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Old 06-28-2008, 06:17 PM
 
169 posts, read 372,938 times
Reputation: 66

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Big deal? Its not a big deal that everywhere in the city is considerably more expensive than ever before at a time when the incomes for many are stagnating in relation to inflation? Its one thing when people don't want to live somewhere and decide to move out. But its another thing if people are being forced out because they are poor.

What needs to happen is the city open up some parts for more develoment. Long Island could easily mitigate the oil prices by zoning higher density around the LIRR, thus allowing more people to live in proximity to public transit and at least for work and basic shopping, not need to drive their cars (which they don't necessarily have to give up). And plus with the LIRR access to Grand Central (very wise idea) this is going to be even more convienent. Yes, there are lots of nice apartments in the bx no doubt, but if you can afford it, newcomers should make new dwellings, and contrary to public opion, there are areas in the city this can happen but aren't developed yet due to bad proximity to transportation.
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Old 06-29-2008, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,742,612 times
Reputation: 10455
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyJerzyKidUNO View Post
Just looking for opinions. Does anyone think that BX will become all white and gentrified like the rest of NYC in the near future?
The rest of New York City is all white and gentrified? Hmm...that might be a tiny little exaggeration, don't you think?
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Old 06-30-2008, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Mott Haven
2,978 posts, read 3,112,083 times
Reputation: 209
Agreed Fred..many people only know the city over the past 20 years, where many areas have remained in a time warp due to crime, drugs, extreme poverty and segregation. The city historically, however, has always been in flux, with neighborhoods changing, and that natural ebb and flow was artificially halted and it created much of the problems we see today.

However, that is changing now and neighborhoods across the city are finally getting back into their groove and opening up again..new people coming in and different locals moving out..and that is really a good thing.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Morrisania, Bronx
731 posts, read 1,790,834 times
Reputation: 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
West Bronx getting some play lately:

Morris Heights gets affordable co-ops


Ground was broken on a new affordable co-op in Morris Heights. Though news of new affordable housing is often greeted with cheers, some people in this neighborhood are skeptical.

Washington Bridge View, located at 150 Featherbed Lane, will be an 83,145 square foot mixed-use development that will house 48 residential units: 10 one-bedroom and 38 two-bedroom apartments that will be sold through a lottery.

More here:

http://www.bronxbeat.org/cs/ContentServer?childpagename=Bronxbeat08%2FJRN_Cont ent_C%2FRW1StoryDetailLayout2&c=JRN_Content_C&p=11 75373852248&pagename=JRN%2FRW1Wrapper&cid=11753746 31350&site=Bronxbeat08 (broken link)


I knew about this before it was published. As a regular in the area I saw the sign WASHINGTON BRIDGE VIEW.

Good luck in promoting it. That area, Morris Heights, is an extremely poor area where 52% of the population rely on public assistance. If you read the article people really doubt anybody in the neighborhood can afford it. There used to be a building there but it burned down. The sorrounding buildings on University, Andrews, Harrison are all boarded up. Across the street are the behemoth projects known as the Sedegwick houses. To make things better the 46th precinct covering the area (as well as University Heights, Tremont and Fordham) lead the city in murders with 8. According to another article Morris Heights brother neighborhood University Heights has expirienced a population loss. I wouldn't be surprised if some of the losses occured in Morris Heights because Morris Heights is commonly grouped with University Heights.

The west Bronx has become undesirable. The flourishing drug trade, widespread poverty and prominence of gangs have all contributed to a sky rocketing crime rate that has really destroyed the west Bronx.
Also, it is tough to get to the 4 train from Morris Heights as the Bx18 is the only option.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Morrisania, Bronx
731 posts, read 1,790,834 times
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I think the Bronx would get more stable in a few years. Mott Haven and Concourse Village are very stable since there are many residents who have lived there since the 50s and 60s.

More and more Puerto Ricans are moving to the Southeastern Bronx (like Morris Park, Throggs Neck, Pelham Bay, and Westchester Square) while their parents remain in more western neighborhoods.

Meanwhile, Dominicans are choosing the Bronx as their escape hatch from the Upper Manhattan gentrification. Most choose to live west of Webster Avenue since they can be close to their families in the Heights. Also, Dominicans who have lived in the Bronx since the 80s are moving east of Webster to areas like Longwood, East Tremont, East Morrisania, and Van Nest.
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Morrisania, Bronx
731 posts, read 1,790,834 times
Reputation: 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guywithacause View Post
Well with some of us with a little longer memory, the "middle class" has been fleeing for the past 40 years quite honestly. This is not something new or unique, the city has been losing this class since the 50s, and there was a huge upheavel in the 70s where the city lost hundreds of thousands of middle class people in just a few years. And yet...the city survived and today it is flourishing.

What is the moral of the story? Don't believe all the hype! Nobody knows where the Bronx will be in 10 years..so forget about forecasting 50. Who knew in the 50s that 10 years later there would be virtually no white people left in the south Bronx? None. Who knew 10 years after that that the south bronx would be a warzone, burnt, and abandoned? None.

Point is...right now the Bronx is being pulled in many different directions. There is a repositioning of the borough as a working/middle class enclave (especially the South Bronx), however there are also luxury developments entering the market, market rate 3 family homes for $650,000, affordable housing, a fair emount of empty lots that can be turned developed into anything, as well as the inevitable transformation of the housing projects into something else besides the exclusive domain of the destitute.

In 2-3 years from now, however, we can say that the Yankee Stadium redevelopment zone will be complete, bringing with it a completely transformed area, with a new waterfront park, bike trails, housing, major retail and restaurants, and a new Metro-North Station. In addition, we know that just east of Yankee stadium, in Melrose, there will be a new University, as well as a large development of "green" affordable housing and market rate housing, including significant green space, parks, and plaza, and with that will be more retail, restaurants, and amenities to serve this new working/middle class population.

Further east towards Hunts Point, we also know that more parks along the Bronx RIver parkway will be online, and the greenway will be enlarged. There will likely be the completion of the Bank Note building in Hunts Point, with new artist space, gourmet food market, and community areas. And of course, the greening of the Bronx is leading the city, with trees and greenspace being created largely in the South Bronx..easily twice as green as it is today.
This may result in more overcrowding on Bronx buses and trains, especially the Bx6 (which is already overcrowded between Yankee Stadium and Southern Boulevard-163rd Street).
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,503 posts, read 17,215,747 times
Reputation: 2043
Quote:
Originally Posted by cotb16 View Post
Also, it is tough to get to the 4 train from Morris Heights as the Bx18 is the only option.
Not really....you can walk to the 176th street station.
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,503 posts, read 17,215,747 times
Reputation: 2043
Quote:
Originally Posted by cotb16 View Post
I think the Bronx would get more stable in a few years. Mott Haven and Concourse Village are very stable since there are many residents who have lived there since the 50s and 60s.

More and more Puerto Ricans are moving to the Southeastern Bronx (like Morris Park, Throggs Neck, Pelham Bay, and Westchester Square) while their parents remain in more western neighborhoods.

Meanwhile, Dominicans are choosing the Bronx as their escape hatch from the Upper Manhattan gentrification. Most choose to live west of Webster Avenue since they can be close to their families in the Heights. Also, Dominicans who have lived in the Bronx since the 80s are moving east of Webster to areas like Longwood, East Tremont, East Morrisania, and Van Nest.
Most Dominicans are located west of Jerome. Below Fordham rd on the west side...they are the majority but share the neighborhoods with the Puerto Ricans and Blacks. Once you get into Kingsbridge Heights/Bedford Park they are the large majority.

Also have numbers in Norwood, Kingsbridge, Fordham, Soundview and Parkchester.
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,057 posts, read 29,742,612 times
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Who knows what might happen? The grandchildren of the Jews and Irish who moved out of The Bronx in the 1960s and 70s might start coming back!
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Old 07-01-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Mott Haven
2,978 posts, read 3,112,083 times
Reputation: 209
WOW what a statement Fred! Rep points for that one...that certianly would not be out of the question....as we all know..far more unlikely things have happened in the Bronx than that. Honestly..that is not that far fetched...if I were one of them I would come back to "reclaim my neighborhood." Lol...stranger things have happend in this borough..and the way things are changing so quickly right now..who knows what the heck is gonna happen!
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