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Old 10-19-2011, 04:10 AM
 
1,494 posts, read 2,269,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
I agree with you buddy. As s born and bred native of this city myself I have done everything and have been almost everywhere in this city and also had many negative and positive experiences living here in ny. I too used my college id when I was a student to get access to discounts st meseums and concert halls such as lincoln center and carnagie hall. I out grew this city and its time to trade some concrete for some grass pretty soon. I know many transplants and they all come from somr boring lame duck homogenous town that they wish not to talk about. Sadly enough they dont understand why cityslickers like us are fascinated with small towns and burbs or all year warn weather.
Yeah it happens all the time; things change, needs change, tastes change, neighborhoods evolve and the next thing you know your hometown begins to suck for your situation. In my case, all of the above.

NYC isn't for everyone, and even home-grown Yankees get sick of it over the course of a few decades. I usually chortle when I see peeps in denial about how boring the place can be sometimes, venues plentiful but NOT unlimited; live here long enough and you can run out of things to do- even if you're interested in arts and culture. My "been there, done that" list is pretty freaking long- sounds like yours is too!

Newcomers are usually thrilled with the city, there's an enormous novelty factor regarding that. It's easy to fall in love with the place when you're seeing and experiencing lots of new things that only a big city can offer. But once you've gotten that initial post-coital-esque glow out of your system you start to see the flip side.

I know what you mean about the fascination with small towns and the burbs. While visiting the in-laws in the burbs I've been known to waltz in the grocery store isles simply because I CAN. There's enough room to dance around, even flail around on the floor while foaming at the mouth (if you wanted to) without bumping into 40 people. Flash forward to last Friday in Manhattan where it took me 5 minutes just to get milk into my shopping basket because I had fight my way through a crowd blocking the dairy section (like a herd of stupid cows in heat).

Next month I'm headed out to Nashville to take a look around and see how I like it. No state income tax, low property taxes, a great music scene good restaurants throughout Nash and the suburbs, excellent shopping, green rolling hills, low cost of living, and a different culture. I've already been to Dallas and liked it, strangely I found the Texas swagger to be similar to the old NYC swagger, just different accents and manners. Call me crazy if you want, that was just my take on it.

Last edited by Alkonost; 10-19-2011 at 04:21 AM..
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Old 10-19-2011, 05:04 AM
 
39 posts, read 66,710 times
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Eventually leaving to miami purely for weather purposes. I simply cannot take the cold for the rest of my life. Its too much/
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Old 10-19-2011, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, NY
7,965 posts, read 6,542,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alkonost View Post
Next month I'm headed out to Nashville to take a look around and see how I like it. No state income tax, low property taxes, a great music scene good restaurants throughout Nash and the suburbs, excellent shopping, green rolling hills, low cost of living, and a different culture.
You're probably going to love Nashville. We went two years ago and my wife bugged me for a while to move there. I'm not too keen on the south though, so it was a No-Go for me. Great bars, music, plenty to do, great outdoors just outside the city... it had a lot going for it even in my eyes.
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Old 10-19-2011, 11:01 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,490 posts, read 3,845,982 times
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Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
You're probably going to love Nashville. We went two years ago and my wife bugged me for a while to move there. I'm not too keen on the south though, so it was a No-Go for me. Great bars, music, plenty to do, great outdoors just outside the city... it had a lot going for it even in my eyes.
So curious to visit a lot of southern cities, they seem to have such charm. I have only been to Florida, No. Carolina and Virginia, that's about it. I would love to visit the deep south. I don't know if living there would work for me, but it seems like such a nice place.
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Old 10-19-2011, 12:52 PM
 
1,494 posts, read 2,269,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
You're probably going to love Nashville. We went two years ago and my wife bugged me for a while to move there. I'm not too keen on the south though, so it was a No-Go for me. Great bars, music, plenty to do, great outdoors just outside the city... it had a lot going for it even in my eyes.
Thanks, this is reassuring- I've been doing a lot of reasearch online and it's good to have some feedback from peeps who have been there.

I was worried about culture clash while considering relocation from NYC. But the more I thought about it, the less it worried me. It doesn't bother me when others have different cultures or values- as long as they're good people I couldn't care less where the go to church, who they bang or what they eat. I know the South is a different world in terms of culture and ways of life, but I really don't mind it- I'm not out to convert the south to a more Yankee way of life, or to change the environment around me to one more like my hometown.

My first experience with a southerner was very pleasant. I was freakish teen dressed in east village punk attire when and a gentleman asked for directions since he was lost on West 12th- I'm not sure why he asked me specifically but in hindsight the place used to be a den for pre-op tranny prostitutes hanging out near the vault- buy was he in the wrong neighborhood. He was polite, so I helped him out. Then he thanked me and kissed my hand, not to flirt, but as was custom for southern manners. Holy crap that was nice! IT was a touch of old world grace I'd never seen before, and I freaking loved every minute of it.
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Old 10-19-2011, 07:43 PM
 
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I'm a native New Yorker who moved to Los Angeles for a couple years and couldn't stand it but thought New York was too crazy and too dirty so I moved to New Mexico and it's way to slow for me. I think if you have kids moving away from the city is probably a smart move BUT if you are single and like to keep busy, moving to a place that is slow will eventually drive you nuts. Yes, the city is crazy but maybe you just need a vacation from it because after you've lived in NYC it's really hard to live anywhere else. Yes, I have issues about living in the city, like how dirty it is but there is always stuff to do and interesting people to meet. Unless you move to Chicago, it's going to be hard to find a place like it.
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Old 10-19-2011, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, NY
7,965 posts, read 6,542,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alkonost View Post
I was worried about culture clash while considering relocation from NYC.
It's mostly the weather with me. I need four seasons, but lean heavily towards a good northeastern fall and winter. I can't move to a place where winter means no snow and 30's and fall is only a few weeks. A very close second is the southern view of alcohol. There are a ton of dry counties in Tennessee, even the one that Jack Daniel's is made in. I am a homebrewer so I could never live in a place where religion trumps my hobby. But there are a lot of great things in Nashville and I loved it as a vacation. We will be back for sure.
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Old 10-20-2011, 01:58 AM
 
1,494 posts, read 2,269,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
It's mostly the weather with me. I need four seasons, but lean heavily towards a good northeastern fall and winter. I can't move to a place where winter means no snow and 30's and fall is only a few weeks. A very close second is the southern view of alcohol. There are a ton of dry counties in Tennessee, even the one that Jack Daniel's is made in. I am a homebrewer so I could never live in a place where religion trumps my hobby. But there are a lot of great things in Nashville and I loved it as a vacation. We will be back for sure.
I share the sentiment about the winter and seasons. People call me a freak but I love winter, and the more snow and cold the better. I don't think NYC winters are harsh enough. While I liked Dallas I cringe when I think about how hot their summers are. Luckily Nashville has the change of seasons, and while the winter isn't as harsh as I'd like, at least they one. Nash wins out over Dallas in the weather/season department.

If Manchester airport had more flights, we'd move to New Hampshire in the heartbeat. Outside of NH the taxes suck balls, and we're not putting up with tax-theft anymore since we have a choice in where to move. This tax problem rules out most the rest of the northeast, and a lot of the midwest. Sadly we need a major airport so the northwest is out of the question (hubs hates Washington so that's out). Pity, I'd love to live in the mountains.
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Old 10-20-2011, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
543 posts, read 942,227 times
Reputation: 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alkonost View Post
Yeah it happens all the time; things change, needs change, tastes change, neighborhoods evolve and the next thing you know your hometown begins to suck for your situation. In my case, all of the above.

NYC isn't for everyone, and even home-grown Yankees get sick of it over the course of a few decades. I usually chortle when I see peeps in denial about how boring the place can be sometimes, venues plentiful but NOT unlimited; live here long enough and you can run out of things to do- even if you're interested in arts and culture. My "been there, done that" list is pretty freaking long- sounds like yours is too!

Newcomers are usually thrilled with the city, there's an enormous novelty factor regarding that. It's easy to fall in love with the place when you're seeing and experiencing lots of new things that only a big city can offer. But once you've gotten that initial post-coital-esque glow out of your system you start to see the flip side.

I know what you mean about the fascination with small towns and the burbs. While visiting the in-laws in the burbs I've been known to waltz in the grocery store isles simply because I CAN. There's enough room to dance around, even flail around on the floor while foaming at the mouth (if you wanted to) without bumping into 40 people. Flash forward to last Friday in Manhattan where it took me 5 minutes just to get milk into my shopping basket because I had fight my way through a crowd blocking the dairy section (like a herd of stupid cows in heat).

Next month I'm headed out to Nashville to take a look around and see how I like it. No state income tax, low property taxes, a great music scene good restaurants throughout Nash and the suburbs, excellent shopping, green rolling hills, low cost of living, and a different culture. I've already been to Dallas and liked it, strangely I found the Texas swagger to be similar to the old NYC swagger, just different accents and manners. Call me crazy if you want, that was just my take on it.
When i read that part of your post, i almost died laughing. Not b/c i'm laughing at you, but b/c i share your excitement!! When i moved up to WNY, close to Buffalo 3 years ago, my son & i wanted to go shopping all the time b/c the supermarkets up here are like Disneyland! Wide aisles, loads of fresh fruits and veges, smells of prepared and baked goods, large selection, clean shelves, clean floors and most of all SHORT LINES!!! The store that i love in particular is Wegmans. It's the best supermarket! It has always amazed me that the supermarkets in NYC will have, for example 10 registers, but at a maximum 3 are opened, creating super long lines. It's just one of those things about the City that sucks!
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Old 10-21-2011, 12:23 PM
 
Location: NYC
142 posts, read 392,717 times
Reputation: 86
If I were to leave NY it would only be for Italy (making the move again.. will be my second time living there this August 2012) or Chicago. I cannot live in a small town, no matter what. I need to be in the action. Chicago seems to be the only other US city that speaks to me.

Oh, I forgot South Beach. I'd totally live there.
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