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Old 10-03-2009, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
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I think that what people want from life changes as they age.

If people are used to dealing with the hustle and bustle of the city their whole lives, they sometimes want to go someplace more quiet and peaceful. On the other hand, some people crave the convenience of the city, after living outside it for decades for various reasons, and move into the city for retirement.

For people who go south, they generally do it to avoid the winter. Many people get sick of the winter as they get older. It's harder to get around, they may be afraid of falling on the ice, and they may not physically be able to deal with the snow anymore. Up north, they could become housebound for much of the winter, so they go south.

Some people fall into 'vacation' syndrome when they retire. They go to live at a place where they liked to vacation (say, Florida) and then find that living there is totally different from vacationing there. A certain percentage of people who move someplace for retirement come back. The problem these last years for people from the northeast has been that they can't afford to come back. Once they sold their property up here, it appreciated so much that they couldn't afford a place where they used to live.
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Old 10-03-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,462,974 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Older people have less cold tolerance.

Plus, ice and snow contribute to a lot of hip fractures.
And less heat tolerance.

I can see hip fractures from slipping on ice, which is why folks tend to avoid walking on ice.

But how do you fracture your hip on snow?
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Old 10-03-2009, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,462,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
regarding cost of living----------some people use the taxes on land as a part of cost of living.

Unless you are living in a tent, I fail to see how land would be calculated into cost of living.

I can find parcels of land in my state that have very low taxes. However, if I were to build a house and live on that land,my taxes would skyrocket because of the taxes now being based on the value of that house.
To compare the taxes on a 1/4 acre of land in one state verses in another state, is a handy and quick comparison for property taxes.

To say a 2bdrm house, can't really be compared as easily. One 2bdrm house might be $40k, while another 2bdrm house might be $500k.

To get an honest feel for comparing taxes you need to discuss things that are the same, like land.
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Old 10-03-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,462,974 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzleman View Post
I think that what people want from life changes as they age.

If people are used to dealing with the hustle and bustle of the city their whole lives, they sometimes want to go someplace more quiet and peaceful. On the other hand, some people crave the convenience of the city, after living outside it for decades for various reasons, and move into the city for retirement.

For people who go south, they generally do it to avoid the winter. Many people get sick of the winter as they get older. It's harder to get around, they may be afraid of falling on the ice, and they may not physically be able to deal with the snow anymore. Up north, they could become housebound for much of the winter, so they go south.

Some people fall into 'vacation' syndrome when they retire. They go to live at a place where they liked to vacation (say, Florida) and then find that living there is totally different from vacationing there. A certain percentage of people who move someplace for retirement come back. The problem these last years for people from the northeast has been that they can't afford to come back. Once they sold their property up here, it appreciated so much that they couldn't afford a place where they used to live.
I can see that.

Both North and South have cities and rural areas.

It seems that for some folks' their metaphors for 'South' is more tied to being rural, and 'North' as being urban.

I lived in Charleston SC for a while, and I do consider that to be urban.

I have visited Georgia and Florida a few times, and while both do have somewhat rural regions, they also have urban regions; I wanted to live in an area that is far more rural than either of those states. Which is largely why I choose to live in the North.
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Old 10-03-2009, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, Az (unfortunately still here)
2,550 posts, read 3,970,297 times
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Most people move to the southern states when they retire, because it's warmer. Yes, the southern states do get cold during the winter, but not as bad as in the north...BRRR!!

I'm from the south and plan to stay for the rest of my life. Hopefully next year or 2, I can move back to Texas or Florida. Not sure right now. I'm tired of the mountains and desert here...YUCCCK!!! Too dry for me, that's for sure. I love the moisture back home. It had always cleared my skin up (since moving here in Arizona, I've had a bad case of dermititis, because of the dryness and aridness here...UGGGHH!!).
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Old 10-03-2009, 06:05 PM
 
617 posts, read 1,301,258 times
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Because I was stupid. North Carolina Bible Belt is pretty myopic and backward thinking. Probably will move when the market gets better.
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Old 10-05-2009, 10:34 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
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Many retire to the south due to less tolerance for cold.
However, I think the Lakes Region of NH is one of the best places to retire in the north. Winters are fairly sunny and temps are not tough to take. The other three seasons are spectacular.
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Old 10-05-2009, 10:36 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
And less heat tolerance.

I can see hip fractures from slipping on ice, which is why folks tend to avoid walking on ice.

But how do you fracture your hip on snow?
Ice cleats are excellent for walking on hard crusted snow and ice. I used them all the time back during the cold winters of the 70s and 80s in the Midwest. I dug them back out again when I moved to New England.
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Old 10-06-2009, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,134 posts, read 12,390,523 times
Reputation: 13984
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Seriously, I think they want to get away from the cold, dark winters and ice. It probably is less expensive too.

I'm of retirement age but I would never retire in the south because, as you say, it's too HOT and humid.

Look at the cost of living in a place like Boston -- it's unbelievable. There's no place anywhere remotely near Boston that's affordable, as far as I'm concerned. That's a main reason people are moving south. Anyway, lots of people don't want to live in a city. New England has gorgeous countryside but that's very expensive too.

OP, you can go and visit them in the winter and learn to appreciate other things than city living. Beaches, walking, biking, nature......or just plain relaxing.
My living expense in the south is half of what it was up north.

We've been working on our retirement budget, retirement is still a few years away, and my wife and I have determined we can live very comfortably on half our retirement income. the other half will go for things like travel and cruises and stuff.

With property taxes and added utility costs our house up north would easily cost an additional $800 a month just to live there as compared to here.

Also add I haven't seen a snow flake in four years. I like that.
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Old 10-06-2009, 11:15 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capt chill View Post
Because I was stupid. North Carolina Bible Belt is pretty myopic and backward thinking. Probably will move when the market gets better.
You are letting your feelings about a particular area cloud your perspective on the south in total. There are areas that are very progressive and you can't paint any area of the country with a single stroke.
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