood" driving over there. There are huge trees (huge by CO standards, that is), and squirrels running around all over. It was nice.
I'm not sure that's suburbanite-specific - we have some folks who live in a grand old victorian here whose yard is a "fortress" of foliage. They do it to create an "oasis of tranquility" in the city.
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,923,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Why would anyone hate trees? I don't get it. Trees are beautiful, and more important, they are the source of all life.
Hyperbole much?

Humans evolved in a forest-savanna mosaic environment in East Africa. There's some evidence to suggest that small children, before they are inoculated to think whatever the local environment is, find grassland with a spattering of trees most attractive. And indeed, that does seem to be the sort of environment that humans create when we can - we plant trees where it's too dry, and cut them down where they'd otherwise grow densely.

Regardless, algae in the oceans contribute the vast majority of oxygen to the atmosphere. One genus of blue-green algae contributes 50% alone.

Even if you want trees for all the reasons others have listed, you could do like many European cities, and put them in central courtyards, instead of out on the street. There are other alternative ways to get green next to the street too - from tall, ornamental grasses to (hopefully shortish) hedges.
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:30 PM
 
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Street trees have a number of problems: Leaf litter, blocking access (both on foot and for vehicles), and destroying streets and sidewalks with their roots. New York City at least makes them a white elephant: they plant them whether you want them or not, and insist you pay to take care of them.
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