U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-02-2012, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Sputnik Planitia
6,904 posts, read 9,682,122 times
Reputation: 7598

Advertisements

What line of jobs are going to see salaries/demand grow in the future and which jobs do you think are going to decline in terms of salaries and demand.

My view:

Growth -
Healthcare - Pharmacists, Doctors, Nurses

Decline -
Tech - Software Engineers, Systems Anaylsts (simply no need for these jobs in the US, all can be shipped offshore)
Education - Teachers (budget cuts in the future)
Admin type work - call center staff etc. (whatever is remaining)
Accountants - all this number crunching work is going to low cost countries
Real estate agents - will no longer need them, this role is going to become obsolete
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-02-2012, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,736 posts, read 5,553,035 times
Reputation: 4107
Quote:
Originally Posted by k374 View Post
What line of jobs are going to see salaries/demand grow in the future and which jobs do you think are going to decline in terms of salaries and demand.

My view:

Growth -
Healthcare - Pharmacists, Doctors, Nurses

Decline -
Tech - Software Engineers, Systems Anaylsts (simply no need for these jobs in the US, all can be shipped offshore)
Education - Teachers (budget cuts in the future)
Admin type work - call center staff etc. (whatever is remaining)
Accountants - all this number crunching work is going to low cost countries
Real estate agents - will no longer need them, this role is going to become obsolete
Hydrologists. Water is going to be more valuable than oil.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2012, 08:10 PM
 
48,508 posts, read 88,463,443 times
Reputation: 18187
Ithnik that the health profession will gow in numbers of jobs but have seen their greatest rewards salary wise already.The top ten per cent within sciences and math will domiate from what I hear.Other than that financial will reciver and keep being paid well to invest money as more have to invest to reitre.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2012, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Lowell, MA
6,926 posts, read 5,931,820 times
Reputation: 10149
I also agree Healthcare and the technological field will be at the higher paying fields in the future.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2012, 04:39 AM
 
2,930 posts, read 6,457,393 times
Reputation: 1377
Growth:
Consultants
Tech
Engeneering

Decline:
Healthcare (except doctors) Competition, too many people switching to that field, easy entry
Some government jobs (replaced by faster or more efficient technology)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2012, 07:12 AM
 
3,457 posts, read 3,286,459 times
Reputation: 1532
Finance, banking.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2012, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,616 posts, read 12,424,754 times
Reputation: 6624
Quote:
Originally Posted by k374 View Post
Decline -
Tech - Software Engineers, Systems Anaylsts (simply no need for these jobs in the US, all can be shipped offshore)
As an internet marketer, I have to say that I disagree. While you can have an offshore company develop any software you want, it takes American imagination and management to make sure everything works out the way a consumer will want it to, especially when it comes to software. Offshore labor is good to get all the annoying, repetitive tasks done that no American would ever want to do. But when it comes to making sure the software is user friendly, American labor is generally necessary.

Just like when it comes to building websites. A lot of American web design firms have their offshore partners build the template, but then American workers complete all the functionality components and anything else that requires imagination and creativity.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2012, 11:27 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 11,307,928 times
Reputation: 4125
Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
As an internet marketer, I have to say that I disagree. While you can have an offshore company develop any software you want, it takes American imagination and management to make sure everything works out the way a consumer will want it to, especially when it comes to software. Offshore labor is good to get all the annoying, repetitive tasks done that no American would ever want to do. But when it comes to making sure the software is user friendly, American labor is generally necessary.

Just like when it comes to building websites. A lot of American web design firms have their offshore partners build the template, but then American workers complete all the functionality components and anything else that requires imagination and creativity.
The same can be said of manufacturing. Many many companies are coming out and saying they were wrong about offshoring some of the manufacturing jobs to low wage countries. Intellectual property issues, skimming, state-based subsidies which heavily favor local businesses 99.9999% of the time, and low-skilled workers are all contributing to the 500,000 new manufacturing jobs that are available now. Manufacturers are also finding that when you export jobs, you export the learning of new technology and processes that go with it, so they're having to re-train hundreds of thousands who want work.

I think Jim McNerny, CEO of Boeing, said it best when he said that "we, lemminglike" exported jobs to places like China whilst attracted by low wages. Rising oil costs, rising wages in those previously-cheap countries, and aforementioned other issues are finally coming to a head. Why pay foreigners to do the work and then a year later turn around and have an exact copy domestically produced compete against you, while also having said competitor benefit from extremely slanted domestic rules?

No thank you! I can see why so many places are hiring now.

Anyway, my predictions for growth:

Skilled manufacturing (CNC machining, crane operators, people who fix the robots who do the assembly work, etc)
Engineering (specifically aerospace, mechanical, nano-tech, etc)
Man/machine interfaces (cybernetics and hardware/wetware interfaces)
software engineering (artificial intelligence and automated decision-making neural networks are the future)

Decline:

Low skilled work (like textiles, toys, basically anything that requires less than a high school diploma)
Business related majors, like MBA's, as they've become ubiquitous and increasingly supplanted by automation
University professorships - the education cost bubble has to pop eventually and low cost city colleges and foreign universities are becoming more attractive
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2012, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,616 posts, read 12,424,754 times
Reputation: 6624
Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
The same can be said of manufacturing. Many many companies are coming out and saying they were wrong about offshoring some of the manufacturing jobs to low wage countries. Intellectual property issues, skimming, state-based subsidies which heavily favor local businesses 99.9999% of the time, and low-skilled workers are all contributing to the 500,000 new manufacturing jobs that are available now. Manufacturers are also finding that when you export jobs, you export the learning of new technology and processes that go with it, so they're having to re-train hundreds of thousands who want work.

I think Jim McNerny, CEO of Boeing, said it best when he said that "we, lemminglike" exported jobs to places like China whilst attracted by low wages. Rising oil costs, rising wages in those previously-cheap countries, and aforementioned other issues are finally coming to a head. Why pay foreigners to do the work and then a year later turn around and have an exact copy domestically produced compete against you, while also having said competitor benefit from extremely slanted domestic rules?

No thank you! I can see why so many places are hiring now.

Anyway, my predictions for growth:

Skilled manufacturing (CNC machining, crane operators, people who fix the robots who do the assembly work, etc)
Engineering (specifically aerospace, mechanical, nano-tech, etc)
Man/machine interfaces (cybernetics and hardware/wetware interfaces)
software engineering (artificial intelligence and automated decision-making neural networks are the future)

Decline:

Low skilled work (like textiles, toys, basically anything that requires less than a high school diploma)
Business related majors, like MBA's, as they've become ubiquitous and increasingly supplanted by automation
University professorships - the education cost bubble has to pop eventually and low cost city colleges and foreign universities are becoming more attractive
Absolutely agree with your post. Hiring in this country is and will continue to grow, in my opinion. Moral of the story is you get what you pay for. India, China, and all those countries with cheap labor have their people trained like robots. They do not promote creativity and individual thinking like American educational institutions do.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2012, 01:00 PM
 
8,265 posts, read 11,197,451 times
Reputation: 4788
People have been wringing their hands about all the software dev jobs going overseas since the late 90s, but the growth in need continues to outpace the rate of outsourcing.

Plus as others have alluded to you get what you pay for. For template things like simple e-commerce websites fine that team in India can stamp it out just fine, but for more complex projects with constantly evolving dynamic business needs many a company has run into minefields trying to achieve success with outsourced developers.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top