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Old 03-11-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
How many can you check?
Three. You?
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Long Island
8,743 posts, read 12,193,444 times
Reputation: 5048
Given that I live in suburbia with a car, mass transit means...

- extra time it takes to get there
- time it takes for me to get to the stop/station in the first place
- having to wait out in the elements
- having to adhere to a schedule

I love freedom.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:25 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,674,850 times
Reputation: 1838
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I love rail, but you can't build rail everywhere and any sane public transit system is going to be bus heavy.
Well of course. But I feel that the buses should be much faster (BRT, anyone?), and should funnel traffic to and from a well-funded and expansive railway system with a moderate to high capacity, so that rail transit is never far off and has easy access.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,378 posts, read 59,846,787 times
Reputation: 54025
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The flip side is, home delivery of most goods is practical.
I can't think of too many items that are cheaper to have delivered than to go pick them up yourself.

My favorite example - 40 lb. bags of cat litter - cost me nothing to pick up when I stop on my way home from work. To have them delivered? At least $10.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
How many can you check?
Four and a half.

Is the University of Dayton a prestigious liberal arts school?

But I'd love to have a Vespa scooter ...
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:37 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,565,237 times
Reputation: 4048
It isn't necessary to build rail everywhere to provide good and comprehensive service! Generally, stops about every half-mile or so mean a quarter-mile walk from front door to transit station is sufficient. Buses have their role, but it isn't necessary to be "bus heavy" or even all that desirable.

I never saw a car as "freedom," even when I lived in the suburbs. I saw it as a ball and chain--I had to pay to own it and maintain it, feed it and care for it, sit for extra hours at work with the car parked in the parking lot instead of using my time as I saw fit. Like the song says, "freedom" isn't free, and the "freedom" provided by a car is a lot like the "freedom" provided by heroin addiction--it's a harmful, dangerous habit that encourages dependency, saps our strength, and costs lives.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:52 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,565,237 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I can't think of too many items that are cheaper to have delivered than to go pick them up yourself.

My favorite example - 40 lb. bags of cat litter - cost me nothing to pick up when I stop on my way home from work. To have them delivered? At least $10.
Picking up one or two items from the store on the way home from work is no less possible for a pedestrian or cyclist. Even 40 lb. bags of cat litter, if you have a rolling cart or a cargo bike, and unless you are trying for "crazy cat lady" status, that's not a trip you're going to make very often. Also, the one-item purchase is the dumb way to order groceries online, especially if the online delivery service charges a flat fee. Ordering one item at a time and getting charged $10 per order would be pretty dumb--so, the key is, don't do that.

Also, using your car isn't "free," it still costs money to operate and burns gas. You still have to insure and register and maintain the car. You're just optimizing its use by combining trips, which is a smart strategy to use if you want to drive less. And if ordering online, the better strategy is to order multiple items to mitigate the expense of that $10-15 shipping fee. The point of online ordering vs. a car-based shopping trip is to provide an alternative for someone who doesn't have a car, not to prove that it costs less in all circumstances. In everything, there are choices--we choose what we do (or don't want to do) to suit our circumstances, which aren't all the same.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
It isn't necessary to build rail everywhere to provide good and comprehensive service! Generally, stops about every half-mile or so mean a quarter-mile walk from front door to transit station is sufficient. Buses have their role, but it isn't necessary to be "bus heavy" or even all that desirable.
That sounds well and good if you have a spoke and hub system with lines feeding into a CBD. But what if the vast bulk of a region's employment is scattered all over the place (with a weak CBD)? Are you going to build individual rail lines to all of these suburban locations? And why would people ride them if they can drive there and park for free?
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:57 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
I love rail, but you can't build rail everywhere and any sane public transit system is going to be bus heavy.
NYC is rail heavy, London is as well, though both have buses for lower volume routes as well. Boston and dc have higher rail ridership than bus ridership but that's partly because transit ridersip is heavily downtown oriented, which is covered by rail.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
Reputation: 26661
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post

NPR (check)
Obama voter (2008 Primary) (check)
Whole Foods/TJ shopper (check)
NYT/New Yorker/Economist subscription (check)
Patagonia/Helly Hansen/Canada Goose (check)
Degree from prestigious liberal arts school (automatic)
Microbrews (check)
Indie films (check)
Fair trade coffee (check)
Farmer's market (check)
Vespa scooter (check)
Backpacking in Europe (check)

That's the short list.

I agree. And they have publications like Atlantic Cities and Streetsblog that function as one gigantic echo chamber.
I'll go ahead and check off mine for fun:

NPR (check) - NPR newbie
Obama voter (2008 Primary) (check)
Whole Foods/TJ shopper (check)
Degree from prestigious liberal arts school (automatic) - went to Berkeley, so I am sure that counts
Fair trade coffee (check)
Farmer's market (check)

But I am black so that's like minus 1000 points.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:59 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
That sounds well and good if you have a spoke and hub system with lines feeding into a CBD. But what if the vast bulk of a region's employment is scattered all over the place (with a weak CBD)? Are you going to build individual rail lines to all of these suburban locations? And why would people ride them if they can drive there and park for free?
Low ridership but if you have jobs in some secondary districts you might be able to get decent ridership
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