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Old 05-11-2014, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
You may not be aware that Teddy's reference to gays in church was in response to someone who had found and quoted a previous post of his in another thread (possibly in another forum also). That link to Teddy's previous post was taken down by a moderator, leaving his post "orphaned" and without apparent context. In other words, he was just defending himself.
Be that as it may, it unfortunately went into the mix and muddied the OP. But thanks for clarifying.
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Old 05-11-2014, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,985,208 times
Reputation: 15649
When someone moves into a community such as those that are HOAs it goes without saying that they are accepting the terms and conditions of living in that community.

To answer what I think the OP is broaching, after going back six times to it to try to get it (in the OP he did not state whether his is a formal HOA community or one in which seniors comprise the majority of dwellings), it would be nice to have a "committee" to have some social conscience for those whose financial circumstances have changed since moving in and who are thus unable to uphold their responsibility to maintain their grounds. I continue to hold the view of the HOA maintaining a small fund and offering an application for assistance on a temporary basis. If assistance is not needed (seen by the responses on the application), then it's clear there is negligence and then that's that.
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Old 05-11-2014, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,220,203 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
It's time for this thread to close.
This is a valuable lesson. I am NOT going to purchase my demented father an IPad. I'm thinking it's best we children keep his "Alzheimer's moments" in-house.
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:02 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
This is a valuable lesson. I am NOT going to purchase my demented father an IPad. I'm thinking it's best we children keep his "Alzheimer's moments" in-house.
I like that
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,935,948 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post
Hopefully, the drought and water restrictions will take care of the lawn issue and this thread!
Drought in California? We don't have drought or anything near it in Florida these days (we had a super wet winter). Robyn
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,935,948 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Littlelu View Post
Not keeping up with your yard could be because of a lot of reasons, not just monetarily.

Personally I wouldn't and don't want to live in a neighborhood where every yard has to be perfect, bug free and mowed every 5 days. I like things to look nice but not everyone does and remember we live
in an imperfect world so tolerance is in order.........just my personal opinion, mind you! I have mine and you have yours.
So you are totally free to move somewhere where you can knee high weeds in your yard (which is not my HOA). Robyn
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:27 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,583 posts, read 10,933,686 times
Reputation: 19225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
...I do love my (relatively) small herb/butterfly/hummingbird garden - about 90' by 25' - that also incorporates some of my late mother's stuff - used to be bonsai - but is too big to be called that today. Here's one of her Japanese azaleas in bloom today.
Your garden must be a true showpiece.
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,935,948 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
When someone moves into a community such as those that are HOAs it goes without saying that they are accepting the terms and conditions of living in that community.

To answer what I think the OP is broaching, after going back six times to it to try to get it (in the OP he did not state whether his is a formal HOA community or one in which seniors comprise the majority of dwellings), it would be nice to have a "committee" to have some social conscience for those whose financial circumstances have changed since moving in and who are thus unable to uphold their responsibility to maintain their grounds. I continue to hold the view of the HOA maintaining a small fund and offering an application for assistance on a temporary basis. If assistance is not needed (seen by the responses on the application), then it's clear there is negligence and then that's that.
This is in all honesty a totally silly idea in the context of my HOA. A lot of the seniors where I live who ran into financial problems during the recent bust were very wealthy people who had market related problems and lived in houses worth $2-4 million (not all seniors are poor). Yup - the financial circumstances of these people changed - but why on earth should I contribute one dime to help them out? And - although I'm giving a rather extreme example - why should the conservative guy who lives well within his budget and buys a $100K house in community X bail out the not conservative guy who buys the $250k house in the same community that he can barely afford - has financial issues - and then can't afford to live in the place he bought?

I am willing to give exactly zero to any of my fellow homeowners - but am very willing to pay lawyers to place liens on their properties and foreclose on them when the deadbeats don't pay what they owe. The kind of situation you describe is a perfect example of creating a moral hazard (if people know they can depend on other people to bail them out - there's no reason for them to be prudent). Robyn
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:31 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11705
This thread has so much potential if it had gone a different direction and different scenario. A very legitimate discussion of the topic is retirement and having the sufficient resources long term to keep and maintain adequate and appropriate housing. We all know out living your money is a fear and certainly a well kept property is going to bite the dust prior to other things. Seniors face the challenge of roofing and HVAC repairs etc just like everyone else. We always read tales about seniors and rising property taxes forcing the issue for them. Lawn care probably goes early on in the game for many. The ramifications are considerable and futue blight a reality in some communities which isn't going to help senior sell to go into more appropriate housing. Hmmmmm reverse mortgage equity value?
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,980 posts, read 7,749,631 times
Reputation: 12187
In our last purchase home maintenance played a major role as we were in our late 60's and the work of maintaining a home was becoming a task even for a very good DIYer like myself.

We opted for a new build stand-alone home in an HOA that includes all outside maintenance of landscape and house exterior shell. Yes there are HOA fees that pay for the maintenance but we also bought in an HOA with little to no amenities so the majority of fees go to maintenance not luxuries. Even in a private home one either pays now (monthly fees) or pays later like a new roof, septic system, etc. Buying new puts off any maintenance issues (theoretically) for 10 to 12 years but there is no getting around home maintenance. The only way I could see getting around maintenance is renting but there is no way that with no mortgage and a reasonable HOA fee that renting makes economic sense to me even if it might be worry free living.

One thing any homeowner should do is to find good and fair repair/maintenance people to do what is necessary especially when they cannot do such due to age or inability. I have such an HVAC company and an auto mechanic I trust. Also have a local tire and auto service place I trust. Most anything else can be done by a good handyman though finding such is a task in itself. The best sources I have found are personal recommendations from friends, family, etc. and never, never, never hire a family member..........LOL
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