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Old 10-15-2011, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
Like I suggested in the IP, people who want to argue the politics of subsidized housing can find a number of active threads in the Politics Forum where they can knock themselves out. The intention of this thread was to provide a venue for the sharing of information among folks who are exploring the practical details of obtaining subsidized housing as part of their retirement strategy.
And a valid one it is.
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Old 10-15-2011, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by SelflessGene View Post
By the way, if anyone is wondering why I'm still writing and not packing to leave for Detroit it's because I've run into a possible complication which may be of interest to others attempting to secure subsidized housing in another state.

The project manager I was speaking with failed to inform me at the start that the photo id required for application needs to be a Michigan driver's license and my Florida license won't do. (This only came out when I spoke to her supervisor later on.) This, of course, is crazy since I can't get a Michigan license without a Michigan address and I can't apply for a Michigan address until I have a Michigan license. This does not seem to be a state-mandated residency issue since other Detroit facilities have told me they would accept my Florida license for the photo id. I think it's just a matter of arbitrary weirdness. The supervisor said she'd check into the matter and call me back but she never did so it may be the've blown me off.

So the search goes on.
What happens if you don't have a license because you don't drive?? They must accept some other form of photo ID. I would ask.
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Old 10-15-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,501 posts, read 62,182,463 times
Reputation: 32182
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
What happens if you don't have a license because you don't drive?? They must accept some other form of photo ID. I would ask.

The issue isn't (likely to be) the ID itself.
The issue is far more likely to be status as a resident of the state...
which is as likely to be helping with the subsidy as the Feds are.
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Old 10-15-2011, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
The issue isn't (likely to be) the ID itself.
The issue is far more likely to be status as a resident of the state...
which is as likely to be helping with the subsidy as the Feds are.
You do not have to be a current resident of the state in which you are applying for subsidized housing. I read that in my research in response to this thread. That does not mean of course that state residents are not given priority, but state residency in a number of senior housing complexes does not appear to be a priority factor. The main factor, according to online literature, is date of application....first come, first served.
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Old 10-15-2011, 05:47 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
As for Gram and Gramps in senor subsidized housing, you cannot assume they did not work their butts off all their lives, nor can you assume that they did not own their own home part or most of their lives. They may even have significant assets when they go into subs. housing. From what I read, only income from assets (not the value of those assests) on top of SS and pensions are counted for eligibility. Even if all sources of income are higher (within defined ceiling), they can still qualify and will pay 30% of whatever they bring in. In fact, there are some senior housing that has, within their complexes, subsidized units alongside other buildings/units or fair-market rent. All this does is offer a nice place for people who have the option to pay less if they qualify.
Nor would i m,ake am supposition on either count, NEG. At issue in some communities is not subsidized senior housing which I think most view as necessary and appropriate. After all, there but for the grace of God... It's the mixed use, open housing that can drag a community down because as you pointed out, it often leads to disrepair and blight. It can also have a deleterious affect on the availability of senior housing or make such housing unpleasant for its residents if not downright scary. That's the concern I was addressing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
What happens if you don't have a license because you don't drive?? They must accept some other form of photo ID. I would ask.
I believe most states issue identification card that are just that and serve as official ID.
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Old 10-15-2011, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Nor would i m,ake am supposition on either count, NEG. At issue in some communities is not subsidized senior housing which I think most view as necessary and appropriate. After all, there but for the grace of God... It's the mixed use, open housing that can drag a community down because as you pointed out, it often leads to disrepair and blight. It can also have a deleterious affect on the availability of senior housing or make such housing unpleasant for its residents if not downright scary. That's the concern I was addressing.
I hear you. The family housing (as opposed to senior housing) is indeed a problem, and not all residents of family housing cause the problems. If this kind of housing isn't available for families though, you would see massive homelessness and civil unrest on the order of which we have never experienced before. No one wants this kind of housing in their community (in my town, there are lawn signs all over town protesting just such housing), understandably...but it has to go somewhere. This is a sociological, societal dilemma, just like dealing with those slipping down in the economy and those entering and exiting the criminal justice system. IMO, instead of wars we could be directing our efforts and money to these issues, but that is another subject for the politics forum.

On topic, there appears to be more senior subsidized housing than many of us realized.
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Old 10-15-2011, 06:03 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,839 posts, read 18,861,423 times
Reputation: 33746
Quite frankly, I believe people should have the "freedom" to live in the type of neighborhood they prefer in the midst of similarly situated others and government has no place telling them what kind of neighbors they can or must have. It has less to do with "snootiness" than it does prefered lifestyle and comfort level among your social, intellectual, educational and financial peers.

Curmudgeon, I do agree with you there but I, who am down on my luck through no fault of my own, (I have my masters degree, I worked, I owned a nicehome, I saved and am frugal) would also like to live among mypeers.They aren't my financial peers anymore but they are in most other ways.Not all low income seniors fall into your stereotype.Anyway, I was gone today---I went to see some subsidized apartments that I found on one of the links in this thread and --wow! Most subsidized apts for elderly that I've seen are either really old and run down or they are highrises but these were perfectly gorgeous and newish. I'm going to call Monday and get on the waiting list. I'd have to give up living in my favorite area but living in a falling apart building that the workmen say is just too old to repair, on grounds that are not kept up gets depressing. When I owned my own home it was always well kept, not like this. I hate coming home to this place, just to look at it is depressing. So this thread has been a HUGE help to me. Now I'll be on FOUR waiting lists and I hope to find a decent place to call home.The place I found today has pleasant grounds where a person would enjoy getting out and walking and they allow you to plant flowers which makes it more homey. All subsidized places have their disadvantages--such as NO storage, not allowed a washing machine, not even in the building, small rooms, impossible kitchens, but you pick and choose and take the place that is most acceptable to you. High on my list is also good, educated, interesting people--and I met some at this new place today!
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Old 10-15-2011, 06:04 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
On topic, there appears to be more senior subsidized housing than many of us realized.
There's tons of it. In fact, any state or regional Area Area on Aging should be able to provide anyone interested with a complete list. I's not difficult to find at all.
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Old 10-15-2011, 06:14 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Curmudgeon, I do agree with you there but I, who am down on my luck through no fault of my own, (I have my masters degree, I worked, I owned a nicehome, I saved and am frugal) would also like to live among mypeers.They aren't my financial peers anymore but they are in most other ways.Not all low income seniors fall into your stereotype.Anyway, I was gone today---I went to see some subsidized apartments that I found on one of the links in this thread and --wow! Most subsidized apts for elderly that I've seen are either really old and run down or they are highrises but these were perfectly gorgeous and newish. I'm going to call Monday and get on the waiting list. I'd have to give up living in my favorite area but living in a falling apart building that the workmen say is just too old to repair, on grounds that are not kept up gets depressing. When I owned my own home it was always well kept, not like this. I hate coming home to this place, just to look at it is depressing. So this thread has been a HUGE help to me. Now I'll be on FOUR waiting lists and I hope to find a decent place to call home.The place I found today has pleasant grounds where a person would enjoy getting out and walking and they allow you to plant flowers which makes it more homey. All subsidized places have their disadvantages--such as NO storage, not allowed a washing machine, not even in the building, small rooms, impossible kitchens, but you pick and choose and take the place that is most acceptable to you. High on my list is also good, educated, interesting people--and I met some at this new place today!
Most unfortunately, in this day-and-age you're one of all too many who are the victims of circumstances that were far beyond their control. A lousy economy, a failed stock market, corporate greed that eliminated most defined benefit pensions, the hellish increases in health care costs and the loss of any benefits for many, higher prices for food, gas and most commodities; it's all taken its toll. Added to the mix is the uncomfortable fact that this country doesn't really have a sterling record of taking care of its seniors; beginning with families.

I hope you find the perfect spot, and soon, and it's everything you want.
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Old 10-15-2011, 06:15 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,127 posts, read 17,145,055 times
Reputation: 9980
OT: (Sort of). My 80yo aunt lived in subsidized Senior Apts. Her rent was ~$17/month (late 1980- mid 1990's) went up and down a dollar or two a year. The socal worker in her complex called me one day to tell me my aunt could not pay her rent, My aunt said she was out of money. I know she had enought money from her SS check, to pay her rent. Told SW i would look into it. That night went over to her apt. and found out my aunt had run out of checks in her check book. She had cash to pay rent, but that was "her" money. I don't think she ever understood checking acounts was her money also, . Got new book of check out of her closet, and she was then able to pay the rent.
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