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Old 03-15-2016, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,938,980 times
Reputation: 6716

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BTW - Florida is a closed primary state (with some very limited exceptions). I have read reports today of Florida voters complaining that Trump wasn't on the ballot. This is probably because these people are registered Democrats - who can only vote for the Democratic candidates. They probably registered to vote 30+ years ago as "yellow dog" Democrats and forgot about their party registrations. I doubt most of these people have voted in a primary election before - and understand how things work.

OTOH - there have also been reports of Florida precincts running out of ballots - especially on the Republican side. Which is inexcusable IMO. It's good to see that people are engaged in this election. Whether or not they're supporting candidates I like.

I am curious. How do things work in an open primary state like Ohio? Do you just ask for a ballot from one party - or the other? Even though you're not registered in any particular party? Or are all the candidates from both parties listed on one ballot? Can independents vote in an open primary state?

Although there are lots of things not to like about California - I think it has a neat primary system (at the state level). Best I understand it (I could be wrong) - everyone from every party runs on a single primary ballot. And the top 2 vote-getters in the primary face off in the general election. Really encourages candidates to move to the middle. Which is where most voters are IMO. Robyn

 
Old 03-15-2016, 04:32 PM
 
6,276 posts, read 4,740,348 times
Reputation: 12884
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
......

And - of course - seniors are interested in issues other than Medicare and SS. Depending on their circumstances. For example - as people live longer - and many work longer - good jobs are important. So a candidate who has better job plans than another candidate may well be attractive.

.....
I am retired so jobs mean little to me personally. Of course, we need to see a healthy economy overall and I want to see my kids and eventually my grandkids succeed in the workplace.


There are other issues that are more important to me. In addition to social security and Medicare, I am concerned about inflation. I hate it when I hear we need a greater rate of inflation. Why? Of course I am concerned because those of us on fixed or partially fixed incomes are not going to do well with inflation. I am concerned about my investments. I need them to grow to continue to provide part of my income for the next 20 or 30 years. Again, a healthy economy is going to be a big factor. I am interested in local services such as senior centers and senior services and lower property taxes for seniors.


Why I am not sure, but I am also concerned about the future of mankind after I am gone. What really concerns me is religion and nationalism and other forms of tribalism. I would like to see a lot less faith and emotion and more rational, tolerant and civilized behavior. Those ideas go way beyond current politics or do they? We seem to be moving towards the next holy wars. We cannot seem to get beyond those in our country who want everyone else to follow their beliefs.
 
Old 03-15-2016, 05:17 PM
 
1,190 posts, read 665,070 times
Reputation: 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
BTW - Florida is a closed primary state (with some very limited exceptions). I have read reports today of Florida voters complaining that Trump wasn't on the ballot. This is probably because these people are registered Democrats - who can only vote for the Democratic candidates. They probably registered to vote 30+ years ago as "yellow dog" Democrats and forgot about their party registrations. I doubt most of these people have voted in a primary election before - and understand how things work.

OTOH - there have also been reports of Florida precincts running out of ballots - especially on the Republican side. Which is inexcusable IMO. It's good to see that people are engaged in this election. Whether or not they're supporting candidates I like.

I am curious. How do things work in an open primary state like Ohio? Do you just ask for a ballot from one party - or the other? Even though you're not registered in any particular party? Or are all the candidates from both parties listed on one ballot? Can independents vote in an open primary state?

Although there are lots of things not to like about California - I think it has a neat primary system (at the state level). Best I understand it (I could be wrong) - everyone from every party runs on a single primary ballot. And the top 2 vote-getters in the primary face off in the general election. Really encourages candidates to move to the middle. Which is where most voters are IMO. Robyn
I can answer your question for North Carolina. Everyone must first show legal ID (new law which has caused much discussion).

Then, even if you are registered as Unaffliliated, you are asked which party ballot you want. You are then handed the requested ballot which only lists candidates from that one party.

Hope that helps.
 
Old 03-15-2016, 05:36 PM
 
8,088 posts, read 4,423,234 times
Reputation: 3074
Dang! You pay that much in property tax? Ours in $500, for a 3/2.5, .5ac, in a very prosperous, lovely and diverse suburb N or Atl suburb. Oh and we have community theatre, broadway touring companies and opra (hehe) not far away.

But, you win, because you can go up to Mud Island any old time you want.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I can tell you that my medical costs don't even approach yours! As I said, my supplement is 1800/year and I have never paid anything out of pocket beyond that. Had 2 operations - gall bladder and hernia - and insurance paid it all.

Your property taxes are one of the reasons I live here. We pay $900/year on our modest 3-2-2.

A lot of your post was fairly condescending........
But we're used to all that. Living in a high cost area seems to have that effect on some people.
 
Old 03-15-2016, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,220,203 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
< snip>

I am curious. How do things work in an open primary state like Ohio? Do you just ask for a ballot from one party - or the other? Even though you're not registered in any particular party? Or are all the candidates from both parties listed on one ballot? Can independents vote in an open primary state?

Although there are lots of things not to like about California - I think it has a neat primary system (at the state level). Best I understand it (I could be wrong) - everyone from every party runs on a single primary ballot. And the top 2 vote-getters in the primary face off in the general election. Really encourages candidates to move to the middle. Which is where most voters are IMO. Robyn
Maryland is a closed primary state. More importantly, we don't get to vote until April 26th or two weeks before if we choose to vote early.

Immediately before New Hampshire's primary I seriously considered driving up there and declaring residency so I could vote in the primary. It's depressing that a lot of the candidates drop out before the rest of us have a chance to vote.
 
Old 03-15-2016, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,601 posts, read 17,589,896 times
Reputation: 27682
Quote:
Originally Posted by earthlyfather View Post
Dang! You pay that much in property tax? Ours in $500, for a 3/2.5, .5ac, in a very prosperous, lovely and diverse suburb N or Atl suburb. Oh and we have community theatre, broadway touring companies and opra (hehe) not far away.

But, you win, because you can go up to Mud Island any old time you want.
People in the rich states often have property tax bills into the five figures.
 
Old 03-15-2016, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,938,980 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by shamrock4 View Post
I can answer your question for North Carolina. Everyone must first show legal ID (new law which has caused much discussion).

Then, even if you are registered as Unaffliliated, you are asked which party ballot you want. You are then handed the requested ballot which only lists candidates from that one party.

Hope that helps.
Thanks for the information. Although that is weird to me coming from a closed primary state like Florida. So those old yellow dog Democrats in states in North Carolina can ask for a Republican ballot and vote for Trump. Just on the spot. When they show up to vote. I'll have to pay more attention to this closed/open primary stuff as the primaries take place. Robyn
 
Old 03-15-2016, 05:58 PM
 
8,088 posts, read 4,423,234 times
Reputation: 3074
Funny definition of rich. I think you meant high cost of living. Many ways to be and to live rich.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
People in the rich states often have property tax bills into the five figures.
 
Old 03-15-2016, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,541 posts, read 44,039,638 times
Reputation: 15150
My main issue is trade - which has destroyed economic underpinnings for the middle class worker - and certain professionals, as well. US Main Street is NOT better off - regardless of how the r-wing likes to spin the "overall" positive effects to the country of NAFTA, CAFTA, et al. I hear these think tank pundits on C-Span every week - and it is clear even they do not believe the garbage they spout. Just party parrots doing their job - repeat a lie often enough and some will believe it.

Hillary still won't admit NAFTA was the beginning of the end, instead walking all around the issue, blah, blah, blah.

Bears repeating, over and over and over: "that giant sucking sound" - "in the meantime, you've wrecked the country with those kind of deals." ~Ross Perot

https://youtu.be/Rkgx1C_S6ls

For those on SS and Medicare and not personally concerned about jobs, lower paying jobs - and loss of jobs - because of these UNFAIR trade deals means lower FICA contributions, which means the weakening of Social Security and Medicare, more people on food stamps, SSDI and Medicaid, which will give the GOP yet another reason to attack "entitlements."

Trade and loss of manufacturing and other jobs to offshoring, H1-B, and all other manner of chicanery is the common ground for Trump and Sanders voters, which is why so many older Sanders people say they'll vote for Trump if Sanders isn't the Democratic nominee - even though Trump's views on immigration are diametically opposed to Sanders'. Immigration reform has a much lower priority (often NO PRIORITY) for those who've lost jobs to foreigners - whether they be illegals here or offshored overseas. Further, many see illegals as further undermining our entire fabric of life with their calculated use of social safety nets available to - yes - even illegals.

The other day on C-Span a well-educated Indian woman spoke on the advantages of foreign trade. She referred to job loss effects cited by the viewers through personal experience and observation as anecdotal, and stated that the data was clear, overall trade was beneficial to the country. C-Span callers can be very rude - fortunately, she escaped the vitriol. Nonetheless the anger came through in many callers' voices and their euphemistically veiled statements. Hearing about the advantages of "trade" from a person who clearly is not from the US (albeit now a 'citizen') rubbed salt in the wound, and was beyond insulting, imo. C-Span chose its 'expert' poorly that day.

This is why many Sanders people will vote for Trump even though it is "illogical."

Last edited by Ariadne22; 03-15-2016 at 06:35 PM..
 
Old 03-15-2016, 06:14 PM
 
8,088 posts, read 4,423,234 times
Reputation: 3074
None of the candidates are quite what they seem. Looking more and more like these are the finalists.

That includes Clinton who definitely cares more about her wealth and power then the little people. Educated in elite schools, first a lawyer of questionable ethics, then a wife of a successful politician, gifted with a Senate seat where not notable accomplishments were recorded, gifted with a cabinet position both as hush money and to burnish the credentials. Accomplishments there? I dunno; show me.

The little people opine by Mrs Clinton is just a means to an end. A statist all the way.

Trump has been playing to crowd; already in the process of pivoting for the general election. He is a tough, no holds barred man from Queens that overly sensitive folks get exorcised about and can easily caricature. Bankruptcy? It is legal. Many, many business people use it to protect assets, rebuild the treasury, live to fight another day. Same with eminent domain. Not a question of ethics.

If a law is on the books, why not use it strategically?

Morality: call it a draw for these two. Madam Secretary has enabled a serial philander (or worse), attacking innocent women. The Donald has cared little about the sanctity of the marital vows.
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