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Old 02-15-2013, 05:09 PM
 
Location: 406
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The top five most reported ancestries in the U.S. in 2010 were: German (about 48,000,000), Irish (about 35,000,000), Mexican(about 33,000,000), English (about 26,000,000) and American (about 20,000,000). It would appear that German, Irish and Mexican ancestry are more prevalent than English ancestry.

Personally, I can claim German, Irish and English anecestry out of the aforementioned selection, but I generally prefer to answer "American."

Thus, I'll never understand this bizarre fixation that so many Americans have on the national/cultural origins of their (usually) deceased ancestors and its relevance to them in the 21st century.
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Old 02-15-2013, 06:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montguy View Post
The top five most reported ancestries in the U.S. in 2010 were: German (about 48,000,000), Irish (about 35,000,000), Mexican(about 33,000,000), English (about 26,000,000) and American (about 20,000,000). It would appear that German, Irish and Mexican ancestry are more prevalent than English ancestry.
I'm not convinced. I've met many G/I/E mixes on trips to New York/Philadelphia - I just think it's far more fashionable to call yourself German or Irish in the Northern states.
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Old 02-16-2013, 03:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ArsenalFC View Post
I'm not convinced. I've met many G/I/E mixes on trips to New York/Philadelphia - I just think it's far more fashionable to call yourself German or Irish in the Northern states.
That's because Germans and Irish are more recent immigrants than English. Like someone said it's easier and normal to identify oneself to a recent ancestor. Germans and Irish outnumber English in the Midwest and Northeast, I can believe that but I doubt about the South, West and some New England states.

About English Americans, I think the only place they haven't been dominant is the Upper Midwest, states like Minnesota or North Dakota. Even in the 1980 US census, they are the fourth largest ancestry behind Germans, Scandinavians and Irish but otherwise they are throughout the country.
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montguy View Post
The top five most reported ancestries in the U.S. in 2010 were: German (about 48,000,000), Irish (about 35,000,000), Mexican(about 33,000,000), English (about 26,000,000) and American (about 20,000,000). It would appear that German, Irish and Mexican ancestry are more prevalent than English ancestry.

Personally, I can claim German, Irish and English anecestry out of the aforementioned selection, but I generally prefer to answer "American."

Thus, I'll never understand this bizarre fixation that so many Americans have on the national/cultural origins of their (usually) deceased ancestors and its relevance to them in the 21st century.


Mexicans shoud count as Americans. Mexico is in America.
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
German is far more reported, but I find it hard to believe it's more common than English ancestry. Do you think English ancestry is actually more common and just isn't reported as often since it's seen by many as "ordinary American" ancestry?
German ancestry is more common.

The reason German ancestry is less visible is because most German cultural institutions in the US were suppressed and/or destroyed in the anti-German hysteria that immediately preceded WWI. Prior to that, there were hundreds of German-language newspapers, German clubs and civic organizations, even German Saturday schools where students of German heritage often to learn their ancestral language and culture. That ended in the first decade of the 20th century, as German-language presses were shut down and German cultural institutions banned.
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by RogersParkGuy View Post
The reason German ancestry is less visible is because most German cultural institutions in the US were suppressed and/or destroyed in the anti-German hysteria that immediately preceded WWI. Prior to that, there were hundreds of German-language newspapers, German clubs and civic organizations, even German Saturday schools where students of German heritage often to learn their ancestral language and culture. That ended in the first decade of the 20th century, as German-language presses were shut down and German cultural institutions banned.
I wonder how it would be if all these German cultural institutions weren't suppressed. German would be the official language in Wisconsin, Nebraska or the entire Midwest.
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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The Scots-Irish as indigenous people : Gene Expression

I found this kind of interesting about the Scots-Irish. Some of this I already knew. It starts talking about the Scots-Irish as the "American," although it does go into other issues like race and Affirmative Action. If the politics aren't your thing, stick to the part where the Scots-Irish helped influence American norms.
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Old 02-19-2013, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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I'm bored, so I thought I'd trace some of the German towns along the Old National Road:


Google Maps

I added in Philadelphia (as the major port of entry) and New Philadelphia (as the town named after it). This is only a small sample, though.
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
The Scots-Irish as indigenous people : Gene Expression

I found this kind of interesting about the Scots-Irish. Some of this I already knew. It starts talking about the Scots-Irish as the "American," although it does go into other issues like race and Affirmative Action. If the politics aren't your thing, stick to the part where the Scots-Irish helped influence American norms.
That's very interesting, there is a lot of articles about the Scotch-Irish and their influence on American culture but their number is still very underrated.

Here's an article about the Scotch-Irish who settled in southern Missouri: Sons of Ulster: Scotch-Irish Descendants in 1880 Springfield, Missouri
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Old 02-20-2013, 07:40 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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There's a big thread on the Scots-Irish ancestry in the History subforum, and I deffo think this is a key ancestry group in influencing the national character of the USA.

From upthread bit, a fascinating list of of states, rank ordered by English ancestry:

The states with the highest percentage of English ancestry were
Massachusetts 82%,
Vermont 76%,
Rhode Island 71%,
Virginia including West Virginia 68.5%,
Connecticut 67%,
Maryland incl.DC 64.5%,
North Carolina 66%,
New Hampshire 61%,
South Carolina 60.2%,
Maine 60%,
Delaware 60%, K

The bottom 5 or 6 states are the usual suspects (KY and Tenn having a strong Scots/Irish mix and ..in KY...also Germans from PA), but with a suprise of Georgia. Not well known but Georgia also recieved a German immigration of Protestant refugees from Catholic parts of Germany and Austria.

Kentucky and Tennessee 57.9%,
Georgia 57.4%,
New York 52%,
New Jersey 47%,
Pennsylvania 35.3%,
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