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Old 02-18-2015, 06:23 AM
 
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I've found this file about the history of Scots-Irish

The Scots-Irish: Becoming America

I always thought they were more Irish than Scottish/Scots-Irish in the US but after reading several articles about it , I wonder if the Scots-Irish aren't more.
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Old 02-18-2015, 12:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smash XY View Post
I've found this file about the history of Scots-Irish

The Scots-Irish: Becoming America

I always thought they were more Irish than Scottish/Scots-Irish in the US but after reading several articles about it , I wonder if the Scots-Irish aren't more.



Paul Blanshard one time head of New York's Department of Investigations and Accounts, educated at Michigan, Harvard and Columbia, states, ''Almost all of the original 'Irish' immigrants who came to the 13 colonies in the 17th and 18th centuries were from Ulster

Today of the estimated 40 million people in the United States with ''Irish'' blood in their veins an estimated 56% can trace their roots back to the 18th century Ulster-Scots settlers.
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Paul Blanshard one time head of New York's Department of Investigations and Accounts, educated at Michigan, Harvard and Columbia, states, ''Almost all of the original 'Irish' immigrants who came to the 13 colonies in the 17th and 18th centuries were from Ulster

Today of the estimated 40 million people in the United States with ''Irish'' blood in their veins an estimated 56% can trace their roots back to the 18th century Ulster-Scots settlers.
That's why I don't like the term Scots-Irish, people think they are either Scottish or Irish, while in fact they have no Irish ancestry. Ulster Americans would be a much better term. The author Jim Webb say they are about 27 million and I think that's a fair estimation. I'm really into the topic right now and I try to know which states have more Scots-Irish ancestry .
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Old 02-19-2015, 11:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smash XY View Post
That's why I don't like the term Scots-Irish, people think they are either Scottish or Irish, while in fact they have no Irish ancestry. Ulster Americans would be a much better term. The author Jim Webb say they are about 27 million and I think that's a fair estimation. I'm really into the topic right now and I try to know which states have more Scots-Irish ancestry .
If you used the term Ulster American, or Ulster-Scot (I use that one sometimes), Americans don't know what you're talking about. Americans have used Scots-Irish forever because then people here know who they are talking about...in general, I guess.
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Old 02-20-2015, 12:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smash XY View Post
That's why I don't like the term Scots-Irish, people think they are either Scottish or Irish, while in fact they have no Irish ancestry. Ulster Americans would be a much better term. The author Jim Webb say they are about 27 million and I think that's a fair estimation. I'm really into the topic right now and I try to know which states have more Scots-Irish ancestry .
From what I know they were mostly in Pennsylvania, Delaware area but then many of them moved down the Great Wagon Road into Tennessee, Virginia and other Southern states. They had around 15 Presidents of Ulster descent. The nearest one to being born in Ulster was Andrew Jackson. Excerpts from a few books.



"...Ulster began to send out swarms to America; shipload after shipload of men trained to labor and habits of independence, sought the American shores; year after year the tide rolled on without once ebbing; and many thousands of these descendants of the emigrants from Scotland, disdaining to be called Irish, filled the upper country of Pennsylvania, Virginia and the Carolinas. Ulster, in Ireland, has been an exhaustless hive, a perennial spring..." Sketches of North Carolina by WH Foote 1864


'Moreover,it is interesting to note that they did not regard themselves as Irish. In fact,nothing infuriated them more than to be classed as Irish' ''Ulster Sails West''1943. by W.F.Marshall

''We are surprised to hear ourselves termed Irish people. It is hard in this new land to be identified with the very people to whom we have always been opposed''. It is a great pity the term used had not been Ulster/Ulster-Scots as it surely would have been more accurate and would have prevented the Irish and so-called Irish-Americans from claiming Ulster Scottish achievements in America to their own advantage. 'To Ulster's Credit' 1981 by Sam Allen

'Thus appears one of the first uses of the much-despised term ''Scotch-Irish.'' These people were not Irish and, did not relish being associated with them' ''West From Shenandoah'' 2004.by Thomas A.Lewis
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Old 02-20-2015, 12:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
If you used the term Ulster American, or Ulster-Scot (I use that one sometimes), Americans don't know what you're talking about. Americans have used Scots-Irish forever because then people here know who they are talking about...in general, I guess.
I know what you mean. However, even if you have spoken and used the word Ulster they will have then have heard it and might make their own inquiries. If they (or anyone ) just types in 'Ulster' or Ulster-Scots in their search engine it will bring up a lot of Ulster stuff.

Ulster also is more accurate as that is where most ( if not all ) of them came from.
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Old 02-20-2015, 01:27 PM
 
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[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 02-20-2015, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Seems they played a leading role in the 'making of America'.


The Scots Irish certainly played a leading role in the making of Pittsburgh.

The Pittsburgh dialect borrows a lot from the language of Ulstermen, even though their descendants are definitely a small minority here nowadays.

Do You Speak American . Sea to Shining Sea . American Varieties . Pittsburghese | PBS
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Old 02-20-2015, 01:58 PM
 
Location: FROM Dixie, but IN SoCal
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Okay, I freely admit that I only "scanned" the entire thread before responding. Here's why.

It is obvious from my family tree, and from my conversations with my living forebears, that about one-quarter of my ancestors were Scots-Irish. It is also obvious to me, based on personal experience, that at least one of my forebears -- my paternal grandfather -- completely "disowned" the Irish part. He would simply NOT have anyone apply the word "Irish" to him or any of his family, past or present. However,the records I have been able to acquire clearly disagree. My grandfather's disownment, of course, is the subject of an entirely different thread.

Now, I feel obliged to comment that my OTHER ancestors -- the Choctaw -- clearly liked the Irish, the Scots, and the Scots-Irish. That's why I, today, am one-half Choctaw and one-quarter Scots-Irish. (For those who must absolutely-positively know, the other quarter is German - another group of serious, hardy folk.)
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Old 02-20-2015, 03:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by I_Like_Spam View Post
The Scots Irish certainly played a leading role in the making of Pittsburgh.

The Pittsburgh dialect borrows a lot from the language of Ulstermen, even though their descendants are definitely a small minority here nowadays.

Do You Speak American . Sea to Shining Sea . American Varieties . Pittsburghese | PBS

I think Scots-Irish is mostly used in America and although the Scots from Ulster were not too happy about it they went along with it as it did help differentiate them from the Irish. Pittsburgh gets a mention in this clip.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQ5x...ature=youtu.be
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