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Old 10-29-2018, 06:32 PM
 
4,748 posts, read 2,268,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I worked with a guy that said his Mom used to make Tacos with potatoes in them. Never seen that before but he pointed out that "Taco" is generic like "Sandwich."
I once had a goal of trying every type of taco style available in Mexico City. Impossible.

The challenge is the guisado type places because they'll have 8-10 different containers of fillings they can use to make tacos or chalupas, everything from pork to beef to cactus leaves to potatoes to boiled eggs to every combination in-between. With a taco cart on just about every other corner in CDMX and every guisado place randomly serving whatever their grandma makes you just keep stumbling upon new stuff.

The tacos fillings in Mexico that I see offered the least in in USA are probably cueritos, cachete, buche, and pancita. The former two I loved, the last two = occasional texture issues.
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Old 10-29-2018, 07:08 PM
 
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Flour tortillas are not as ancient as corn ones, but they do date back to the middle ages in Mexico. So anytime I hear someone say that flour tortillas are not "authentic" Mexican food, then I know that person doesn't know what they are talking about.
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Old 10-29-2018, 07:51 PM
 
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Oh yeah man, flour tortillas are a staple up in Chihuahua and Sonora. Also can't get far in other parts of Mexico without seeing someone serving up gringas al pastor. I'm not sure the background of gringas but they are everywhere.

Lots of places in Mexico also offer quesadillas with flour tortillas.
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Old 10-29-2018, 11:42 PM
 
70 posts, read 10,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I once had a goal of trying every type of taco style available in Mexico City. Impossible.

The challenge is the guisado type places because they'll have 8-10 different containers of fillings they can use to make tacos or chalupas, everything from pork to beef to cactus leaves to potatoes to boiled eggs to every combination in-between. With a taco cart on just about every other corner in CDMX and every guisado place randomly serving whatever their grandma makes you just keep stumbling upon new stuff.

The tacos fillings in Mexico that I see offered the least in in USA are probably cueritos, cachete, buche, and pancita. The former two I loved, the last two = occasional texture issues.
I see cachete tacos everywhere in New York (usually listed as cabeza, though)
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Old 10-30-2018, 07:29 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,919 posts, read 1,938,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Lots of manchego too, I got hooked on that stuff as the texture suits me a bit more than Oaxaca.
Ahh yes, Manchego. That one is actually Spanish and is usually more expensive. I do love it as well.
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Old 10-30-2018, 09:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyRules View Post
Too bad so much of it is unhealthy, especially the traditional dishes in Texas. I was raised on Tex Mex (which is called "Mexican food" in Texas).

But I really like some of the healthier dishes also. Great flavors and combinations of ingredients. I like pretty much everything that is made with the traditional ingredients. So it's hard for me to narrow down my favorites. I like rice, beans, tortillas, beef, chicken, cheese. etc. And I usually like to cover everything lightly with a salsa.
It depends on how one defines Mexican food. Most Americans are exposed to americanized Mexican restaurants that serve numbered combo plates filled with rice and re-fried beans and any assortment of greasy tacos, burritos and enchiladas. Starting off with fried tortilla chips and ending with deep fried ice cream. Very unhealthy and not the average meal for Mexicans.

Saying one likes Mexican food is like saying one likes American food. What does that mean? Its like saying you like Chinese food but only go to buffets or liking Italian food meaning your order delivery pizza.

If you go to a real Mexican restaurant that caters to people from Mexico there are lots of Caldos (broth bases soups with meat and vegetables) tacos with shells that are heated up but not fried and usually lots of seafood. It depends on where in Mexico the restaurateur is from.

If you live in a city that has a decent population of people from Mexico search out a local spot. They are often small and in strip malls. Go in and have them bring you what the locals like best. You might like what you get and most certainly it will be quite different than the #5 combo plate you might be used to.
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Old 10-30-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
Ahh yes, Manchego. That one is actually Spanish and is usually more expensive. I do love it as well.

Actually, Manchego cheese from Spain is totally different than Mexican Manchego cheese. From Wikipedia:


Quote:
Mexican manchego cheese was introduced to Mexico from the Spanish region of La Mancha, but it tastes quite different, as it is made with a mixture of cows’ and goats’ milks in Mexico rather than sheep’s milk. It has a buttery taste and melts well.[1][3] This cheese is made in available in all parts of Mexico and can be found in the United States, as well.[1] Normally, manchego is not aged, but the aged version is called queso manchego viejo. This version is more firm and intense in flavor. It is often served grated over dishes.[1][6] In northern Mexico, this cheese can be called asadero, as well.[3]

I'm not particularly fond of the spanish version, but wish I could get the Mexican version more easily.
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Old 10-30-2018, 12:28 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
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^^^ They can call it whatever they want, but it's not Manchego and it's not the same. The Mexican one is from Cow and Goat and the other from sheep's milk, so it bears little similarity. The name Manchego is designated as a "Protected designation of origin" or PDO for short. They cannot market it under that name. It's sort of like "Sparkling White Wine" and Champagne, the latter can only be used for one type of product from one place.

This is also from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchego

Quote:
In Mexico and Spanish-speaking areas of the United States, manchego or queso tipo manchego (manchego-type cheese) is the name given to a cow's milk cheese similar in taste to Monterey Jack. It melts well and is used as both a table cheese and for cooking. Apart from the name, this cheese has little in common with the Spanish variety.[11]
It also goes on to say
Quote:
To be designated as queso manchego, the cheese must satisfy the following requirements:[4]

It must have been produced in an area that is restricted to designated parts of the provinces of Albacete, Ciudad Real, Cuenca, and Toledo that lie within the La Mancha region.
It can be made only with the whole milk of sheep of the manchega breed that are raised on registered farms within the designated area.
The cheese must have been aged for a minimum of 60 days (30 days for cheeses weighing up to 1.5 kg or 3.3 lb) and a maximum of two years.
The cheese must be produced by pressing in a cylindrical mould that has a maximum height of 12 cm (4.7 in) and a maximum diameter of 22 cm (8.7 in).
Manchego cheese can be made from pasteurised or raw milk; if the latter, it may be labelled as artesano (artisan). The only permitted additives are natural rennet or another approved coagulating enzyme and sodium chloride (salt).
https://www.cheese.com/manchego/

Geographical indications and traditional specialities in the European Union

As far as the taste, that's subjective. I happen to like Feta cheese which also comes from sheep's milk or a mix of sheep and goat. Some people don't like it all.

This is probably TMI and a bit off topic but since you brought it up....
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
14,314 posts, read 17,526,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post

This is probably TMI and a bit off topic but since you brought it up....

Sorry if I hit a sore point and offended.
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:27 PM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
2,919 posts, read 1,938,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
Sorry if I hit a sore point and offended.
No offense, no sore point, all good
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