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Old 08-27-2010, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,268 posts, read 3,253,181 times
Reputation: 3697

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Let's take a more recent look at the 3 states referenced above, Georgia, North Carolina & Texas, & see how they are doing now, a little further long into the current period economic troubles.
It would appear that the latest stats just made available bear out a drastic population growth slowdown in once-booming Georgia. The Atlanta Regional Commission has released new population estimates that show the last 2 years to have recorded the slowest growth in the 10 core counties of Metro Atlanta since the 1950's! Over that 2 year period, the growth has been so slow that there has not been any noticeable domestic migration into the area &, as metro Atlanta goes, so goes the state of Georgia.
Looking to the north in North Carolina, given the extent of the banking meltdown & real estate slowdown in Charlotte, the migration into that metro has more than likely slowed substantially. The Raleigh-Durham area has taken some economiclumps on the chin as well. The overall unemployment rate in North Carolina continues to be way too high to support much domestic in migration.
Does anyone have NEW stats to support or refute my statements? By the way, I am not referring to stats from 2008 either that would still reflect the prebust time of growth.
A glance at the MOST RECENT estimates for all of the southeastern & southcentral sunbelt states show a marked growth slowdown for the region. As a result, several states have recorded growth for the decade at rates similar to states in the upper plains & upper midwest. Only the continued superlative growth enjoyed by Texas pushes the combined total up appreciably.
Texas is almost an entity unto itself & is the ONLY southeastern/southcentral state, other than Arkansas, to still be showing population growth similar to levels exhibited earlier in the decade that is now drawing to a close.
The entire southeast continues to have high unemployment levels that preclude in migration of any substance & actually are on par with the levels registered in the much derided rust belt/auto belt.
A survey of state by state unemployment rates reveals that pockets of both New England & the northeast, most of the plains states & scattered portions of the Rocky Mountain West have the lowest unemployment rates.
When the new 2010 census figures are released, don't be misled by the new numbers that will show substantial southeastern growth, particularly along the Atlantic seaboard, as that growth will be a reflection of the boom recorded earlier in the decade & will not be an accurate snapshot of the current state of growth.
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Old 08-27-2010, 10:47 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,342,712 times
Reputation: 2698
GA, NC, and TX are still "booming" relative to other areas in the country. Domestic migration has slowed considerably nationwide due to the housing/banking crisis, but people are still moving to the Sunbelt. Unfortunately, a lot of people moved/are moving to these states without jobs or only had them for a little while before the recession claimed them, which helps to the explain the high statewide unemployment rates.

The good thing about Charlotte in particular is that we've gotten some rather big economic development announcements within the past year or so that will help with job creation, and the fallout from the banking crisis hasn't been quite as bad as it was predicted to be. The Raleigh-Durham area didn't really "take it on the chin," at least when compared to Charlotte and Florida. The universities and state government are economic stabilizers there, and Research Triangle Park continues to be a huge jobs engine and attract several high-tech companies.
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Old 08-27-2010, 04:11 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,825,755 times
Reputation: 11141
Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
Let's take a more recent look at the 3 states referenced above, Georgia, North Carolina & Texas, & see how they are doing now, a little further long into the current period economic troubles.
It would appear that the latest stats just made available bear out a drastic population growth slowdown in once-booming Georgia. The Atlanta Regional Commission has released new population estimates that show the last 2 years to have recorded the slowest growth in the 10 core counties of Metro Atlanta since the 1950's! Over that 2 year period, the growth has been so slow that there has not been any noticeable domestic migration into the area &, as metro Atlanta goes, so goes the state of Georgia.
Looking to the north in North Carolina, given the extent of the banking meltdown & real estate slowdown in Charlotte, the migration into that metro has more than likely slowed substantially. The Raleigh-Durham area has taken some economiclumps on the chin as well. The overall unemployment rate in North Carolina continues to be way too high to support much domestic in migration.
Does anyone have NEW stats to support or refute my statements? By the way, I am not referring to stats from 2008 either that would still reflect the prebust time of growth.
A glance at the MOST RECENT estimates for all of the southeastern & southcentral sunbelt states show a marked growth slowdown for the region. As a result, several states have recorded growth for the decade at rates similar to states in the upper plains & upper midwest. Only the continued superlative growth enjoyed by Texas pushes the combined total up appreciably.
Texas is almost an entity unto itself & is the ONLY southeastern/southcentral state, other than Arkansas, to still be showing population growth similar to levels exhibited earlier in the decade that is now drawing to a close.
The entire southeast continues to have high unemployment levels that preclude in migration of any substance & actually are on par with the levels registered in the much derided rust belt/auto belt.
A survey of state by state unemployment rates reveals that pockets of both New England & the northeast, most of the plains states & scattered portions of the Rocky Mountain West have the lowest unemployment rates.
When the new 2010 census figures are released, don't be misled by the new numbers that will show substantial southeastern growth, particularly along the Atlantic seaboard, as that growth will be a reflection of the boom recorded earlier in the decade & will not be an accurate snapshot of the current state of growth.
From 2008-2009, the Raleigh/Cary MSA had the FASTEST growth rate of any metro in the nation. ....hardly taking it on the chin. The Triangle also boasts the lowest unemployment rate of any metro in the state. It's 3 full percentage points below Charlotte's and 2 percentage points below the national average. It's still growing now while it's reducing its unemployed percentage month over month. I read today that both Charlotte and Raleigh are recovering without much stimulus aid. So, it's safe to say that the recovery there has some teeth. Things aren't perfect but the metros and the state of NC continue to grow with Northeasterners and Floridians in particular.
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Old 08-28-2010, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM - Summerlin, NV
3,436 posts, read 5,988,941 times
Reputation: 682
Thank god they are not coming to New Mexico... we don't wanna be like Arizona. Noooo way.
Less people = More space.
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Old 08-28-2010, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,656 posts, read 7,459,969 times
Reputation: 4327
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradly View Post
Thank god they are not coming to New Mexico... we don't wanna be like Arizona. Noooo way.
Less people = More space.
...but Bradly, you always tout how Rio Rancho is growing. Do you enjoy the growth or do you not want the growth? (just asking)
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Old 08-28-2010, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
2,161 posts, read 3,992,025 times
Reputation: 1434
Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
Let's take a more recent look at the 3 states referenced above, Georgia, North Carolina & Texas, & see how they are doing now, a little further long into the current period economic troubles.
It would appear that the latest stats just made available bear out a drastic population growth slowdown in once-booming Georgia. The Atlanta Regional Commission has released new population estimates that show the last 2 years to have recorded the slowest growth in the 10 core counties of Metro Atlanta since the 1950's! Over that 2 year period, the growth has been so slow that there has not been any noticeable domestic migration into the area &, as metro Atlanta goes, so goes the state of Georgia.
Looking to the north in North Carolina, given the extent of the banking meltdown & real estate slowdown in Charlotte, the migration into that metro has more than likely slowed substantially. The Raleigh-Durham area has taken some economiclumps on the chin as well. The overall unemployment rate in North Carolina continues to be way too high to support much domestic in migration.
Does anyone have NEW stats to support or refute my statements? By the way, I am not referring to stats from 2008 either that would still reflect the prebust time of growth.
A glance at the MOST RECENT estimates for all of the southeastern & southcentral sunbelt states show a marked growth slowdown for the region. As a result, several states have recorded growth for the decade at rates similar to states in the upper plains & upper midwest. Only the continued superlative growth enjoyed by Texas pushes the combined total up appreciably.
Texas is almost an entity unto itself & is the ONLY southeastern/southcentral state, other than Arkansas, to still be showing population growth similar to levels exhibited earlier in the decade that is now drawing to a close.
The entire southeast continues to have high unemployment levels that preclude in migration of any substance & actually are on par with the levels registered in the much derided rust belt/auto belt.
A survey of state by state unemployment rates reveals that pockets of both New England & the northeast, most of the plains states & scattered portions of the Rocky Mountain West have the lowest unemployment rates.
When the new 2010 census figures are released, don't be misled by the new numbers that will show substantial southeastern growth, particularly along the Atlantic seaboard, as that growth will be a reflection of the boom recorded earlier in the decade & will not be an accurate snapshot of the current state of growth.
Can you link me those stats?
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Old 08-28-2010, 07:20 PM
 
686 posts, read 1,516,844 times
Reputation: 156
Much of the sunbelt is still growing fast and is going to continue to regardless of the recession, and will probably pick up faster after the recession.
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Old 08-28-2010, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Cleveland bound with MPLS in the rear-view
5,530 posts, read 10,148,967 times
Reputation: 2384
wrong
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Old 08-29-2010, 08:14 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,342,712 times
Reputation: 2698
Much of the Sunbelt is still growing fast, that's a fact. Of course not as fast as it used to be, but still faster than most other metros in other parts of the country. I'm not sure about the growth returning to pre-recession levels anytime soon as that remains to be seen, but the higher-than-average growth will continue here for a while. Look for a lot of the smaller Sunbelt cities to start picking up steam and getting more coverage.
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Old 08-29-2010, 08:30 AM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,197,706 times
Reputation: 7744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Much of the Sunbelt is still growing fast, that's a fact. Of course not as fast as it used to be, but still faster than most other metros in other parts of the country. I'm not sure about the growth returning to pre-recession levels anytime soon as that remains to be seen, but the higher-than-average growth will continue here for a while. Look for a lot of the smaller Sunbelt cities to start picking up steam and getting more coverage.

This makes sense, i could see areas like Charlotte and RDU getting some more growth as they have more room to scale and NC does a pretty good job attracting businesses.
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