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Old 11-08-2019, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Pocopson
353 posts, read 142,449 times
Reputation: 371

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FKD19124 View Post
and please describe what you consider to be lower class people???
In my experience, the biggest bashers of Philly are the Acela crowd; their only view of Philadelphia is from the view of the train. From their perspective, North Philly seems like the bulk of the city and Baltimore even seems more livable.
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Old 11-08-2019, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
26,129 posts, read 24,898,664 times
Reputation: 32387
Quote:
Originally Posted by FKD19124 View Post
and please describe what you consider to be lower class people???
People who don't own good mustard.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
5,551 posts, read 2,711,899 times
Reputation: 3500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
People who don't own good mustard.
"Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon?"

I'm not sure I agree with thedirtypirate that "lower class people" are the biggest Philly-bashers; it seems to me that that group falls into two distinct categories:

--the "Acela crowd" Patmcpsu points to; that Washingtonian who started that Twitter thread and many of those who responded to her belong in this camp. However: given what of Baltimore one sees from the Amtrak tracks, I don't see how anyone would make a significant distinction between it and Philadelphia on the livability/attractiveness scale if that's what they have to go on.

--the older natives, moslty blue-collar, who formed their opinions about the city's trajectory in the 1960s and haven't updated their views since then despite all the changes that have taken place and continue to take place.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:38 AM
 
42 posts, read 9,589 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
However: given what of Baltimore one sees from the Amtrak tracks, I don't see how anyone would make a significant distinction between it and Philadelphia on the livability/attractiveness scale if that's what they have to go on.
Ha, that's the first thing I thought of; I take the train from 30th street to Baltimore penn station several times a year and the bombed-out Baltimore neighborhoods definitely do not come off any better than what people riding through north Philly would see. And in D.C. you're approach is through some industrial/warehouse district, which isn't anything fancy. Also, Baltimore penn station is nice, but it doesn't hold a candle to coming back home to 30th street station. I also prefer it to D.C. Union; it's very impressive but doesn't feel as authentic as 30th street or Grand Central.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
26,129 posts, read 24,898,664 times
Reputation: 32387
Quote:
Originally Posted by skintreesnail View Post
Ha, that's the first thing I thought of; I take the train from 30th street to Baltimore penn station several times a year and the bombed-out Baltimore neighborhoods definitely do not come off any better than what people riding through north Philly would see. And in D.C. you're approach is through some industrial/warehouse district, which isn't anything fancy. Also, Baltimore penn station is nice, but it doesn't hold a candle to coming back home to 30th street station. I also prefer it to D.C. Union; it's very impressive but doesn't feel as authentic as 30th street or Grand Central.
I've never been in the Baltimore station. That pieces of art? out front reminds me of the movie The Day the Earth Stood Still.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:37 AM
 
Location: New York City
1,250 posts, read 718,714 times
Reputation: 1878
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post

--the older natives, moslty blue-collar, who formed their opinions about the city's trajectory in the 1960s and haven't updated their views since then despite all the changes that have taken place and continue to take place.
These people are a dime-a-dozen in Delaware County.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,766 posts, read 26,876,398 times
Reputation: 12023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I feel compelled to respond as someone who's posted about some negative attributes about DC in my experience as a former resident of both the city and immediate suburbs for most of my young adulthood.
But you also mentioned you lived in Burleith, which makes your overall perception of the city understandable albeit more than a bit inaccurate.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,686 posts, read 2,892,773 times
Reputation: 3054
Quote:
Originally Posted by FKD19124 View Post
and please describe what you consider to be lower class people???

People who don't appreciate the things I mentioned. I didn't mean class as in a socioeconomic way. I meant like class as being 'classy'. you can be a classy mailman or you can be a classless president.

As a younger person, my experiences have been the people who are interested in music, art, restaurants, history, etc. tend to have a better opinion of the city versus people who don't care for those things and are just looking for more of a generic experience.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,766 posts, read 26,876,398 times
Reputation: 12023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Philly is as authentic and real as cities come. And it actually doesn't try to actively push out its poor as a revitalization strategy, unlike most other major cities.
If you go and talk to old heads who grew up in the Bottom I'm sure you'll find a difference of opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
If that's what it takes to become more "palatable" to white bread suburban tourists, who, frankly, are just uncomfortable with seeing people who are down on their luck or don't want to challenge their sense of middle-class complacency--I don't think the city gains anything by selling itself out and compromising its morals.
That's happening in every city, Philly included. It just hasn't happened to the same extent.
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Old 11-08-2019, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,686 posts, read 2,892,773 times
Reputation: 3054
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
"Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon?"

I'm not sure I agree with thedirtypirate that "lower class people" are the biggest Philly-bashers; it seems to me that that group falls into two distinct categories:

--the "Acela crowd" Patmcpsu points to; that Washingtonian who started that Twitter thread and many of those who responded to her belong in this camp. However: given what of Baltimore one sees from the Amtrak tracks, I don't see how anyone would make a significant distinction between it and Philadelphia on the livability/attractiveness scale if that's what they have to go on.

--the older natives, moslty blue-collar, who formed their opinions about the city's trajectory in the 1960s and haven't updated their views since then despite all the changes that have taken place and continue to take place.
Maybe I could have said it a different way. I don't disagree with you. I would actually say there is a third sterotype; the Pennsylvanian hater. The person who grew up in PA and probably came here one time on a class trip as a child, can't tell you anything specific about Philadelphia other than they don't like it and think it's a dump. It's similar to the older native group you mention, but the natives will eventually defend their territory. Native haters love taking to the internet to bash some parts of the city, but don't you cross the line and bash their neighborhood. The Pennsylvanian hater thinks of every part of Philly the same way.

In terms of the first group, you term the "acela" crowd, I would say Philadelphia is generally somewhat of an enigma to these people. People hear it has a good restaurant scene, they know it has a lot of history, but they also think it's very gritty. My gf grew up in CT. One of her best friends lives around DC and the other lives in Boston. When they visit us they remark about how much more livable and lively it is compared to what they thought it was going to be like.

I still want the OP to answer me on what 'big city amenities' he believes that Philly lacks?
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