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Old 08-23-2019, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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aab: Here's another clip. I'm trying to find clips that show some unique vocabulary, but not having much luck so far. Still with these first two clips curious as to your impressions - language/accents. Also curious what your students think if you've played them it.

https://clyp.it/popkowuq
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Old 08-24-2019, 06:34 PM
 
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They should worry about learning Spanish and forget about accents.
Most Americans speak some sort of Mexican and people find it funny.
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Old 08-25-2019, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
aab: Here's another clip. I'm trying to find clips that show some unique vocabulary, but not having much luck so far. Still with these first two clips curious as to your impressions - language/accents. Also curious what your students think if you've played them it.

https://clyp.it/popkowuq
Good stuff. I found this on wikipedia about what makes the dialect unique compared to others in the Hispanic world, and it´s pretty fascinating how different the grammar (at least some conjugations) and phonology appear to be:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Mexican_Spanish

It could be though that over time, some of these archiac "rules" of the dialect may have been supplanted by the more common dialect from south of the border.

I´ll have to wait a little longer to show my students this, since in US History we´re still learning about Native Americans pre-Columbus...once we get into New Spain they´ll be hearing these.
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Old 08-25-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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aab: One thing I find interesting about the two clips is the use of the words "peso" and "reales". This is supremely interesting because: the "real" as a monetary coin quit being used about 80 years prior. And the "peso" was never in use in the United States. The people in NM were U.S. citizens since the late 1800s, so by 1960s they'd already been part of the U.S. for 80 years, yet they are still referring to money as "reales" and "pesos."

I will continue to dig through these recordings to see if I can find more interesting dialogues.
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Old 08-25-2019, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
aab: One thing I find interesting about the two clips is the use of the words "peso" and "reales". This is supremely interesting because: the "real" as a monetary coin quit being used about 80 years prior. And the "peso" was never in use in the United States. The people in NM were U.S. citizens since the late 1800s, so by 1960s they'd already been part of the U.S. for 80 years, yet they are still referring to money as "reales" and "pesos."
Yeah, that´s interesting...I guess Mexican pesos were a thing before the war and the changing of the borders? Puerto Ricans still usually say pesos or sometimes pesitos instead of dolares, I don´t know their rationale as I never asked (I just kind of ended up saying it myself when I lived there haha). The island changed hands in 1898, and that´s also a super long time for them to hang on to using that term for the currency...does dolar just not sound as appealing in Spanish? I guess I never stopped to really think about it.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
There is basically a proper spanish as there is a proper English. Meaning, there is a universal grammar and a standard vocabulary that is internationally understood and agreed upon. These are the "neutral" languages that you hear on news programs and which politicans and public speakers use.
Native English speakers don’t like CNN journalists. You’re not functional in a language if you C.S. just understand newscast style speaking. You’re certainly not functional in day to day life.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Grammar and spelling is heavily decided by the RAE in Madrid. The fact that grammar has official rules is why Spanish is written the same everywhere and there is a proper way of writing and/or spelling. What doesn't exist is a proper way of speaking Spanish. With that said, generally movies that are geared to a more international Spanish-speaking audience usually has the Madrid accent in Spain but in Latin America the same movie is dubbed in Mexico City. The accent from Madrid is hard on many peoples ears, especially the way they mention the "Z", which is a characteristic of Spain but in Andalucía no one that is native speaks Spanish like that.

The same doesn't happen with grammar and spelling in English. For example, theatre is more typical on the English in the UK, but theater is more typical of English in the USA.
Oh Spanish from Madrid is full of collaqualisms that won’t be used anywhere in Latin America.

Americans who learn Spanish in school speak like crap and native Spanish speakers won’t tolerate them well. One will have to live in a particular Latin American nation or Latino community in the US to get good.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Yeah, that´s interesting...I guess Mexican pesos were a thing before the war and the changing of the borders?
Yeah, exactly. Same thing with the reales, although my understanding is they went out of circulation around that time.

Quote:
Puerto Ricans still usually say pesos or sometimes pesitos instead of dolares, I don´t know their rationale as I never asked (I just kind of ended up saying it myself when I lived there haha). The island changed hands in 1898, and that´s also a super long time for them to hang on to using that term for the currency...does dolar just not sound as appealing in Spanish? I guess I never stopped to really think about it.
I'm not sure. You might be onto something there.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Canada
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I have heard people from several countries use the word "pesos" despite their local currencies being called something else.
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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aab: Did you hear the word escusao in the second conversation. Are you familiar with it? It's not unique to NM, but it is an old-timer word. Nobody uses it anymore. Ask your wife about it, she'll probably say something like "Oh, my grandparents used to say that word."

NYwriter: about news casters, yes and no. You're right in the sense that their way of talking is very contrived and sylistic. It's not "natural" dialogue. But the point is that it's universally understood.

To learn any language, Spanish or otherwise, I feel one needs to immerse themselves someplace where it's being spoken constantly. Our brains are pretty good at listening to languages and figuring them out over time.... Combine this approach with occasionally consulting a book or teacher where you can clarify certain points of grammar as needed, and you're on your way.
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