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Old 02-28-2013, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,662 times
Reputation: 217

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Anyway in burbs the housing closest to a Metra station can sometimes go for more money that thoose further out (however said town needs to be desirable to begin with) and towns with Metra stations can be more expensive to live in than towns that lack it.
I would have thought so.
Those that want to commute by transit (Metra?) can have a short journey to the station, even walk. And then take the train. That ought to be attractive to enough people to push up property values - especially if there are jobs near the stations on the other end of the Metra ride.

In a Strongtowns podcast, Rasmussen talks about how it makes sense to build Commuter housing immediately adjacent to the station - and that (obviously) makes great sense to me.

Here's another podcast about Transit planning: "More than Buses" and "choke points":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jzny9xRAFjo

Jarrett Walker, international consultant in public transit, presents at the first session of It`s More Than Buses - a three-part series on the future of public transportation in HRM.

It's More Than Buses is based on the premise that a clear direction for the future of the municipality's public transit system needs to be championed by the citizens who rely on Halifax's transportation system to meet their daily mobility needs, whether it's travel to work, school, health care, shopping, recreation or entertainment.


The first question he asks is: "how much development did you have in 1948," because he observes that developments before then were sufficiently dense and walkable (to still make sense.)

The bad transit design started after that, when cars were at the core of the thinking.

Let's roll back the clock in our thinking ! - If we want Strong Towns.
(CARS ARE LAST : let's put them back into their proper place.)

Last edited by Geologic; 02-28-2013 at 12:18 AM..
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:07 AM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,861,397 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
I would have thought so.
Those that want to commute by transit (Metra?) can have a short journey to the station, even walk. And then take the train. That ought to be attractive to enough people to push up property values - especially if there are jobs near the stations on the other end of the Metra ride.
Yeap and with zoning laws they keep denesity down(Heck I live in a residential area of Chicago and even I don't want certian types of things near my house). You get the best of both worlds large house with big yard and reasonable commute to work.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:10 AM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,861,397 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post

Rasmussen talks about how it makes sense to build Commuter housing immediately adjacent to the station - and that (obviously) makes great sense to me.
This part is iffy. Some of the areas around stations are the town's old downtown/pre WWII areas. Areas that were and are commercial in character not areas where you want lots of housing. In addition by driving to the station (or being dropped off) they can live away from density. A 30 min train ride followed by a 15 min drive isn't a bad commute.

If they wanted a smaller place they could live in the city and have a faster commute.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,662 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
This part is iffy. Some of the areas around stations are the town's old downtown/pre WWII areas. Areas that were and are commercial in character not areas where you want lots of housing. In addition by driving to the station (or being dropped off) they can live away from density. A 30 min train ride followed by a 15 min drive isn't a bad commute.

If they wanted a smaller place they could live in the city and have a faster commute.
Well... okay.
I suppose how much demand there is for being close to the station.
If the train goes "from nowhere to nowhere" (as Residents of KL say about their transport system), then few will use it, and there will be little demand to live near it.

But if the transit system connects to job areas, and to other things people want to visit regularly, then there is likely to be housing demand near the station. Some retail (and especially grocery shopping) in the same area, is an even better anchor.

Here's another example of how the do it in London



This is a view of a new housing development (the Pulse), where the photo was taken standing right next to the Colindale Station. That's not too far for a walk, is it?

And you can believe that every potential resident will want to know if there will be grocery shopping in the complex. With it, they will not need a car at all.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:32 AM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,861,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post

But if the transit system connects to job areas, and to other things people want to visit regularly, then there is likely to be housing demand near the station. Some retail (and especially grocery shopping) in the same area, is an even better anchor.
Yeap but the walkablity of that area may or may not be good. What makes the burbs bad for public transit is their layout and often lack of sidewalk(and walking without one can be dangerous). So there can be retial and gocery near the train station as well as housing but again you may or may not be able to get to it safetly without a car.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,662 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
I would have thought so.
(CARS ARE LAST : let's put them back into their proper place.)
I know - some will think I am anti-car, and disagree.
Actually, I am pro-human, and pro-pedestrian, and maybe pro-car.

If I was to say, "To Hail with your cars!"
Some would disagree. Like this guy, who really loves his car:


Man Desperately Tries to Protect Car From Hail - YouTube

Real message : Let's keep some humor here !
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:51 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,662 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Yeap but the walkablity of that area may or may not be good. What makes the burbs bad for public transit is their layout and often lack of sidewalk(and walking without one can be dangerous). So there can be retail and grocery near the train station as well as housing but again you may or may not be able to get to it safetly without a car.
You are right.
Many American suburbs need a comprehensive re-fit. But we need to start someplace.
And beginning around the stations is a very good place to start. At least the people who live there can get some benefit.

Personally, I think a Station without a Mall, and a Mall without a transit station, both represent wasted opportunities.

Here's a VIDEO showing an American being pleasantly surprised by the efficiency of the Singapore transit system:

https://www.youtube....h?v=1H3WbCKxWt0

This is what works (in a real city), Ladies and Gentles. Too bad this type of design is so hard to find in an American city. Did you see any cars or parking while he walked through the station on his journey?

This is how transit works in a city that generates wealth for its citizens, rather than draining it everyday through excessive motoring as in America.

(I do hope that a few people will look at this, and instead of getting defensive, would say: "Hey, maybe there's something to this Asian transit-plus-density model. I want prosperity in my community. Maybe we could try it in my city.")

BTW, I don't like such a long walk without seeing the sky, but I certainly prefer that to walking through a parking lot and dodging cars.

AND: there's nothing to stop people from going on living in traditional suburbs. But I think we need a good solid CORE like this to give people and alternative, and start generating wealth again, before everything is drained out of the system.

Last edited by Geologic; 02-28-2013 at 01:19 AM..
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:53 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,799 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Yeap and with zoning laws they keep denesity down(Heck I live in a residential area of Chicago and even I don't want certian types of things near my house). You get the best of both worlds large house with big yard and reasonable commute to work.
I understand what you are saying, but the best of both worlds depends on the person. For my parents a big house is what they like because they spend so much time in the house. At this point in life I just look at a house as a place to sleep or relax, I would love to be able to wake up, take a step outside and have access to things with my feet.

When I stayed in Chicago that's what I had in the area I stayed. I spent everyday out and by the time I got back for sleep, I didn't care how big or small my room was, I was just thankful to have a place to sleep haha. I just know I loved being close to so much. We don't have anything like that here in Michigan. I'll be in NYC next week so I expect to be amazed again haha.
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:02 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,107,012 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Yeap but the walkablity of that area may or may not be good. What makes the burbs bad for public transit is their layout and often lack of sidewalk(and walking without one can be dangerous). So there can be retial and gocery near the train station as well as housing but again you may or may not be able to get to it safetly without a car.
Yes. But these things you mention are easily fixed.
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,662 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Yes. But these things you mention are easily fixed.
And fixed them, does not solve the real problem of suburbia : the long commutes

Conferences are being organised to look past the disaster of the suburbs...

URBAN LIVING and DENSITY are linked to Prosperity - says Ed Glaser

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNQDgvevjHE

And the statistics he provides back him up.

"On Net - The right answer is Cities.
But not so much in the US, as in cities in Asia."

Last edited by Geologic; 02-28-2013 at 07:57 AM..
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