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View Poll Results: Which city is the capital of Black America in your opinion?
NYC Area 51 5.37%
Phil 17 1.79%
DC 93 9.79%
Atlanta 554 58.32%
Memphis 10 1.05%
New ORleans 24 2.53%
Houston 16 1.68%
Seattle 10 1.05%
Chicago 26 2.74%
Detroit 66 6.95%
Other (include in your reply) 10 1.05%
There is none. 73 7.68%
Voters: 950. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-30-2018, 10:05 PM
 
12,346 posts, read 17,962,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I donít. I think those are the actual numbers. If it didnít count the patrons on bourbon street, I would think there would be more.
The Classic has more numbers than Bayou Classic. Like a poster mentioned previously, the dome canít support massive tailgating like Legion Field can. Bayou Classic is really dope, though.
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Old 10-30-2018, 10:11 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,309 posts, read 2,155,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Because of history to keep it short. Before the Great Migration and after Blacks live in the South. It was around 92% that lived in the South then it declined to 53% by the 70s-90s. Now it's probably back up to 57/58%.
i think blacks are originally from africa.
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Old 10-31-2018, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,426 posts, read 26,528,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
My point is in dense, urban, vibrant cities like DC, the hustle and bustle is always there so DC is going to be busier than New Orleans and you’re really not going to know if people are there for Howard’s Homecoming or not. DC just has more going on and way more people. Events don’t change the vibrancy in DC. We have millions of people for various events all year and you would never know week to week because DC is always vibrant. Most people out and about in DC aren’t there for Howard’s Homecoming, it’s just people going out and it happens to be Howard’s Homecoming.

I think Howard’s Homecoming being famous has more to do with DC than Howard. DC was considered the hottest mega club city for black people for decades. That’s where the reputation came from. When people think of the hottest cities for African American parties, DC is always near the top of the list. New Orleans is not.
You’re changing the subject. You said earlier that Howard homecoming is the largest hbcu event in the country. That has clearly been debateable. On your second paragraph, I guess I’m young and all but I never heard that reputation for DC being the hottest mega club city for black people for decades.
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:57 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,792 posts, read 3,261,395 times
Reputation: 2272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
You’re changing the subject. You said earlier that Howard homecoming is the largest hbcu event in the country. That has clearly been debateable. On your second paragraph, I guess I’m young and all but I never heard that reputation for DC being the hottest mega club city for black people for decades.
I think it was for about a strong 10 years at least without a doubt. From about 1998-2008, maybe 2010, no city could compare mega clubs with DC's Dream/Love, H20, Ibiza, Park, DC Live/VIP, Fur, the Ritz, Palladium, Lux Lounge, the DC tunnel etc (all for the Urban crowd). Many of these were 3 or 4 story venues with huge amount of square footage. Some of these mega clubs could hold up to 15,000 people when combining outdoor tent areas with the inside. (And this doesn't even touch the local thriving go-go scene at the time.)

Marc Barnes and Taz Wube were the hottest two black club owners/promoters in the country in the 2000's. Think Ghost from Power before Power even existed. Las Vegas All Star Weekend 2007 Marc and Taz dominated the hottest parties that weekend from Jamie Foxx's and Lebron James all star parties, they did this for Super Bowl's in Houston and New Orleans as well. You'd have to really be in tuned to the urban party scene to get the feel on the street for who was top dog. People from Atlanta, NY, Philly, the Bay and LA in those years would often acknowledge DC's elite mega club scene for the urban crowds.

Google the Gilbert Arenas birthday bash in 2007 at Love nightclub hosted by Diddy, Marc and Taz had been doing it since P. Diddy was at Howard back in the early 90's, bringing Biggie Smalls to town often.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...ubs-has-ended/

Last edited by the resident09; 10-31-2018 at 07:12 AM..
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:58 AM
Status: "South via Califas" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Virginia Beach
3,895 posts, read 2,564,234 times
Reputation: 4179
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
I agree with you about multiple centers. When I lived in LA, I noticed Houston and Dallas seemed to have more importance to Black Californians with Atlanta being a distant third (Black Angelenos would often regard Atlanta with mild curiosity at best, indifference at the worst when I told them I moved to LA from there). When I lived in Atlanta, the connections between there and black people from NYC, Philly, and Detroit (straight shot up Interstate 75) were far more pronounced than connections with black people from Los Angeles or Oakland.

The DMV area is a bit more complicated because of the transient population here, the fact that it's considered a mecca/capital of Black America to a lot of people, and attracts a lot of people from other Black Capitals. I know a lot of black transplants from Atlanta (don't get me started on the whole ATL vs. DC debate that a lot of buppies love to engage in), Detroit, Chicago, NYC, Philly, and Houston. DC definitely gets a lot of recognition from Black folks from the Carolinas and Southside Virginia, but I will say that DC's appeal seems to pull from far more metro areas than ATL in a broad sense, but deep southerners don't really care for it.

Also, I lived in Mississippi, and the ties between there and Chicago were the most pronounced for a northern city while Detroit was a distant second. As for southern "capitals", coastal black Mississippians seemed to prefer Houston, while Dallas was more popular with Central Mississippians, and Atlanta had a universal pull, but Mississippi is definitely the transition zone in the south between the Southeast and the Western South (TX/OK/LA) with a lot of influences from both regions colliding there.

Obviously, a lot of these patterns are holdovers from the Great Migration in the mid-20th century.
We're on the same page here...

In Northern Cali (Bay/Sac/Stockton/on to Fresno even), there seems to be a strong tie amongst blacks to the Southeast--the Carolinas and Atlanta. Nowhere in California, including NorCal, do blacks have stronger ties to the Southeast than the western South. My paternal family is from Oklahoma and my maternal side is from Arkansas by way of Louisiana, so I think you're absolutely on point that Black California in general has stronger ties to the western South than anywhere; but Atlanta is probably a little more notable in NorCal than Southern California...

There are too many people in this thread who just aren't acknowledging that there are about 9-10 cities that could be called black capitals. Los Angeles is a black capital, for a variety of reasons, and I've known several native East Coast blacks through the years who relocated to LA. This is to say nothing of the pull LA has for many blacks west of Texas...

To piggyback off your Mississippi point, Chicago is definitely the draw for people from Memphis. I would say Chicago is historically the draw for black Arkansans too, but in this new millennium, I think the pendulum has swung towards DFW, particularly in Little Rock and Central Arkansas. California would be third place, as i mentioned earlier i have family in both Sacramento and Los Angeles who trace their roots to Arkansas...

I think Atlanta and DC are tied among overall draw. I think both are black capitals, and both draw marginally from far out areas (West Coast, Midwest), but both are very region specific. The shift from black draw between the two occurs somewhere in central North Carolina, because Charlotte and SC is definitely more influenced by Atlanta, but The Triangle and eastern NC is more DC and NY influenced. DC's draw/sphere of influence actually isn't that large, and I think we tend to exaggerate the importance of both cities to black America (not that they aren't important, but as I told stanley earlier, we are fudging it a little)...

Along the East Coast, anywhere north of Raleigh-Durham/ENC is in NY's overall sphere; DC is a sub-sphere within that. DC's biggest influence period is in Maryland and Virginia. As soon as you cross the outer borders of those states, DC's influence wanes rather quickly. DC is widely regarded in the black community but I can make the argument it isn't nearly as influential as some people around here seem to believe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Youíre changing the subject. You said earlier that Howard homecoming is the largest hbcu event in the country. That has clearly been debateable. On your second paragraph, I guess Iím young and all but I never heard that reputation for DC being the hottest mega club city for black people for decades.
I grew up in Virginia right outside DC and I've never heard DC was "the hottest club city for black people for decades". In VA and MD? Believable. Even in peripheral areas outside the borders of DC and MD, sure...

I have never heard of any black Upstate NYers, much of whom are hours away from NYC, regarding DC as a must-see; I extrapolate this to black Carolinians outside central and eastern NC; anybody in the Midwest and mid-South; and everybody west of the Mississippi...

I love DC. I grew up around the city and it will always be a special place for me. The online DC attitude is starting to wear on me. It is not this universal black epicenter--there isn't ONE; it I'd one of several but is not quite what these Marylanders around here believe it is. I grew up just south of DC and I never have felt compelled to attend Howard homecoming. Sure, I heard of it, and I know people who have been, but I attribute this more to location. I never heard DC is the "biggest club city for blacks", but I can agree within a certain proximity, sure, maybe...
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Old 10-31-2018, 07:03 AM
Status: "South via Califas" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Virginia Beach
3,895 posts, read 2,564,234 times
Reputation: 4179
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I think it was for about a strong 10 years at least. From about 1998-2008, maybe 2010, no city could compare mega clubs with DC's Dream/Love, H20, Ibiza, Park, DC Live/VIP, the Ritz, Palladium, Lux Lounge, the DC tunnel etc (all for the Urban crowd). Many of these were 3 or 4 story venues with huge amount of square footage (And this doesn't even touch the local thriving go-go scene at the time.)

Marc Barnes and Taz were the hottest two black club owners/promoters in the country. Think Ghost from Power before Power even existed. Las Vegas All Star Weekend 2007 Marc and Taz dominated the hottest parties that weekend from Jamie Foxx's and Lebron James all star parties, they did this for Super Bowl's in Houston and New Orleans as well. You'd have to really be in tuned to the urban party scene to get the feel on the street for who was top dog. People from Atlanta, NY, Philly, the Bay and LA in those years would often acknowledge DC's elite mega club scene for the urban crowds.
Only rebuttal I have to make, is if one has to be "in tune" to a relatively small and niche circle, is it really something that "everybody" knows/should know/is aware of?

Just countering these earlier comments on DC's draw within the black community. I don't think you are unaware, so I'm just talking lol. A lot of black people go out to clubs and such. An extremely small minority of said crowd actually knows the scene on an intimate level or cares to know who is hosting the party or where they are from; people just want a good time...

I can't get in the debate of whether DC is a better club or homecoming city than anywhere else. But I do know it isn't the only notable city for said events, or even the "most" notable, which is the comment that compelled me to speak out within this thread...
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Old 10-31-2018, 07:20 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,792 posts, read 3,261,395 times
Reputation: 2272
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Only rebuttal I have to make, is if one has to be "in tune" to a relatively small and niche circle, is it really something that "everybody" knows/should know/is aware of?

Just countering these earlier comments on DC's draw within the black community. I don't think you are unaware, so I'm just talking lol. A lot of black people go out to clubs and such. An extremely small minority of said crowd actually knows the scene on an intimate level or cares to know who is hosting the party or where they are from; people just want a good time...

I can't get in the debate of whether DC is a better club or homecoming city than anywhere else. But I do know it isn't the only notable city for said events, or even the "most" notable, which is the comment that compelled me to speak out within this thread...
No, i didn't mean it like that and probably should have worded differently. People who wanted to know where to go for black/urban crowd mega parties knew that DC was on a short list of places to go. It was widely known by New Yorkers, Philly people etc of where to go for that level of black parties. NY, Philly, Baltimore, Jersey, VA, NC, in those decades we're referring to, had no comparable clubs that catered to black nightlife on that level. DC (remember I'm talking early/ mid 2000's) was #1, and probably Atlanta #2. People from coast to coast and knew this, so it wasn't just some "niche".

I remember standing on the stage at Love in DC years back and this guy from the Bay Area just in awe of how a "upscale" night club with that many black folks even existed, he said they had nothing like it in the Bay. And this was just one of the mega clubs like this in DC.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:14 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
908 posts, read 530,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I think it was for about a strong 10 years at least without a doubt. From about 1998-2008, maybe 2010, no city could compare mega clubs with DC's Dream/Love, H20, Ibiza, Park, DC Live/VIP, Fur, the Ritz, Palladium, Lux Lounge, the DC tunnel etc (all for the Urban crowd). Many of these were 3 or 4 story venues with huge amount of square footage. Some of these mega clubs could hold up to 15,000 people when combining outdoor tent areas with the inside. (And this doesn't even touch the local thriving go-go scene at the time.)

Marc Barnes and Taz Wube were the hottest two black club owners/promoters in the country in the 2000's. Think Ghost from Power before Power even existed. Las Vegas All Star Weekend 2007 Marc and Taz dominated the hottest parties that weekend from Jamie Foxx's and Lebron James all star parties, they did this for Super Bowl's in Houston and New Orleans as well. You'd have to really be in tuned to the urban party scene to get the feel on the street for who was top dog. People from Atlanta, NY, Philly, the Bay and LA in those years would often acknowledge DC's elite mega club scene for the urban crowds.

Google the Gilbert Arenas birthday bash in 2007 at Love nightclub hosted by Diddy, Marc and Taz had been doing it since P. Diddy was at Howard back in the early 90's, bringing Biggie Smalls to town often.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...ubs-has-ended/
The DC Club scene has drastically changed over the past decade, especially in the black/urban segment. And all I'll say is the Gidewon Brothers in Atlanta could've definitely given Barnes/Wube a run for their money in that department starting around the 2000s or so.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:30 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
908 posts, read 530,173 times
Reputation: 1679
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
We're on the same page here...

In Northern Cali (Bay/Sac/Stockton/on to Fresno even), there seems to be a strong tie amongst blacks to the Southeast--the Carolinas and Atlanta. Nowhere in California, including NorCal, do blacks have stronger ties to the Southeast than the western South. My paternal family is from Oklahoma and my maternal side is from Arkansas by way of Louisiana, so I think you're absolutely on point that Black California in general has stronger ties to the western South than anywhere; but Atlanta is probably a little more notable in NorCal than Southern California...

There are too many people in this thread who just aren't acknowledging that there are about 9-10 cities that could be called black capitals. Los Angeles is a black capital, for a variety of reasons, and I've known several native East Coast blacks through the years who relocated to LA. This is to say nothing of the pull LA has for many blacks west of Texas...

To piggyback off your Mississippi point, Chicago is definitely the draw for people from Memphis. I would say Chicago is historically the draw for black Arkansans too, but in this new millennium, I think the pendulum has swung towards DFW, particularly in Little Rock and Central Arkansas. California would be third place, as i mentioned earlier i have family in both Sacramento and Los Angeles who trace their roots to Arkansas...

I think Atlanta and DC are tied among overall draw. I think both are black capitals, and both draw marginally from far out areas (West Coast, Midwest), but both are very region specific. The shift from black draw between the two occurs somewhere in central North Carolina, because Charlotte and SC is definitely more influenced by Atlanta, but The Triangle and eastern NC is more DC and NY influenced. DC's draw/sphere of influence actually isn't that large, and I think we tend to exaggerate the importance of both cities to black America (not that they aren't important, but as I told stanley earlier, we are fudging it a little)...

Along the East Coast, anywhere north of Raleigh-Durham/ENC is in NY's overall sphere; DC is a sub-sphere within that. DC's biggest influence period is in Maryland and Virginia. As soon as you cross the outer borders of those states, DC's influence wanes rather quickly. DC is widely regarded in the black community but I can make the argument it isn't nearly as influential as some people around here seem to believe...
I noticed more blacks from Oakland/Bay Area than LA/SoCal when I lived in Atlanta, BUT their numbers were still pretty small compared to Northeasterners and Midwesterners. This is anecdotal of course. LA does have a strong pull for Blacks on the West Coast/West of the Rockies due to the fact that it's one of the few spots on that side of the country that has a significant black population. When I grew up in San Diego, LA felt VERY black in comparison and most of our family/relatives were in that area as opposed to other parts of the West Coast. The Texas-California connections are pretty pronounced with blacks out on the West Coast/West of the Rockies, and there was also a Little New Orleans and a Creole population in Los Angeles in the past due to the vast number of Louisianans who moved there during the GM. One of my older aunts in Los Angeles married a Creole man from SW Louisiana who migrated to California when he was a child. Growing up in SD, I met quite a few older blacks who had roots in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. Quite a few moved there for the military in SD and stayed, and a number moved up to LA and Oakland/SF due to all the shipyard, defense contracting, and manufacturing work available in the mid-20th century. Another thing I noticed is that Atlanta is not held in a high regard by black Californians like it is in other parts of the country. Partially due to it being in the Southeast (and all the stereotypes that come with that), and the sheer distance of it, so its off the radar for many. While many Californians are well traveled, I knew quite a few who have never been East of the Rockies, or Texas or anywhere outside the state for that matter (not even Las Vegas)

DFW and Houston are vastly more popular with Black Midwesterners and West Coasters, BUT I will reiterate that a lot of black Michiganders have relocated to ATL over the years. I have relatives from West Michigan who have relocated there, and many of their friends and distant relatives have made the move to Georgia since the 2000s as well. One of my friend's wives is from Saginaw, and her family relocated there and they had a vast social network already in place when they moved to the area due to the sheer number of people from there who relocated to ATL. I guess it's that straight shot down I-75... For what ever reason, I noticed far more Michiganders than Ohioans when I lived in Georgia, even though I know there were some Great Migration ties between GA and OH way back when, and Cincinnati is only about an 8 hour drive from ATL. Black Chicagoans seem to prefer DFW/Houston much much more. I knew a few blacks from Saint Louis in ATL, but even they told me a lot of them high tail it for Texas instead of ATL nowadays. Atlanta is a massive airline hub due to its easy proximity from the Northeast, Midwest, and the Southeast, and the migration patterns since the 1970s definitely reflect that.

As for your comments about DC, I think it's because of the fact that DC specializes in a few things very well, but Atlanta has a lot more of a universal appeal due to the more diverse economy, lower cost of living, entertainment/media niche, and more pursuits in entrepreneurship compared to DC. It's more "exciting" to talk about what celebrity you work for or which businesses you own as opposed to having a GS-13 and a security clearance in a lot of circles. A lot of people are also turned off by DC's high cost of living, colder weather, and reputation for being "stuck up," (most southerners I know absolutely detest the area) but it is admired as a place with lots of black professionals with well-paying jobs. Like I said, the whole ATL vs. DC debate is a thing in a lot of Buppie circles, and as someone who's lived in both, I try to be as unbiased and nuanced about my preferences when asked because there are aspects about both cities that I like and dislike.

Last edited by biscuit_head; 10-31-2018 at 08:39 AM..
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,426 posts, read 26,528,464 times
Reputation: 9300
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I think it was for about a strong 10 years at least without a doubt. From about 1998-2008, maybe 2010, no city could compare mega clubs with DC's Dream/Love, H20, Ibiza, Park, DC Live/VIP, Fur, the Ritz, Palladium, Lux Lounge, the DC tunnel etc (all for the Urban crowd). Many of these were 3 or 4 story venues with huge amount of square footage. Some of these mega clubs could hold up to 15,000 people when combining outdoor tent areas with the inside. (And this doesn't even touch the local thriving go-go scene at the time.)

Marc Barnes and Taz Wube were the hottest two black club owners/promoters in the country in the 2000's. Think Ghost from Power before Power even existed. Las Vegas All Star Weekend 2007 Marc and Taz dominated the hottest parties that weekend from Jamie Foxx's and Lebron James all star parties, they did this for Super Bowl's in Houston and New Orleans as well. You'd have to really be in tuned to the urban party scene to get the feel on the street for who was top dog. People from Atlanta, NY, Philly, the Bay and LA in those years would often acknowledge DC's elite mega club scene for the urban crowds.

Google the Gilbert Arenas birthday bash in 2007 at Love nightclub hosted by Diddy, Marc and Taz had been doing it since P. Diddy was at Howard back in the early 90's, bringing Biggie Smalls to town often.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...ubs-has-ended/
I agree in that time period that DC was perhaps the hottest city for black mega clubs in the US. There were many and were popular. Canít argue that. Just the decades part, I never heard that reputation. Super Bowls and All Star games are a little different. I know in both the cities you named, you had multiple promoters from different cities. Donít know which one was the biggest.
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