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Old 08-25-2014, 12:35 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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From Baltimore to NYC, the local accent has the short a split. Plenty of people in the NYC region don't have the stereotypical accent. But almost everyone (as well as further south to Baltimore) has that feature. Do had and bad have the same vowel sound? If not, you probably the split.
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Old 08-25-2014, 12:36 PM
 
342 posts, read 394,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
First of all, Baltimore couldn't be a southern state because it's a city. Second of all, it is an indisputable historical fact that it was southern. It was a border state within the context of the Civil War, but that only means it was a slave state that didn't secede from the Union (it didn't have much of a choice).

No need to revise history, man.
First, I'm a woman, man.

Second, Maryland was a border state. An indisputable fact it was southern? Yeah it was southern colony. It is also an indisputable fact that it was northern state. It was like a mixed person, they are both.

Today Maryland is the north. You sound like people who think that the Spanish or Italians aren't white because they arent German or English or people who think that a guy who is 1/4 Jewish is a Jew and cant be anything but that. It is a really narrow minded viewpoint. Either way I hope you stop fighting the civil war.

I never fought it and it is so painfully obvious that MD is a northern state. I am still curious: Will you be able to rebuke any of the countless statistics that make MD a northern state? Why is it that it FEELS northern to me - an objective immigrant who has no interest in taking sides? Why does it FEEL southern when I get into Virginia?
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Old 08-25-2014, 12:37 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I guess you can have vowel shifts that are similar to those in southern places. But that's not to say that that feature makes it identical to southern accents. Just like non-rhoticity doesn't make a New York and Alabama accent identical.
Though vowel features make a certain New Orleans accent sound oddly similar to a NYC accent though.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpFDNTo4DNg

[first speaker] Doesn't sound the same, but a few similarities.
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Old 08-25-2014, 12:39 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,594,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILikeMike91 View Post
LOL!!! Especially the last video with Italians talking. The one younger guy has a native Philadelphia accent, the other guys are from ethnic enclaves or out of towners. Great try cherry picking videos of people who LIVE in Philadelphia but who are either from outside or are Italian. Cookin wit' Cousin Vinny? Seriously? I might as well get a Mexican and say that is the New York accent. LOL!!! I am talking about the NATIVE PHILLY accent. We can get videos of people in Baltimore who have that tough guy Vinny-from-the-Bronx accent too, but they aren't BALTIMORE accents. Just like this isn't the PHILADELPHIA ACCENT. You might be able to fool someone unfamiliar with the area who has watched too many Rocky movies, but not me!! Good try though!

Do you really think that all the professional linguists are wrong and you are right?


REAL PHILLY ACCENT


REAL PHILLY ACCENT #2



REALLY PENNSYLVANIA ACCENT THIS IS HOW PEOPLE IN SMALLTOWN ALLTENTOWN, YORK, PA SOUND

Give me a break with that NY-style nonsense. Like I said I am from Canada, I live here now, I hear all of your accents. People in PA sound like the third link not that Guido nonsense you posted. They sound EXACTLY like Baltimore. Pittsburgh is a different story. Its funny how people think people in Philly sound like Brooklyn based off of movies and chery picked video. sound Do you honestly think all the professional linguists are wrong? They ALL put Baltimore and Philadelphia together because they speak with an almost identical accent!!!
You have no idea what you are talking about. Stick to talking about DC or Canada because you know nothing about the Philadelphia accent. Every example of an Philadelphia accent that I posted are people from the city of Philadelphia. The union worker that I posted is the exact example of the general Philadelphian accent. Also if you hear ever hear a real born and raised south Philadelphian still living in south philly (and the transplant south Philadelphians in south Jersey) talk and they would sound very similar to the examples of the South Philadelphia accent. The bottom line is besides the o sound (which is the only reason why some linguist link the two in the first place) the general Philadelphia accent is very different from the Baltimore accent and the South Philadelphia accent is even more different than the Baltimore accent.

More examples of real Philadelphia accents

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71dO...e_gdata_player

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKpQ...e_gdata_player
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Old 08-25-2014, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Do you rebuke or refute statistics? I rebuke Satan, not so sure about stats. Can stats even be refuted? The stats are what they are. Now I can refute a claim based on stats. Is that what you mean?
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Old 08-25-2014, 12:47 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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The Philly accent sounds vaguely similar to a NYC accent, including the Italian-American cook guy. Though he had an added "tough guy" sound to him. He said "orange" with an "ah" sound at the beginning like a New Yorker but "on" with aw sound rather than the ah sound a New Yorker would use.

From my visits to Philly (stayed in South Philly two nights once), that guy didn't seem atypical just a bit more extreme.
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Old 08-25-2014, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
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I definitely heard some NY characteristics in the PA accent. Some of my family is from PA and I grew up in New Haven, CT -- So NY and CT is what I hear almost entirely.

I don't know anyone personally from Philly, but what I saw in those videos had a very "northern" sound to it (as it should). Maryland leans more with a southern sound than they do with a northern sound in my opinion. The only time I spent in Baltimore was at a convention which was mostly people from the Northern states and Virginia/Delaware so accents varied.
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Old 08-25-2014, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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The Bradley Cooper Philly accent video at 1:18 is the PERFECT Philadelphia accent.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZP1QEA954yA

Doesn't get better than that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
You have no idea what you are talking about. Stick to talking about DC or Canada because you know nothing about the Philadelphia accent. Every example of an Philadelphia accent that I posted are people from the city of Philadelphia. The union worker that I posted is the exact example of the general Philadelphian accent. Also if you hear ever hear a real born and raised south Philadelphian still living in south philly (and the transplant south Philadelphians in south Jersey) talk and they would sound very similar to the examples of the South Philadelphia accent. The bottom line is besides the o sound (which is the only reason why some linguist link the two in the first place) the general Philadelphia accent is very different from the Baltimore accent and the South Philadelphia accent is even more different than the Baltimore accent.

No offense it sound like you are the one with a skewed TV image of the Philadelphia accent. Some people in Philly sound a bit New Yorkish, but half your videos are Italians. They sound like that in Baltimore and freakin' New Orleans too. An Italian accent is not a Philadelphia accent. This is why Philly, Baltimore and south Jersey are always lumped together into a very specific linguistic region by linguists.
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Old 08-25-2014, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,446 posts, read 7,515,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
No offense it sound like you are the one with a skewed TV image of the Philadelphia accent. Some people in Philly sound a bit New Yorkish, but half your videos are Italians. They sound like that in Baltimore and freakin' New Orleans too. An Italian accent is not a Philadelphia accent. This is why Philly, Baltimore and south Jersey are always lumped together into a very specific linguistic region by linguists.
I think you have to consider that it's because Italians are a strong part of the identity of Philadelphia, much more so than Baltimore. It wasn't that it was cherry-picked, as you seem to be implying.

Also, do you really believe that all Italian-Americans sound the same? I can remember going to a historic, family-owned Italian restaurant in Springfield, Illinois. They were bona fide Italian-Americans, but had noticeably thick Midwestern accents, so I have no idea where you're getting that idea from. Accents are regional regardless of ethnicity.

Last edited by Duderino; 08-25-2014 at 03:35 PM..
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Old 08-25-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I think you have to consider that it's because Italians are a strong part of the identity of Philadelphia, much more so than Baltimore. It wasn't that it was cherry-picked, as you seem to be implying.

Also, do you really believe that all Italian-Americans sound the same? I can remember going to a historic, family-owned Italian restaurant in Springfield, Illinois. They were bona fide Italian-Americans, but had noticeably thick Midwestern accents, so I have no idea where you're getting that idea from. Accents are regional regardless of ethnicity.
Okay, let's talk about the black populations of these cities - which after all form the ethnic majorities - and both Baltimore and Philadelphia are solidly southern sounding cities, just like Chicago, Cleveland, and a whole slew of other otherwise northern cities.. The Italians from Boston to Baltimore have a distinct accent, and the reason why the New Orleans accent sounds like New York is because of Italian influence. As long as they congregate in ethnic enclaves, they tend to carry specific accents. The Hispanics who live in all Hispanic neighborhoods the next town over do not sound "American" in their accents, even if born here. Just like in Miami. But a Hispanic guy who is assimilated and integrated with white Americans or black Americans will probably carry an "American" accent. This may make us uncomfortable to talk about, but ethnicity plays a huge role in how we talk, and Italians are a prime example.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Also, do you really believe that all Italian-Americans sound the same? I can remember going to a historic, family-owned Italian restaurant in Springfield, Illinois. They were bona fide Italian-Americans, but had noticeably thick Midwestern accents, so I have no idea where you're getting that idea from. Accents are regional regardless of ethnicity.
I didn't say that and obviously not every Italian sounds that way, but if they congregate in Italian neighborhoods and form enclaves like from Boston to Baltimore they tend to have an "Italian" accent. Look at Hispanics - Hispanics all over the country sound just like Hispanics people from Miami. It's not a coincidence.

I think if we took a Hispanic accent from Texas and called it the Texas accent it would be misleading.
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