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Old 02-01-2011, 12:32 AM
Ode
 
298 posts, read 669,451 times
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Self-taught mainly, along with watching my grandma and asking her millions of questions. As a very young girl, I started with the simple things and branched out. I made my own sandwiches, starting with PBJ. Then grilled cheese, and egg salad and lunchmeat types. I would make my parents coffee and breakfast in bed on the weekends. Usually toast, eggs, and sausage or bacon. My grandma taught me how to make sourdough pancakes, my little sisters gobbled those up!

By the time I was 8-9 I could make several tasty meals, even with the limited number of dishes I knew how to make. I remember making tamale pie once back then, I knew how to make it because we usually had it at least once a week and I would watch every time. As I got older I just tried new things. Sometimes there were tremendously bad failures, but usually whatever I made was edible. I've always loved cooking, so I guess that was my incentive to improve on my skills. I am a pretty good cook now.
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:38 AM
 
Location: Colorado
554 posts, read 1,305,418 times
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I'm another latch key kid. Starting at age 9, I was home alone all the time until I got married and left my parents house. I had to learn how to cook from boxes, cans and packages. I could read a recipe, add water, milk and butter to survive.

I remember my friends parents invited me over for dinner A LOT. So I bonded with their families and learned how to appreciate different cultures, traditions and flavors. Because of those kind people, I love Greek, Italian, Indian, Oriental and Mexican food more than the traditional Americanized cuisine. I had an excellent mix of good friends.

To this very day, my parents think I have strange food tastes (and don't realize how that came to be) because I don't like meat, potatoes and corn for every meal. So I guess I'm still learning how to cook with recipes from scratch. At least my son likes my cooking and that's all that matters.
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,462 posts, read 8,202,148 times
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I'm still learning
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Old 03-31-2011, 12:38 PM
 
239 posts, read 422,045 times
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learned from my momma. i went away to college for 4 years - the 1st year was easy living in the dorms & we had the dining hall w/ a meal plan. my 2nd year i was in an apartment...had to learn. would call my mom all of the time "how did you make that?" and she'd walk me thru it step by step. now i cook all of the time and am always turning to google for new recipies and betty crocker of course.
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Old 06-28-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 4,592,120 times
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Default Wanting to learn to become a better cook

I figured seeing that I am in my early 20's, I should learn how to be everyday cook, one who would like to first learn the basic recipes and such. Can you guys recommend any good websites and books that I can look into? Thanks
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Old 06-28-2011, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,427,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
I figured seeing that I am in my early 20's, I should learn how to be everyday cook, one who would like to first learn the basic recipes and such. Can you guys recommend any good websites and books that I can look into? Thanks
You are starting at a great time. I hope you have people you can use to experiment on. There are lots of websites and some great begining books. Of course the standby book will always be: Betty Crocker picture cookbook and the Recipe Hall of fame cook book. Both have lots of good, basic information. For websites: just google: learning to cook or cooking for beginners. You will find a wealth of information. Good luck and happy cooking.

NIta
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Old 06-28-2011, 04:09 PM
 
2,065 posts, read 4,035,222 times
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Congratulations from someone who loves to cook!!!!

Could you write about what your favorite foods/ingredients are?
I guess if you start by cooking what you like to eat, you can make great progress from there.
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Old 06-28-2011, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,356 posts, read 3,528,493 times
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Good for you! Since we must eat, make it interesting and fun and healthy. As said by previous poster, there are many books & websites to try out. One of my favorites, that can tell you how to boil water & on up to creme brulee etc. is:

allrecipes.com

Tips on ingredients, kitchen tools, basic up to difficult recipes, specialty recipes ie from India and question threads where you can ask questions and get recipe recommendations.

My mom did not cook at all unless you call buying cans of veggies, opening, and heating/serving. So, no experience necessary. I taught myself with books and a LOT of practice. It is fun and enjoyable and relaxing to me.

Hope you find so too.
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Old 06-28-2011, 05:19 PM
 
1,891 posts, read 2,178,535 times
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Another great book is called Joy of Cooking. I hear newer editions aren't great compared to the older ones (I only have one copy, a '64 edition).

Start watching Food and Cook channels. PBS also has some great cooking shows.

If you come upon a technique or "chef code" word, simply google it and you will find answers on the first 5 results or so.
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Old 06-28-2011, 05:35 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,531 posts, read 42,694,765 times
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Being a good basic cook is so easy, that if you want to be you will be. A good cook can read a recipe, has a good couple of knives, a few good pans and is eager to try. No big secret. Teach yourself to make an egg over easy, a steak that is brown on the outside and rare on the inside, a grilled piece of fish, a superb Caesar salad, a killer pasta sauce, and you can fake the rest.
Go to a few area cooking classes...most cities have them. Also, watch the Food Channel and duplicate some of those recipes.
All of us old school Moms have been cooking good stuff for about 100 years and it's not that hard if you have a passion for it.
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