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Old 01-02-2015, 11:16 PM
 
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Hi,

I've just started learning some basic HTML and CSS, but I would like to get serious about website creation and programming. Are there any free resources that could give me a good site building foundation and maybe cover some advanced stuff? How much code would I have to learn before I can call myself an entry-level programmer and actually work? Where should I start if I'm serious about it?
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Old 01-03-2015, 02:34 AM
 
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Code is easy, writing secure code is the tricky part.

I'll tell you how I learned, I'm not one to be able to read say a book. I need hands on experience. About 10 years ago as was learning HTML/CSS I installed a phpBB forum. I started out making modifications to it and then you needed to go into the script manually edit lines. Might as well have been Chinese at that point but since I knew what the mod did I started understanding the syntax. Lots of reading examples at php.net etc.

I can pretty much read anything written in php as long as I have a reference manual handy. Writing it is a whole other story.
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Old 01-03-2015, 10:26 AM
 
7,249 posts, read 5,709,178 times
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Codecademy is pretty decent and free.

They have python/ruby (including a rails tutorial)/PHP/javascript/jQuery.
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Old 01-03-2015, 10:59 AM
 
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If you want to be an entry level programmer to be able to land a job, you will need to focus on one (or a handful) of technologies/languages and learn them well. As a programmer, it's better to know one language well, than know a few, but not really well.

So start out by picking a language (in addition to HTML/CSS). JavaScript is most likely the best one to choose. It's used on the frontend (in the web browser) as well as in the backend (on the server), and is growing rapidly right now.
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Old 01-03-2015, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Wandering.
3,545 posts, read 5,682,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
If you want to be an entry level programmer to be able to land a job, you will need to focus on one (or a handful) of technologies/languages and learn them well. As a programmer, it's better to know one language well, than know a few, but not really well.

So start out by picking a language (in addition to HTML/CSS). JavaScript is most likely the best one to choose. It's used on the frontend (in the web browser) as well as in the backend (on the server), and is growing rapidly right now.
I second this sentiment.

Master HTML / CSS and JavaScript as these three make up the bulk of modern web development.

Once you have them down, you can always add a server side language / framework (ASP.NET, PHP, Ruby, etc).

Most server side languages really just give you high level ways of creating HTML on the fly, so learning HTML and CSS is still key to being able to build things in these languages.
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Old 01-03-2015, 11:36 AM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,979,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skunk Workz View Post
Once you have them down, you can always add a server side language / framework (ASP.NET, PHP, Ruby, etc).
In this day in age, I wouldn't even switch to any other language for server side. Just use JavaScript for server side. As you get better at JavaScript, you'll get better at both, browser/client and server side at the same time.

I say, stick to JavaScript.

Not to say that there's anything wrong with .Net, Ruby, Go, etc. But I would recommend new programmers stay away from older languages such as PHP.
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Old 01-03-2015, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Denver
9,356 posts, read 16,140,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skunk Workz View Post
I second this sentiment.

Master HTML / CSS and JavaScript as these three make up the bulk of modern web development.

Once you have them down, you can always add a server side language / framework (ASP.NET, PHP, Ruby, etc).

Most server side languages really just give you high level ways of creating HTML on the fly, so learning HTML and CSS is still key to being able to build things in these languages.
As a server-side Java (JEE) guy I disagree, server-side programming is very low level with many advanced design patterns from Software Engineering being applied. Server-side programming get's you into concepts like Object inheritance, caching, Data Access, Model View Controller, Facades, Singletons, Clustering, Message Brokering..etc.

Even the very simple Database access (JDBC/ODBC, Hibernate, Spring) will be much more low level than HTML/CSS/JS. Server-side programming is more aligned to Software Engineering than being a Website UI developer.

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Old 01-03-2015, 01:17 PM
 
980 posts, read 596,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
In this day in age, I wouldn't even switch to any other language for server side. Just use JavaScript for server side. As you get better at JavaScript, you'll get better at both, browser/client and server side at the same time.

I say, stick to JavaScript.

Not to say that there's anything wrong with .Net, Ruby, Go, etc. But I would recommend new programmers stay away from older languages such as PHP.
I couldn't agree more. Stick to HTML/CSS/JavaScript for the browser. Use JavaScript on the server.

Look into the industry and see what they are using. Most tech companies won't be using PHP, Java, etc. .Net has popularity in the enterprise world. JavaScript and Go are the current languages.
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Old 01-03-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Denver
9,356 posts, read 16,140,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Hospitality View Post
I couldn't agree more. Stick to HTML/CSS/JavaScript for the browser. Use JavaScript on the server.

Look into the industry and see what they are using. Most tech companies won't be using PHP, Java, etc. .Net has popularity in the enterprise world. JavaScript and Go are the current languages.
Huh? Java and PHP are the most popular server-side languages in the Industry.

Look at any major non-Microsoft product (SAP, Oracle, IBM, Apple, Amazon, VMware, EMC) their web-applications are written in Java.

Most personal web-sites are written in PHP.

Top 10 Programming Languages for Job Seekers in 2014

https://www.odesk.com/blog/2014/03/w...anguages-2014/

Quote:
PHP
Used by 75 percent of all web servers, PHP is a general-purpose server-side scripting language. The chief advantages of PHP are that it is open source, with a huge online community to support it, and that it’s compatible across multiple platforms. PHP is most often used by websites with lower traffic demands.

Java
According to a study conducted by W3Tech, Java is the server-side language of choice for large-scale websites with a high volume of traffic. Sam’s Club, Amazon and Apple App Store use Java-based web frameworks.

One potential reason for its popularity among high traffic websites is that Java frameworks outperform other language frameworks in raw speed benchmark tests. That means faster server-based web applications for large scale websites. Java Servlets, JSP and WebObjects are examples of server-side solutions that use Java.

Last edited by Mach50; 01-03-2015 at 01:46 PM..
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Old 01-03-2015, 01:44 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,979,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mach50 View Post
Huh? Java and PHP are the most popular server-side languages in the Industry.

Look at any major non-Microsoft product (SAP, Oracle, IBM, Apple, Amazon, VMware, EMC) their web-applications are written in Java.

Most personal web-sites are written in PHP.

Top 10 Programming Languages for Job Seekers in 2014

https://www.odesk.com/blog/2014/03/w...anguages-2014/
There's a difference between what is most commonly used today vs what they are moving towards. As a developer you would want to stay with the industry and not fall behind.

Facebook: PHP -> JavaScript
Dow Jones: Java -> JavaScript (some .Net)
Google: Java/C++/Python -> Go
eBay: Perl/Java/.Net -> JavaScript
LinkedIn: Java -> JavaScript
PayPal: Java -> JavaScript
Yahoo: PHP/C++ -> JavaScript

Java has a good hold on scaling web applications. I JavaScript and Go are great contenders to take its spot. Go is more likely because of its multithreading capabilities. PHP is used all over the place (then again, so are mainframes), but it has little to offer compared to the competition; other than the amount of developers and support available at the moment.
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