U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-17-2010, 11:15 PM
 
857 posts, read 1,346,168 times
Reputation: 186

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
That is 56 Jobs postings for Sunday, January 17, 2010. I check the Classifieds every few days, and that's up from about 35-40 the last two times I checked.

Flagstaff, AZ last summer when I was there only had 5 to 10 jobs each day, and that's for a county of 150,000 persons, versus 50,000 persons in LaPlata County.

Albuquerque and Boulder only had a handful of jobs per day when I drove through those places last summer . . .
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-17-2010, 11:21 PM
 
857 posts, read 1,346,168 times
Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
I'm sure you can move to any Colorado town and find work of some type. The financial realities come thick and fast. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
There are more perspectives out there that have yet to be offered. They will be.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2010, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2,561 posts, read 4,867,738 times
Reputation: 2219
Colorado Mountain Towns For 20- And 30- Somethings;  What Is A Trustafarian?-boulder-colorado.jpg-feel-gd.jpg
Boulder by far has the largest number of trustafarians in the state, the town practically invented them. In all my years of living there nothing shocks me, met more than my share of hippies with millions.
Those of you who live in Boulder know exactly what I'm talking about. Run on out and buy yourself
a Tesla Hybrid and stop on over to Freakies just in time for 4:20.

One of the funniest things years ago was watching a friend of mine who's dad owned one of the largest food labels world wide work for ten dollars an hour along side me for the so called employ discount at Spyder Active Wear (actually just bored.) His Family had nine homes around the country, and he himself owned several homes,cars Ferrari ect.,and had an own personal worth worth well into the 20 million range at age 22..His idea of working hard was waking and baking(blond haired Bob Marley complete with pooka shell necklace/ diamond sudded nose ring) and working maybe six hours a week. Boulder is full of these people. Welcome to hippie Crit paradise.


For the OP, don't let people on here totally discourage you, I have known people that start out with very little but persist in their dreams and make it in many of the best high country towns. It can be a difficult,and slow to start, but isn't that the case so often with anything worth achieving. Starting out around the Front Range might just be your initial first step though..good luck to you.

Last edited by Scott5280; 01-18-2010 at 12:10 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,899,377 times
Reputation: 2435
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
No - no - no - they are a negative influence especially w/ their meth labs.
I'm curious as to whether you are an American or have you lived in the U.S.? Rich trust fund babies don't make meth. Why would they need to do this? If they wanna consume drugs they just buy them. And they're not going to buy a junky drug like meth which is a drug for the "low class" people.

Quote:
I want to find a community that I can become a part of, joining the City or Town boards or Forest Service providing service in outdoor education, trail building, forest fire prevention, etc. In fact, those activities might come BEFORE finding job, or, the volunteering could lead DIRECTLY to a job.

What's the best place for this? Durango? Santa Fe? Summit County?
If you have a kind of hippy/alternative mentality, then you may enjoy Santa Fe. But you'd also need to be comfortable living and working around the Hispanic culture, because probably 60% of the city is Hispanic, and they dominate the politics down there.

Quote:
I would surmise that in Boulder, the place is closed to volunteering by a tightly knit cliche of business interests running the city, but that's just a guess on what little I know. What do you think?
I wouldn't agree.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
Reputation: 6815
Couple questions here for the OP. Don't landlords usually want to know you have a steady source of income before they rent to you? If you're planning on arriving without a job and you don't have a pile of cash how are you going to find a place to live?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,447,829 times
Reputation: 9287
CCCVDUR wrote:
Until my proposal is defeated with specific economic, socioeconomic, or other information relevant to relocation, then my proposal still stands as a legitimate possibility.
Your proposal is unquestionably a legitimate possibility. The real question is wether or not YOU can transform your legitimate proposal into a thriving reality. Perhaps you can...but you gotta do it to find that answer. Others who have been there and done that are simply telling you that the odds are stacked against you, and that you can improve your odds by gaining a better understanding of what you are proposing to get yourself into. No one has said that it is impossible. Their is much truth in the old cliche...where there's a will there's a way. Good luck!

My favorite Thoreau quote goes something like this. What the old folks tell you that you cannot do, you try and find out that YOU CAN!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 10:51 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
That is 56 Jobs postings for Sunday, January 17, 2010. I check the Classifieds every few days, and that's up from about 35-40 the last two times I checked.

Flagstaff, AZ last summer when I was there only had 5 to 10 jobs each day, and that's for a county of 150,000 persons, versus 50,000 persons in LaPlata County.

Albuquerque and Boulder only had a handful of jobs per day when I drove through those places last summer . . .
Not that it will do any good, because you don't want to hear it, but let me 'splain something to you. One of the reasons their are open jobs advertised in Durango is that most of those jobs do not pay enough to permit somebody to live there without tapping into their savings, living in a 1BR condo with 4 roommates, or working 70 hour weeks at 3 jobs just to try to make ends meet. So, guess what?--there is a lot of turnover.

The other factor in many job advertisements is that they often MUST be advertised, even if it is a near 100% probability that the job will be filled internally. This can be especially true for public agencies. The unspoken truth is that many such jobs are advertised publicly when the agency has no intention of filling them from the outside--advertising is a CYA to prevent discrimination or unfair hiring practices charges.

Now, if you are determined enough, well-qualified enough, willing to sacrifice enough, willing to put up with enough, you can either get the exact job you want or live exactly where you want. Very, very few people--even the best and the brightest--can manage to do both. That is the tradeoff.

I'm living proof--I worked several years in a very specialized and demanding job that only a handful of people (less than 100) work at in the entire United States. I went after the job and got it because I had the experience, impeccable credentials, professional connections, and personal integrity necessity to secure it. I loved the work, but it also meant leaving Colorado for several years. Again, the tradeoff.

Get this straight--Colorado is a pretty place, but it doesn't have 10 million people living in it because it is NOT an easy place to make a living over the long haul--especially away from the Front Range cities. 80% of Colorado's population lives in that lousy metro corridor--there's a reason: that's where the work is. Those Front Range cities, and other places all across the US are full of EX rural Colorado residents because rural Colorado is such a difficult place in which to make a living. For every rural Colorado resident that manages to stay, there are probably a hundred who don't make it. And those who do manage to stay usually wind up making considerable personal and financial sacrifices to do so. I'm sorry that you are so damned unwilling to accept that as fact--it's you, not me, that will have to accept the consequences of finding out that truth the hard way.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 11:16 AM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,014,998 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Not that it will do any good, because you don't want to hear it, but let me 'splain something to you. One of the reasons their are open jobs advertised in Durango is that most of those jobs do not pay enough to permit somebody to live there without tapping into their savings, living in a 1BR condo with 4 roommates, or working 70 hour weeks at 3 jobs just to try to make ends meet. So, guess what?--there is a lot of turnover.

The other factor in many job advertisements is that they often MUST be advertised, even if it is a near 100% probability that the job will be filled internally. This can be especially true for public agencies. The unspoken truth is that many such jobs are advertised publicly when the agency has no intention of filling them from the outside--advertising is a CYA to prevent discrimination or unfair hiring practices charges.

Now, if you are determined enough, well-qualified enough, willing to sacrifice enough, willing to put up with enough, you can either get the exact job you want or live exactly where you want. Very, very few people--even the best and the brightest--can manage to do both. That is the tradeoff.

I'm living proof--I worked several years in a very specialized and demanding job that only a handful of people (less than 100) work at in the entire United States. I went after the job and got it because I had the experience, impeccable credentials, professional connections, and personal integrity necessity to secure it. I loved the work, but it also meant leaving Colorado for several years. Again, the tradeoff.

Get this straight--Colorado is a pretty place, but it doesn't have 10 million people living in it because it is NOT an easy place to make a living over the long haul--especially away from the Front Range cities. 80% of Colorado's population lives in that lousy metro corridor--there's a reason: that's where the work is. Those Front Range cities, and other places all across the US are full of EX rural Colorado residents because rural Colorado is such a difficult place in which to make a living. For every rural Colorado resident that manages to stay, there are probably a hundred who don't make it. And those who do manage to stay usually wind up making considerable personal and financial sacrifices to do so. I'm sorry that you are so damned unwilling to accept that as fact--it's you, not me, that will have to accept the consequences of finding out that truth the hard way.
The best thing I think is for the OP to move and see for himself.

He has the grand dream he'll be fully employed, live a grand life of leisure activities and excitement as well as cultivating agriculture at 8000 feet and living on acreage. And don't forget those royalty checks rolling in from all that creative writing.

The reality is that he has an old junker car that wont last another 1000 miles, few qualifications or contacts and it sounds like not a lot of money, hence he'll be dependent on a job(s), not a business.

Is the OP's dream crap or stupid? No I don't think so, but from my experience that is something that takes 20-40 years to put in place.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,651,296 times
Reputation: 1681
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
The best thing I think is for the OP to move and see for himself.

He has the grand dream he'll be fully employed, live a grand life of leisure activities and excitement as well as cultivating agriculture at 8000 feet and living on acreage. And don't forget those royalty checks rolling in from all that creative writing.

The reality is that he has an old junker car that wont last another 1000 miles, few qualifications or contacts and it sounds like not a lot of money, hence he'll be dependent on a job(s), not a business.

Is the OP's dream crap or stupid? No I don't think so, but from my experience that is something that takes 20-40 years to put in place.
LMAO at this one. No truth has been better written.

I remember a Chris Titus routine from a few years ago...he said (paraphrasing) that when a Mom sees a kid headed for the outlet with a hairpin, she stops him, takes the hairpin away, and that process has to be repeated who knows how many times before junior outgrows the urge.

But Dad doesn't take the hairpin away...instead he motions to his wife..."psssssst...HEY, WATCH THIS..." zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzAP!! "Hey little man, that HURT, din't it? Not gonna do THAT again, are ya??!!"

Soooo...in that light...yeah, go ahead and move here. (pssssst...HEY, WATCH THIS!!)
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2010, 11:55 PM
 
857 posts, read 1,346,168 times
Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
I'm curious as to whether you are an American or have you lived in the U.S.? Rich trust fund babies don't make meth. Why would they need to do this? If they wanna consume drugs they just buy them. And they're not going to buy a junky drug like meth which is a drug for the "low class" people . . .
If you have a kind of hippy/alternative mentality, then you may enjoy Santa Fe. But you'd also need to be comfortable living and working around the Hispanic culture, because probably 60% of the city is Hispanic, and they dominate the politics down there. . .
Perhaps Flagstaff, Arizona is an exception to this, as it has a very significant meth problem, even amongst Doctors, lawyers, and other professionals.

What you say about meth being a lower class drug is true everywhere else I have lived (in the US).

I have lived in both Santa Fe and Albuquerque, and the "locals" (both Hispanics and Caucasian) are not open to newcomers, and prefer to hire other local people.

It's the same way, in terms of "locals," in Flagstaff, AZ.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top