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Old 11-26-2016, 03:04 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,425,124 times
Reputation: 11220

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
LoL that sounds awful. California winter is so much better
It depends. In the Bay Area it rains all winter long, at least when the state still had rain. Plus they get tons of snow in Eastern California every year.
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Old 11-26-2016, 10:31 AM
 
6,979 posts, read 14,105,764 times
Reputation: 4571
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
The worst part of winter is standing outside scraping the car first thing every morning, or worse if you don't drive, waiting on public transportation. Otherwise it's really not that bad, and kinda nice on your days off when you have an excuse to stay inside and drink a hot beverage all day long.
I actually like waiting for public transit. If you're in a city like NYC, Chicago, DC, Philly, Boston your bus or subway is really never that long of a wait. Definitely beats scraping a windshield and plowing a driveway.
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Old 11-26-2016, 10:33 AM
 
6,979 posts, read 14,105,764 times
Reputation: 4571
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZanZeBar View Post
Average summer highs in Houston, like the rest of the coastal SE US, are no higher than the low 90s during the hottest month. Humidity suppresses summer temps (as it is moisture in the air), so with the normal high amounts, temps don't go higher than 95F on most summer days in these cities; whenever you see triple digit temps in these cities, the air is much drier than normal, without much of the high moisture that would keep the temps down. Because of this inverse relationship with temperature vs humidity, it is practically impossible to see both 100F heat AND high humidity.
If Philly can do it, Houston can do it. Many days this summer in Philly had highs in the mid 90s with high humidity. Several days had a heat index of over 100. During the worst heat wave, Weather Underground had the South Philly location with a heat index of 128. I have the screenshot on my phone to prove it.

So yeah, if Philly can have mid 90s and near 100 with high humidity, Houston easily can. Obviously that's not every single day, but it happens much more often the further south you go.
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Old 11-26-2016, 12:21 PM
 
74 posts, read 40,752 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by soursop View Post
Minneapolis. Hands down worst weather.

Nope. Upstate NY cities are just as cold but get 2x the snow and are as cloudy as Seattle and Portland. Sorry.

Minneapolis is just bitter cold. Not nearly as much snowfall as here and much sunnier.

Get out more.
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Old 11-26-2016, 02:32 PM
 
189 posts, read 109,573 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
If Philly can do it, Houston can do it. Many days this summer in Philly had highs in the mid 90s with high humidity. Several days had a heat index of over 100. During the worst heat wave, Weather Underground had the South Philly location with a heat index of 128. I have the screenshot on my phone to prove it.

So yeah, if Philly can have mid 90s and near 100 with high humidity, Houston easily can. Obviously that's not every single day, but it happens much more often the further south you go.
It doesn't work that way; you are interpreting the data wrongly.

The humidity %s you see on weather channels and such is the relative humidity; that value decreases the warmer the temperature is (since warmer air can hold more moisture).

Weather Underground often uses amateur, unofficial weather stations for their data; therefore, many of these stations don't eliminate confounding variables as efficiently as official stations (or at all). For example, they will have their thermometers on hot metal surfaces, which traps heat more than air does.
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Old 11-26-2016, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,441 posts, read 8,156,563 times
Reputation: 4488
Yeah, Upstate NY sounds tragic
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Old 11-26-2016, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,393,652 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
Yeah, Upstate NY sounds tragic
This is Pittsburgh, but would probably scare anyone unfamiliar with Winter.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6249iHSJsKo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWMLjJk1BWg

Spokane, WA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wp2sqrfGSPI
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Old 11-26-2016, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,441 posts, read 8,156,563 times
Reputation: 4488
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
This is Pittsburgh, but would probably scare anyone unfamiliar with Winter.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6249iHSJsKo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWMLjJk1BWg
I've always imagined Pittsburgh to be a nightmare. Literally who thought building a city in that location with that climate was a good idea
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Houston seems too hot and Minneapolis seems too cold. Phoenix is obviously the hottest, but that dry heat is much different than humid heat. Same way the 52 degrees I felt Saturday with wind was much more brutal than the 52 degrees with no wind I felt yesterday.

I've always wondered, how did Minneapolis-Saint Paul get so big with such brutal temps? How on Earth do people tolerate this? Lol.
See Moscow (population 16 Million)
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Old 11-27-2016, 12:17 AM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,571 posts, read 2,588,087 times
Reputation: 2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
It depends. In the Bay Area it rains all winter long, at least when the state still had rain. Plus they get tons of snow in Eastern California every year.
No it doesn't. I think you have the bay confused with Seattle.
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Old 11-27-2016, 03:44 AM
 
Location: Palmer/Fishhook, Alaska
1,256 posts, read 931,670 times
Reputation: 1895
Any place hot and sunny most of the time. The south and southwest are unbearable for me.

Thank god I'm in Alaska lol
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