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Old 10-18-2009, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,416 posts, read 54,802,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I don't know. I mean I think there are things in the US pretty much the same as a British pub, but do we call them pubs? (I mean except as an affectation. Bear in mind I don't drink alcohol)
Good question. In New York City, you refer to an Irish pub as a pub. Otherwise, it's a bar.
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Old 10-18-2009, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,416 posts, read 54,802,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I don't mean to be contrarian in every single post I make here :-)

but, ever spend any time in England or Scandinavia?


ABQConvict
I believe the prize for highest rate of alcoholism in the world goes to Iceland.
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Old 10-18-2009, 01:35 PM
 
Location: SWE
887 posts, read 1,379,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmptrwlt View Post
We got pretty much the same (excessive) drinking culture in Norway too but I think Finland is even more extreme.
Actually seems to be the more north you go, the worse it gets.
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Old 10-19-2009, 12:52 PM
 
Location: DF
758 posts, read 1,964,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
I would like to hear some interesting stories from people who grew up abroad...What shocked you the most about the US, its culture and people? Please include which country you are from and what you expected the US to be like. I love hearing these stories from people. Thank you very much.
I think the driving. Americans take for granted how friendly the majority of people drive in almost any U.S. city compared to the rest of the world. When someone honks at you here in the U.S.... it's considered rude and unacceptable... in many parts of the world, blaring your horn and running people off the road is considered the norm
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Old 10-19-2009, 02:19 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 23,011,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joelaldo View Post
I think the driving. Americans take for granted how friendly the majority of people drive in almost any U.S. city compared to the rest of the world. When someone honks at you here in the U.S.... it's considered rude and unacceptable... in many parts of the world, blaring your horn and running people off the road is considered the norm
This is part of what scares me off from traveling overseas. I'd like to, but any kind of car-crash can be much more serious for me as I have a brittle-bone condition. If people in other nations routinely run people off the road I'm not sure I'd survive.

Is it like that in Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand too? (Granted Canada isn't overseas)
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Old 10-19-2009, 03:26 PM
 
2,816 posts, read 5,399,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
This is part of what scares me off from traveling overseas. I'd like to, but any kind of car-crash can be much more serious for me as I have a brittle-bone condition. If people in other nations routinely run people off the road I'm not sure I'd survive.

Is it like that in Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand too? (Granted Canada isn't overseas)
You'll be alright. It's not Ben Hur. I've never been run out of the road in my life or even seen aynone do it.
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Old 10-19-2009, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,899 posts, read 7,675,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
This is part of what scares me off from traveling overseas. I'd like to, but any kind of car-crash can be much more serious for me...
Why not just take the bus and/or trains? I've never had a driver's license, and it was so liberating to go anywhere I wanted.

I zigzag-ed all over Europe for 2 weeks after my classes were over in Florence. I had some form of Europass, so I could ride the trains as much as I wanted for those 2 weeks. I would take long, overnight train rides on purpose to save $$ on hotel rooms. One of my fondest memories was sitting in the middle of the concours of Paris' north train station (Gare du Nord, I think?) with my friend, trying to decide where we wanted to go next. (We decided to go to Copenhagen.)

Sorry for rambling on. I tend to get nostalgic about my European trip.
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Old 10-19-2009, 09:33 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 23,011,792 times
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That'd be fine so long as they're handicapped accessible. (Some brittle-bone "OI" people can walk, but I can't)

It's largely something of a pipe dream. I've almost never gone more than a few hundred from home and likely couldn't afford Europe.
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:22 AM
 
7,022 posts, read 6,007,704 times
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I'm always surprised when Europeans act surprised by how different the US culture is from their own country's culture, as if the US as a whole were merely an extension of Europe. In fact, they are so taken aback that they feel it necessary to make derogatory comments about America TO Americans; their need to smugly acknowledge their superiority over the supposedly "greatest country in the world" to too much for them to resist.

I can't imagine an American being so rude, ignorant, and classless as to visit a country and then proclaim to its inhabitants what's wrong with it. I guess we are taught better manners than that.
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Old 10-20-2009, 12:15 PM
 
Location: West Paris
10,264 posts, read 10,344,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by renault View Post
I'm always surprised when Europeans act surprised by how different the US culture is from their own country's culture, as if the US as a whole were merely an extension of Europe. In fact, they are so taken aback that they feel it necessary to make derogatory comments about America TO Americans; their need to smugly acknowledge their superiority over the supposedly "greatest country in the world" to too much for them to resist.

I can't imagine an American being so rude, ignorant, and classless as to visit a country and then proclaim to its inhabitants what's wrong with it. I guess we are taught better manners than that.

Can you give any examples ? I'm astonished.
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