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Old 10-20-2016, 04:18 PM
 
4,020 posts, read 2,925,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 734accountant View Post
Look at a map, it's pretty obvious the trend will be everything east of 275 & north part of M-5 (Haggerty Connector) — Livonia, Farmington Hills, West Bloomfield (except for lakefront) — will turn sketchier.
Based on what?
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Old 10-20-2016, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Chicago
939 posts, read 843,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
I am surprise these young adults who grew up in 2000 sq ft house with large yards in suburb are comfortable in tiny 900 sqft house.
Some young adults who grew up in sterile communities designed around the car and lacking any kind of public spaces are willing to trade square footage for urbanization. Just like their parents decided that cramped 900 sq ft bungalows in cities were too small and that every member of the household needed the equivalent of a studio apartment to themselves.

Last edited by brodie734; 10-20-2016 at 04:59 PM..
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Old 10-21-2016, 03:26 AM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 24,771,258 times
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I would think most cities that border Wayne County to the west and north will be at-risk in the next 10 years.

Mid-town may also start losing its luster once the tax-abatement are up, property rises and people realize a $10,000 tax bill does not make those mid-town $350,000 lofts so appealing.
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Old 10-21-2016, 06:44 AM
 
2,173 posts, read 2,816,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
Some young adults who grew up in sterile communities designed around the car and lacking any kind of public spaces are willing to trade square footage for urbanization. Just like their parents decided that cramped 900 sq ft bungalows in cities were too small and that every member of the household needed the equivalent of a studio apartment to themselves.
Until those hipsters have kids themselves. They'll be moving to the burbs soon enough.
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Old 10-21-2016, 08:42 AM
 
11 posts, read 13,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlanderfil View Post
Based on what?
They're already turning sketchy, dated housing stock, mediocre schools, it's pretty common for premier towns to be protected/divided by a major highway.
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Old 10-21-2016, 08:59 AM
 
4,020 posts, read 2,925,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 734accountant View Post
They're already turning sketchy, dated housing stock, mediocre schools, it's pretty common for premier towns to be protected/divided by a major highway.
"They're already turning sketchy" is an opinion, not fact. Is crime getting comparatively worse there? Dated housing stock - do you have concrete evidence to suggest that housing stock in that area is aging faster than Canton, Plymouth, Northville, Novi, Walled Lake and Commerce Township or that there are fewer housing starts in that area?
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Old 10-21-2016, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Southeast Michigan
1,283 posts, read 1,072,599 times
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West River is a busy plaza. I really do miss the Kohl's, though; especially handy for a family. It was about the same in terms of thriving when we moved here in '94. The Target is an especially nice one, as is the revamped theater on the corner.
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Old 10-21-2016, 09:16 AM
 
2,952 posts, read 4,347,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlanderfil View Post
"They're already turning sketchy" is an opinion, not fact. Is crime getting comparatively worse there? Dated housing stock - do you have concrete evidence to suggest that housing stock in that area is aging faster than Canton, Plymouth, Northville, Novi, Walled Lake and Commerce Township or that there are fewer housing starts in that area?
The only one I'm qualified to opine on is Livonia, to which I would say you are generally correct. Is it "bad"? No.

When I was growing up, though, it was really kind of *the* big west side vanilla middle class suburb -- enormous and probably having a lot of characteristics of what Detroit neighborhoods of yore would have been like up until the 60s.

I had tons of friends from there.

What I can say about it is that virtually everyone left and I cannot possibly imagine them coming back, ever.

From what I understand in a lot of cases the schools have gone over the last 20 years from decent to borderline crummy.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/04/bu...pagewanted=all

"Over the past two decades, for example, the number of auto-related manufacturing jobs in Michigan has fallen 34 percent, according to Economy.com. The number of automotive jobs in Kentucky jumped 152 percent over that period."
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Old 10-21-2016, 10:21 AM
 
2,173 posts, read 2,816,890 times
Reputation: 2104
Sketchy

Another vague, qualitative term that has almost no value.
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Old 10-21-2016, 10:29 AM
 
2,173 posts, read 2,816,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnynonos View Post
The only one I'm qualified to opine on is Livonia, to which I would say you are generally correct. Is it "bad"? No.

When I was growing up, though, it was really kind of *the* big west side vanilla middle class suburb -- enormous and probably having a lot of characteristics of what Detroit neighborhoods of yore would have been like up until the 60s.

I had tons of friends from there.

What I can say about it is that virtually everyone left and I cannot possibly imagine them coming back, ever.

From what I understand in a lot of cases the schools have gone over the last 20 years from decent to borderline crummy.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/04/bu...pagewanted=all

"Over the past two decades, for example, the number of auto-related manufacturing jobs in Michigan has fallen 34 percent, according to Economy.com. The number of automotive jobs in Kentucky jumped 152 percent over that period."
I agree with you, but don't think anyone views Livonia as a top-tier suburb anymore. That's been true for around a decade and the home prices (post-2008) have adjusted to reflect this.

Livonia is the destination for families who can't afford Plymouth/Canton or (those who buy on the northwest side) Northville/Novi.
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