U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:27 PM
 
21,188 posts, read 30,359,201 times
Reputation: 19627

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
In the context of "cool"/"uncool" cities, we're talking about educated young professionals for the most part and they can fall in either the Millennial or Gen X category (the youngest of Gen X). Jacksonville is not attracting large numbers of this group; most domestic migrants to metro Jacksonville are families and retirees. The topic here is "uncool" cities, not sustainable growth cities.
But who sets the "cool factor"? There's a large population of people in their 30s and 40s on up to 50 (20% of the population) who have their own definition of "cool" that doesn't involve bearded clones swilling craft beer, sporting t-shirts with ironic quotes or working in the IT industry. To put it into perspective it's sort of ridiculous that a demographic that consists of 20% of the overall population (ages 21-34) dictates "coolness", and feel certain cities that continue to thrive and evolve that are not overrun with Millennials aren't losing any sleep over it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:34 PM
 
122 posts, read 78,436 times
Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Its the single least diverse major metro area in the US. There is some evidence for it.
Diversity does not equal "cool" or "uncool" no matter what you believe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Its the single least diverse major metro area in the US. There is some evidence for it.
So is Jersey City, NJ one of the absolute coolest places in the country?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:39 PM
 
2,508 posts, read 2,269,683 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
But who sets the "cool factor"? There's a large population of people in their 30s and 40s on up to 50 (20% of the population) who have their own definition of "cool" that doesn't involve bearded clones swilling craft beer, sporting t-shirts with ironic quotes or working in the IT industry. To put it into perspective it's sort of ridiculous that a demographic that consists of 20% of the overall population (ages 21-34) dictates "coolness", and feel certain cities that continue to thrive and evolve that are not overrun with Millennials aren't losing any sleep over it.
The premise of the thread is on cool cities based on the millineal population. Why are people bent out of shape.... some cities just aren't cool but rather manageable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:40 PM
 
7,703 posts, read 4,562,015 times
Reputation: 8417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
Its the single least diverse major metro area in the US. There is some evidence for it.
Imagine putting even the slightest bit of thought into this. During its heyday, Pittsburgh was one of the major destinations of the great migration. It drew enough of a black population to have not one but two Negro League baseball teams. Unfortunately, the city experienced major, MAJOR economic decline from the 70s-90s. That just happens to be the period when America saw exponential Latino population growth. There were simply no reason for Latinos to come to Pittsburgh because it was dying and had no jobs. Again, it's the jobs.
For what it's worth, it's not difficult to have ethnic diversity in a former slave state that borders Mexico.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:46 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,236,441 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLawMan View Post
Diversity does not equal "cool" or "uncool" no matter what you believe.
This is true. However, it can leave an interesting footprint on a city. It just depends....
Others don't agree with my assessment, but guess what .. "coolness" is subjective. Who would've thought that?

For Pittsburgh, I disagree it's the Millennials. It's the city's features and history that are "cool" IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:47 PM
 
Location: USA
17,709 posts, read 8,854,347 times
Reputation: 13236
I'd think most of the old rust belt industrial centers that have not had a renaissance. Buffalo, Rochester, Detroit, Milwaukee, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,192,209 times
Reputation: 10280
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Imagine putting even the slightest bit of thought into this. During its heyday, Pittsburgh was one of the major destinations of the great migration. It drew enough of a black population to have not one but two Negro League baseball teams. Unfortunately, the city experienced major, MAJOR economic decline from the 70s-90s. That just happens to be the period when America saw exponential Latino population growth. There were simply no reason for Latinos to come to Pittsburgh because it was dying and had no jobs. Again, it's the jobs.
For what it's worth, it's not difficult to have ethnic diversity in a former slave state that borders Mexico.
How do you explain the ethnic diversity in the Detroit area then? They also had a huge decline from the 60s to the last part of last decade but they never stopped getting immigrants from the Middle East and Asia.

Diversity is way more than Hispanics and African Americans. Houston and Dallas have massive Asian and African born populations as well. Houston as many Asians as Seattle despite being no where near as geographically as close to Asia as Seattle is. Pittsburgh doesnt have any of that.

The bottom line is that Pittsburgh still gets very few international immigrants and its no longer a dying city. You cannot use that excuse anymore. Pittsburgh has the jobs just not the ethnic diversity.

As for the ones that say diversity doesnt equal cool. It is a factor of being cool, but not the only one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 03:42 PM
 
75 posts, read 59,302 times
Reputation: 138
Coolness is for people who are insecure and suffer from FOMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2017, 03:48 PM
 
7,703 posts, read 4,562,015 times
Reputation: 8417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboys fan in Houston View Post
How do you explain the ethnic diversity in the Detroit area then? They also had a huge decline from the 60s to the last part of last decade but they never stopped getting immigrants from the Middle East and Asia.

Diversity is way more than Hispanics and African Americans. Houston and Dallas have massive Asian and African born populations as well. Houston as many Asians as Seattle despite being no where near as geographically as close to Asia as Seattle is. Pittsburgh doesnt have any of that.

The bottom line is that Pittsburgh still gets very few international immigrants and its no longer a dying city. You cannot use that excuse anymore. Pittsburgh has the jobs just not the ethnic diversity.

As for the ones that say diversity doesnt equal cool. It is a factor of being cool, but not the only one.
You're all over the place, but the only thing that remains consistent is your conflating correlation with causality. Detroit and has had a large middle-eastern population since the 30s, long before the decline. The Middle East and population continues to grow because there's already a large Middle Eastern population in place. People are joining their families. They're going to places where their culture is already represented.

Houston drew a large Vietnamese population after the war because it had a strong economy and a climate similar to that of Vietnam. I'm sorry I hurt your feelings when I said Houston wasn't cool, but it isn't. People move there for jobs. You should be proud of that. It's a good place to live.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top