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Old 01-01-2018, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,681 times
Reputation: 10

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Hello,
I have lived in the city of Chicago for past 26 years. This year, the company I work for offered me a position at their Boston location near Boston Common Park. I have been reading up on the life in Boston and this forum has been very helpful. Needless to say I have been very worried about what kind of rent I can afford for the next year, should I keep my car and where should I look for rent. City or suburbs. After searching for what I can afford I naturally found myself looking at Quincy. Right now I am thinking to see if I can find a place near Hingham or in Hull to take advantage of ferries and actually live near ocean. Am I crazy as far as ferry commute? I am in sales, so my schedule is flexible and place of work opens at 10 am. I am pretty much fed up with urban living and before the offer was considering moving to Chicago suburbs. I will be in Boston within 2 weeks for couple of days and planning to rent a car and drive from downtown to Quincy and all the way to Hull peninsula end. Past 18 years I owned a condo in Rogers Park which is a very mixed area, but I had a garage and overall it is safe and I have not used public transportation in more than 20 years. It is only me and my wife. She doesn't have a job.
Any help is appreciated to put my anxieties to rest. Thank you.
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Old 01-01-2018, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,051 posts, read 3,467,992 times
Reputation: 1618
If you'd like a ferry, Quincy has one but it's not convenient unless you're in or near Marina Bay. The subway would be easier and much cheaper.

Quincy restarted the ferry from Marina Bay in Quincy a couple of years ago. Not sure how long it had been dormant. I'm unsure if it's year-round now or maybe just an experiment. I think their schedule is online.

Marina Bay would be nice...just enough removed from the hustle and bustle of the rest of Quincy, with a distant skyline view of Boston. I think they have shuttle buses to the subway in North Quincy into Boston, which from that station is only 15-20 minutes to Boston Common and the Park Street station.

Marina Bay won't feel so city, though Quincy has over 90,000 people. You'll feel safe in Quincy for the most part considering you were in Rogers Park, parts of which have crime? Yes, Quincy has some crime and social ills, but overall it's fine, unlike parts of Chicago. I never even think about it, living here since 2004..

Some here may feel Hull is still too "townie" for a newcomer. Not sure if that's fair, and I may risk backlash here by even saying it; Hingham, of course, is much wealthier than Hull, and likely has a better mix of locals and working professionals for those relocating.
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Old 01-01-2018, 08:59 AM
 
628 posts, read 446,564 times
Reputation: 1146
Is your wife from Chicago with a big social network and established friends? If so, moving to Boston and not working will be a very tough social transition. Boston is a tough place to make friends in the best case and I would imagine that Quincy would be extra hard. Also, you will need at least one car.

Quincy is currently changing, but right now is a combination of ethnic groups that socialize within their group and Quincy townies who have been there all of their lives and don't need new friends.

However, if you are young and in "try anything once" mode, I would say go for it. You can always move back if you hate it (like we did.)
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Old 01-01-2018, 09:28 AM
 
405 posts, read 159,255 times
Reputation: 238
What are you looking to spend? Are you looking to buy or rent? Most of the towns west/southwest of Boston are expensive but some can be more affordable such as Dedham, canton, Walpole, Norwood. There are commuter rail options into the city. Whatever you enjoy about Chicago you should be able to find in Boston on a smaller scale.
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Old 01-01-2018, 07:14 PM
 
149 posts, read 138,176 times
Reputation: 323
Hi Schtuka,

I lived in the Chicagoland area before I moved to Boston. Actually my brother lived in a place in Rogers Park shortly before I left so I spent quite a bit of time there, though that was many years ago.

My wife, who is from the midwest as well, and I moved to Marblehead, another ocean-side suburb, shortly after we finished grad school and we loved it. I think there is a cultural string that runs through New England coastal towns that is distinctive and quite fun if you're not originally from the East Coast. We ended up eating seafood several times a week that was fresher than anything we could get growing up. And those towns -- Hull, Glochester, Manchester by the Sea, Natant Winthrop, Marblehead, Rockport, Salem, Duxbury, Cohasset -- they're beautiful in a way that is completely different than anything in the midwest. I think it's definitely worth trying once in your life if the opportunity presents itself.

All that being said, you may not want to invite more change than you need to this upcoming year. Finding an apartment in the city or a city-ish burb might make more sense while you're adjusting to things at work and building your local social network. We ended up moving back into the city as soon as our lease was up. The commute dampened our enjoyment of the town, and we found ourselves being isolated from our friends being so far out. We're happy we did it but it wasn't quite for us as a permanent location.
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Old 01-01-2018, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,681 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalamanderSmile View Post
Is your wife from Chicago with a big social network and established friends? If so, moving to Boston and not working will be a very tough social transition. Boston is a tough place to make friends in the best case and I would imagine that Quincy would be extra hard. Also, you will need at least one car.

Quincy is currently changing, but right now is a combination of ethnic groups that socialize within their group and Quincy townies who have been there all of their lives and don't need new friends.

However, if you are young and in "try anything once" mode, I would say go for it. You can always move back if you hate it (like we did.)
Thanks for reply. My wife will be fine, not very social to TBH. She likes her fortress, books, independence and long walks. I am not concern with her social life, but more about safety of her in Hull or Quincy. I work with people and talk too much at work so, by the time I get home really do not want to see or talk to anyone.

Last edited by Schtuka; 01-01-2018 at 08:51 PM..
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Old 01-01-2018, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,681 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by such sweet thunder View Post
Hi Schtuka,

I lived in the Chicagoland area before I moved to Boston. Actually my brother lived in a place in Rogers Park shortly before I left so I spent quite a bit of time there, though that was many years ago.

My wife, who is from the midwest as well, and I moved to Marblehead, another ocean-side suburb, shortly after we finished grad school and we loved it. I think there is a cultural string that runs through New England coastal towns that is distinctive and quite fun if you're not originally from the East Coast. We ended up eating seafood several times a week that was fresher than anything we could get growing up. And those towns -- Hull, Glochester, Manchester by the Sea, Natant Winthrop, Marblehead, Rockport, Salem, Duxbury, Cohasset -- they're beautiful in a way that is completely different than anything in the midwest. I think it's definitely worth trying once in your life if the opportunity presents itself.

All that being said, you may not want to invite more change than you need to this upcoming year. Finding an apartment in the city or a city-ish burb might make more sense while you're adjusting to things at work and building your local social network. We ended up moving back into the city as soon as our lease was up. The commute dampened our enjoyment of the town, and we found ourselves being isolated from our friends being so far out. We're happy we did it but it wasn't quite for us as a permanent location.
Thank you for reply. Both of us transplants from the country that doesn't exist anymore. USSR. So, we do not have roots, but certainly have been "midwesternized". She loves NY and I don't. I have visited few cities throughout US and always liked Chicago. The other city I kind of liked was Seattle. I just figured, if we have to go then I rather live next to Ocean than in dense, loud urban area. We live in 7 unit condo building and I don't not see my neighbours in months. We all leave each other be. We spent last few years vacationing in Spain, near Barcelona and love the sea vibe. The smell, sound and obviously sea food. This is going to be 1 year lease, so I am thinking of taking a chance and try to find something we can afford near ocean.
I looked up Marblehead, pretty far at least on the map. Did you work there or traveled to Boston while in Marblehead? We are pretty much over urban life since we lived in cities all our lives.

Last edited by Schtuka; 01-01-2018 at 08:54 PM..
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Old 01-01-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,681 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
What are you looking to spend? Are you looking to buy or rent? Most of the towns west/southwest of Boston are expensive but some can be more affordable such as Dedham, canton, Walpole, Norwood. There are commuter rail options into the city. Whatever you enjoy about Chicago you should be able to find in Boston on a smaller scale.
Thank you for reply. I am trying to be cautious and look for something 1-bed/1-bath $1600-1700. Lat year in Chicago I made around $75K and moving to Boston to make more and carrier move, but most of it will be commissions. Therefore. I am trying to calculate affordability based on my salary alone. Honestly, here in Chicago we were spoiled, my mortgage with taxes and assessments were around $1100 for 3-bed, 2-bath plus 1-car garage. I never wanted to work for mortgage.
If I have to pay same price for small hole in Boston or slightly bigger hole in Hull then I rather enjoy ocean. Even if I make projected $100K in 2018, I am not keen on spending much more for only 2 of us.

Last edited by Schtuka; 01-01-2018 at 08:34 PM..
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Old 01-01-2018, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Chicago
27 posts, read 13,681 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonguy1960 View Post
If you'd like a ferry, Quincy has one but it's not convenient unless you're in or near Marina Bay. The subway would be easier and much cheaper.

Quincy restarted the ferry from Marina Bay in Quincy a couple of years ago. Not sure how long it had been dormant. I'm unsure if it's year-round now or maybe just an experiment. I think their schedule is online.

Marina Bay would be nice...just enough removed from the hustle and bustle of the rest of Quincy, with a distant skyline view of Boston. I think they have shuttle buses to the subway in North Quincy into Boston, which from that station is only 15-20 minutes to Boston Common and the Park Street station.

Marina Bay won't feel so city, though Quincy has over 90,000 people. You'll feel safe in Quincy for the most part considering you were in Rogers Park, parts of which have crime? Yes, Quincy has some crime and social ills, but overall it's fine, unlike parts of Chicago. I never even think about it, living here since 2004..

Some here may feel Hull is still too "townie" for a newcomer. Not sure if that's fair, and I may risk backlash here by even saying it; Hingham, of course, is much wealthier than Hull, and likely has a better mix of locals and working professionals for those relocating.
Thank you for reply. I am not abandoning Quincy and Red line option. I just found out here on forum that Wollaston station is closed for repairs. Dodged the bullet here.
I am just wondering about how feasible is the ferry commute. Will I find a parking next or my wife will have to drive me there every morning. How crowded the ferry may be at 9 am. I know that monthly pass is $308 and subway is $87. Red line is actually more convenient for me than ferry, so that is a major factor too. We would like to keep the car, but I do not want to drive it to work which is I am not sure about, because here I have to drive constantly to see clients. That is something will be clear in my visit to know where my potential clients will be from. City or suburbs. I should mention that I am in high-end kitchen and bath design, working for German company.
Rogers Park was getting much better till 2008 crash. Then some it went down a bit where I live and some areas more or less. Lack of subway was the reason it didn't enjoy development of Andersonville or Ravenswood.
Does "townie" means hostile? Racist? I am kind of Korean and my wife is kind of Ukrainian.

Last edited by Schtuka; 01-01-2018 at 09:04 PM..
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Old 01-02-2018, 03:20 AM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,051 posts, read 3,467,992 times
Reputation: 1618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schtuka View Post
Thank you for reply. I am not abandoning Quincy and Red line option. I just found out here on forum that Wollaston station is closed for repairs. Dodged the bullet here.
I am just wondering about how feasible is the ferry commute. Will I find a parking next or my wife will have to drive me there every morning. How crowded the ferry may be at 9 am. I know that monthly pass is $308 and subway is $87. Red line is actually more convenient for me than ferry, so that is a major factor too. We would like to keep the car, but I do not want to drive it to work which is I am not sure about, because here I have to drive constantly to see clients. That is something will be clear in my visit to know where my potential clients will be from. City or suburbs. I should mention that I am in high-end kitchen and bath design, working for German company.
Rogers Park was getting much better till 2008 crash. Then some it went down a bit where I live and some areas more or less. Lack of subway was the reason it didn't enjoy development of Andersonville or Ravenswood.
Does "townie" means hostile? Racist? I am kind of Korean and my wife is kind of Ukrainian.
As far as the Wollaston Red line being closed, yes, I think it starts this week for a year or two. Not sure, but I should be better informed. I don't get off there often, as I use North Quincy, one stop closer to Boston. I think the trains will still travel thru Wollaston, or maybe riders after that point will need to change for buses if riding away from Boston and Quincy.

"Townie" is generally not a flattering word. It describes locals who've lived in the same neighborhood or nearby all of their lives, usually not so accepting of outsiders, newcomers, gays, different cultures or classes. Usually of lower education and not well travelled. There are many exceptions, as my friend lives in the same house he grew up in, 20 miles north of Boston but is a retired teacher, well travelled, cultured, lots of volunteer work, etc. There's an equivalent in the Chicago area and all others. Not sure if it's a different word.

Quincy still has that townie feel in some ways despite many Chinese or folks from India living here, but since I moved here 13 years ago, there are more and more luxury apartments and condos with young professionals. My area is very Chinese as are parts of Wollaston. Used to be very Irish here, predominantly, if I'm not mistaken. You've travelled a lot and have good income so may find it too low class in parts of Quincy but I like it. Reasonable housing prices for being so close to Boston.

We have a poster here who lives on Wollaston Hill who's Ivy league educated and chooses to buy here rather than her nearby affluent town.
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